Hot answers tagged

13

Nur „dieses Jahres“ ist korrekt. Die Zwiebelfisch-Kolumne des „Spiegel“ hat dazu gleich zwei Beiträge: Zwiebelfisch-Abc: dieses Jahres/diesen Jahres und Das Verflixte dieses Jahres. Ich habe selber zur Sicherheit erst mal recherchiert, die Version „diesen Jahres“ ist ziemlich verbreitet...


12

mein Schatz Articles do never change. And it is not uncommon at all to say "mein Schatz" to a woman. Compare to the use of "das Mädchen" :)


9

In the examples you gave we have a nominalized adjective. Per Duden rule 72 these usually need to be capitalized. The gender is not defined by a rule but rather depends on the object, in both cases it is neuter here because the object is either neuter, or it was not defined. Examples: Meine Bekannte ist eine Frau Mein Bekannter ist ein Mann The ...


9

Yes, it's genitiv of "die" (singluar and plural). So you might say: Alle, deren Muttersprache Deutsch ist, ... Jack, dessen Muttersprache Deutsch ist, ... Alice, deren Muttersprache Deutsch ist, ... See also here, here, or here. There is no alternative for it with your current sentence structure.


8

It is something inbetween. noch is could be part of a temporal adverb. It could be a short form vor gerade/eben noch. The construct is used to focus on "she is going home", adding her shopping stop as a side line of what she did immediately before that. Sie kauft ein und geht (dann) noch nach Hause. would focus on her shopping. Her going home right after ...


7

Because "staatlich" here is actually an adverb and applies/relates to "anerkannt", not to "Krankenpflieger". I had the same question, see "Eine schrecklich nette Familie": why? and the questions referenced from there.


7

The German Wiktionary offers all information you require. Let's for example take the substantive dog. The Wiktionary entry for dog gives us: Word name: Hund natural/grammatical genre: m inflections in plural: die Hunde dative plural: den Hunden genitive singular: des Hunds, des Hundes pronunciation: [hʊnt], Plural: [ˈhʊndə] (audio ...


7

a) Den Kindern hat der Besuch im Planetarium Spaß gemacht. b) Der Besuch im Planetarium hat den Kindern Spaß gemacht. c) Spaß hat den Kindern der Besuch im Planetarium gemacht. 'Den Kindern' is in the dative case because, in the German sentence construction, 'the children' is the indirect object (a.k.a. dative object) of the verb 'Spaß machen'. The ...


7

Beides ist nicht falsch. Die Version mit lassen verwendet den sogenannten Ersatzinfinitiv; bei manchen Verben, insbesondere den Modalverben wie müssen, ist der Ersatzinfinitiv zwingend, bei manchen anderen Verben kann man ihn verwenden oder auch nicht. Weitere Details findet man bei Canoo. Das Thema Ersatzinfinitiv wurde auch schon in diesen Fragen ...


6

We do decline names. This will also include an article even if this is part of the name. Sometimes the article will even be omitted when building a contraction with a preposition. Examples: Der Spiegel: In Artikeln des Spiegels wird Hintergrundwissen vermittelt. Die Zeit: In der Zeit lese ich regelmäßig das Dossier. Süddeutsche Zeitung: ...


6

First, as you see on inflection tables the masculine accusative of reich is always reichen. It doesn't matter if it's weak, strong or mixed inflection. But as @Anke already said in a comment it's genitive case here. You ask: "Wessen Ermordung? Die eines reichen franz. Kaufmannes". Again, have a look at the table and you'll notice that the ending must be an ...


6

Rather than word order the grammatical case determines the subject or objcect of a sentence. Note the difference in meaning after we changed cases in the given example: Den Kindern (O) hat das Planetarium (S) Spaß gemacht. Die Kinder (S) haben im Planetarium (O) Spaß gemacht.


6

The question is, if 'folgend' is used as a noun or as an adverb. Is it 'das Folgende' or 'die folgende Erklärung'? So your options are Die Testanweisung ist Folgendes, das was folgt: or Die Testanweisung ist folgende, Anweisung, die folgt: As a reference, check out the Duden entry for folgend and Regel 72 for capitalization of adjectives and ...


6

Short answer to your question: yes this is because sponsern is an anglicism. See also Korrekturen.de on this. As for your second question, whether there are similar examples, I’d say pretty much every word that is taken from English is a potential candidate. This depends on how “correctly” the verb was taken into the German language. An example: the verb ...


5

Scroll down for English translation! In „eine schrecklich nette Familie“ ist das erste „Adjektiv“ gar kein Adjektiv, sondern ein Adverb! Das Wort „schrecklich“ bezieht sich nämlich nicht auf das Substantiv „Familie“, sondern auf das Adjektiv „nett“. „Schrecklich“ wird hier verwendet um das Wort „nett“ zu verstärken. Die Familie wird mit dieser Phrase als ...


5

Nikolaus ist vor allen Dingen erstmal ein Name. Und dann wird der Genitiv gebildet, wie man ihn auch mit anderen Namen, wie Hans, bilden würde. … nach dem Aufessen des Nikolaus … Nikolaus' Namenstag ist am sechsten Dezember. In der Umgangssprache ist Nikolauses jedoch üblicher und Wiktionary listet dies auch als reguläre Form. Ich halte beide ...


5

Adjectives only inflect strongly if they come without an article (but they may follow a numeral). When the attributes qualify a feminine or plural noun, it also doesn’t matter whether the article is definite (die) or indefinite (eine), because weak and mixed inflection are the same for these two genders/numbers. mit requires dative case, but you got that ...


5

Naja drückt eigentlich eher eine Art Skepsis aus. Das bedeutet, dass derjenige, der das naja sagt, nicht von der Aussage des Vorsprechers überzeugt ist. Beispiel: A: Was hältst davon, wenn wir davor noch mal schnell in der Eisdiele vorbeischauen? B: Naja, eigentlich bin ich schon satt, außerdem vertrage ich doch kein Eis. Naja kann aber auch bei ...


4

Yes, it is always „mein Schatz“, grammatical gender trumps natural gender. It could only become confusing if you introduced her into your speech as „mein Schatz“ in the first sentence and would then continue to talk about her in the next sentence, because grammar would dictate that you then use „er“. Usually people will avoid this and switch to „sie“. The ...


4

Oh it is quite common to use Schatz for your girlfriend or wife / children. You would always refer to her as mein Schatz as the word is masculine. When this masculine word refers to a female it is still masculine, and thus requires masculine declension of adverbs and adjectives. for the last. Schatz is more common with Girlfriend / Wife and i would deem ...


4

In addition to the other responses, the Kaufmann and his attributes in Die Ermordung des reichen französischen Kaufmanns are genitive in relation to the noun "Ermordung" (whose murder? Wessen Ermordung? -- genitive). The construction as a whole is not an accusative at all. The following would be an accusative: Er hat einen reichen französischen ...


4

Singular Nominativ: Der Mann mit dem verbrannten Ohr ist der Nikolaus. Sinular Genitiv: Das ist des Nikolaus' kaputter Rennwagen. Singular Dativ: Diese Airline hat einmal dem Nikolaus gehört. Singular Akkusativ: Gestern hat man den Nikolaus wieder im Fernsehen gesehen. Plural Nominativ: Der Mann mit nur einem Ohr und der Mann mit ...


4

Auf Grund der übereinstimmenden Position zwischen Ende und Jahres wird das Demonstrativpronomen (diese,-r/s) als Adjektiv (wie z.B. letzte, -r/s) fehlinterpretiert, die Übereinstimmung im Sprechrhythmus bestärkt die Annahme, es handle sich um dieselbe grammatikalische Konstruktion. Ende letzten Jahres Ende diesen dieses Jahres Ende nächsten Jahres Den ...


4

This is a case of „starke Flexion“ of the adjective „alt“. Generally, the adjective „alt“ adapts to the noun „Rathaus“. There are different forms of inflection of the adjective: if there's an definite article („das Rathaus“), „schwache Flexion“ is applied; an indefinite article („ein Rathaus“) requires „gemischte Flexion“; if there's or no article at all („...


4

Suppose we have a word Sponsor/to sponsor (the German noun or the English verb; it does not matter) and want to derive a German verb from it. Let's have a little look at the history of the word sponsor. It is a nomen agentis derived from the latin verb spondere. Nomina agentis can be formed by suffixing -tor to the verbal root (spond-). Two contacting ...


4

Search for the subject … Ignoring the relative clauses for the moment, you can (somewhat) say Du bist das Schönste. Das Schönste bist du Das Schönste ist: Du Case one and two are basically the same sentence but case two makes use of the flexible placement of SPO in German. And all three sentences have valid grammar (although I have placed the ...


4

Duden Volume 9 Richtiges und gutes Deutsch suggests a simple test to identify the subject and the predicative in such sentences: Replace the linking verb (e.g. sein) with gelten als or bezeichnet werden als. The part that follows the conjunction als is the predicative (not the subject). The example given in the question Das Schönste, das du sein kannst, ...


4

Yes it is entirely possible to substitute the shwa-n combination with a vocalic n. Wrzlprmft wrote an answer on the topic stressing a different point and to an unrelated question (and in German). The bottom line is that the difference between shwa-consonant and just the consonant is not phonemic in German and they are not allophones, so nobody will really ...


3

Like s6robat said, this is "Substantivierung". When you want to refer to something only by one of its properties, you can use that. A: Was willst du zum Geburtstag haben? B: Nur etwas Kleines. But the same goes for nichts, viel, wenig: A: Was sagt man so über ihn? B: Nichts Gutes? / Viel Gutes? / Wenig Gutes? Like deve pointed out in a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible