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8

It is something inbetween. noch is could be part of a temporal adverb. It could be a short form vor gerade/eben noch. The construct is used to focus on "she is going home", adding her shopping stop as a side line of what she did immediately before that. Sie kauft ein und geht (dann) noch nach Hause. would focus on her shopping. Her going home right after ...


8

In the examples you gave we have a nominalized adjective. Per Duden rule 72 these usually need to be capitalized. The gender is not defined by a rule but rather depends on the object, in both cases it is neuter here because the object is either neuter, or it was not defined. Examples: Meine Bekannte ist eine Frau Mein Bekannter ist ein Mann The ...


7

Because "staatlich" here is actually an adverb and applies/relates to "anerkannt", not to "Krankenpflieger". I had the same question, see "Eine schrecklich nette Familie": why? and the questions referenced from there.


6

We do decline names. This will also include an article even if this is part of the name. Sometimes the article will even be omitted when building a contraction with a preposition. Examples: Der Spiegel: In Artikeln des Spiegels wird Hintergrundwissen vermittelt. Die Zeit: In der Zeit lese ich regelmäßig das Dossier. Süddeutsche Zeitung: ...


6

First, as you see on inflection tables the masculine accusative of reich is always reichen. It doesn't matter if it's weak, strong or mixed inflection. But as @Anke already said in a comment it's genitive case here. You ask: "Wessen Ermordung? Die eines reichen franz. Kaufmannes". Again, have a look at the table and you'll notice that the ending must be an ...


5

Scroll down for English translation! In „eine schrecklich nette Familie“ ist das erste „Adjektiv“ gar kein Adjektiv, sondern ein Adverb! Das Wort „schrecklich“ bezieht sich nämlich nicht auf das Substantiv „Familie“, sondern auf das Adjektiv „nett“. „Schrecklich“ wird hier verwendet um das Wort „nett“ zu verstärken. Die Familie wird mit dieser Phrase als ...


5

Rather than word order the grammatical case determines the subject or objcect of a sentence. Note the difference in meaning after we changed cases in the given example: Den Kindern (O) hat das Planetarium (S) Spaß gemacht. Die Kinder (S) haben im Planetarium (O) Spaß gemacht.


5

a) Den Kindern hat der Besuch im Planetarium Spaß gemacht. b) Der Besuch im Planetarium hat den Kindern Spaß gemacht. c) Spaß hat den Kindern der Besuch im Planetarium gemacht. 'Den Kindern' is in the dative case because, in the German sentence construction, 'the children' is the indirect object (a.k.a. dative object) of the verb 'Spaß machen'. The ...


4

Yes, it is always „mein Schatz“, grammatical gender trumps natural gender. It could only become confusing if you introduced her into your speech as „mein Schatz“ in the first sentence and would then continue to talk about her in the next sentence, because grammar would dictate that you then use „er“. Usually people will avoid this and switch to „sie“. The ...


4

Oh it is quite common to use Schatz for your girlfriend or wife / children. You would always refer to her as mein Schatz as the word is masculine. When this masculine word refers to a female it is still masculine, and thus requires masculine declension of adverbs and adjectives. for the last. Schatz is more common with Girlfriend / Wife and i would deem ...


4

In addition to the other responses, the Kaufmann and his attributes in Die Ermordung des reichen französischen Kaufmanns are genitive in relation to the noun "Ermordung" (whose murder? Wessen Ermordung? -- genitive). The construction as a whole is not an accusative at all. The following would be an accusative: Er hat einen reichen französischen ...


4

The German Wiktionary offers all information you require. Let's for example take the substantive dog. The Wiktionary entry for dog gives us: Word name: Hund natural/grammatical genre: m inflections in plural: die Hunde dative plural: den Hunden genitive singular: des Hunds, des Hundes pronunciation: [hʊnt], Plural: [ˈhʊndə] (audio ...


3

While what Ben said is valid, it seems there's a strong notion of your second example. Here, the sentence could be read as Sie kauft zum Abschluss noch ein, dann ist sie fertig. Noch, in this case, marks the end of a series of chores Sara had to do, but focusing on that "ah, finally done" feeling you get afterwards.


3

Both of your examples are usages of the verb prefix "zu-" which can be found quite often for the following usages to indicate: a direction: zubewegen, zufließen, zutreten, zulächeln, ... an endpoint of movements: zuziehen, zuwandern, ... an addition (short for dazu): zufügen, zutun, zusetzen, ... the a closing process: zubinden, zukleben, ...


3

Nikolaus ist vor allen Dingen erstmal ein Name. Und dann wird der Genitiv gebildet, wie man ihn auch mit anderen Namen, wie Hans, bilden würden. ... nach dem Aufessen des Nikolaus... Nikolaus' Namenstag ist am sechsten Dezember. In der Umgangssprache ist Nikolauses jedoch üblicher und Wiktionary listet dies auch als reguläre Form. Ich halte beide ...


3

Like s6robat said, this is "Substantivierung". When you want to refer to something only by one of its properties, you can use that. A: Was willst du zum Geburtstag haben? B: Nur etwas Kleines. But the same goes for nichts, viel, wenig: A: Was sagt man so über ihn? B: Nichts Gutes? / Viel Gutes? / Wenig Gutes? Like deve pointed out in a ...


3

Singular Nominativ: Der Mann mit dem verbrannten Ohr ist der Nikolaus. Sinular Genitiv: Das ist des Nikolaus' kaputter Rennwagen. Singular Dativ: Diese Airline hat einmal dem Nikolaus gehört. Singular Akkusativ: Gestern hat man den Nikolaus wieder im Fernsehen gesehen. Plural Nominativ: Der Mann mit nur einem Ohr und der Mann mit ...


2

Much mentioned, Subject of the Sentence is "der Besuch", thus "den Kindern" is Dative object. If you want to have "Die Kinder" as Subject (and roughly pertain the meaning), you need to change the sentence to: Die Kinder (S) haben den Besuch(O) im Planetarium genossen.


2

It's the first meaning (still), with the implication that this is the very last thing she does (which would suggest that she does it quickly, too, in this particular situation). Other examples: Mother: "Warum gehst du nicht raus (spielen)?" Child: "Ich muss noch Hausaufgaben machen." After a snack: "Bist du noch hungrig?" In a bakery or so: ...


2

Sara arbeitet heute lange. Sie ist müde, aber zufrieden. Sie kauft noch ein und geht nach Hause. Hehe … »noch« is one of those little words that I guess must be really hard to learn for non-native speakers, just like »eben«, »ja«, »halt«, »doch«. (Not implying the rest of the language is easy to learn …) In this context, it means that on top of all ...


1

To add to the other answers... I think the word noch itself should not be translated directly as any option available (still, quickly,...) shifts the tone and adds something that isn't there in the German version. My translation would be this: She is tired but happy. She does her groceries and then she heads home. The then adds the same notion of the ...


1

Alle Welt ... Nominativ / Akkusativ Aus aller ** Welt ... Genitiv (?) Allen falls Ebenfalls Genitiv? Vgl. „keine s falls“ Vor allen Leuten ... Dativ Ich glaube, du hast schon recht ...


1

The core can never be 2 nouns (except enumerations)... We have 2 things here, Ermordung and Kaufmann and it is not an enumeration. Die Zeitung berichtet über die Ermordung, den Kaufmann und Uli Hoeneß. The Kaufmann is connected to Ermordung using a Genitive. What endings adjectives describing Kaufmann get is completely independent of what the ...


1

Für den Plural scheint beides zulässig zu sein. http://www.wortbedeutung.info/Nikolaus/ für den Genitiv sollten wohl Nikolaus oder Nikolaus' verwendet werden http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/Nikolaus_maennlicher_Vorname



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