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12

If you want to learn some formulas as Guten Tag, Auf Wiedersehen, Danke, Bitte, Ja, Nein, and so on, I think you can do it in one week. Whether you can call this "to learn German" is another question. There are books available that promise "Learn German/English in thirty hours" - that is throwing sand in your eyes. They mean thirty lessons of German/English ...


10

I'll recommend the test by the "Institut für Testforschung und Testentwicklung" in Leipzig: http://www.itt-leipzig.de/static/startseiteeng.html You can find alternatives if you search the Internet for "Wortschatztest".


9

Beside the already mentioned "Um die Ecke gedacht" I'd like to recommend the crosswords in the "Süddeutsche Magazin". Looking at your description of the NYT crosswords I would give it a Thursday or Friday difficulty. They provide solutions for the crossword of the previous week with comments - might be useful to get acquainted with the style and help ...


8

Since homecoming is an expression that has - to my knowledge - no counterpart in German, I would say something like Willst du mit mir zum Homecoming gehen? You could also use Hast du Lust, mit mir zum Homecoming zu gehen? Or, very politely Ich würde mich freuen, wenn du mich zum Homecoming begleitest/begleiten würdest. Update: I would ...


6

Ä There's no obvious difference in pronouncing Ärzte or Ärmel. As for ätzend, the ä is slightly more "e-like" than the usual ä, as it is a short vowel. Ä is close in pronunciation to the a in that or cap - an a pronounced more "e-like". Ö Is pronounced like the u in purse or the e in Perth. EDIT: It is possible to practice the ö by forming an o with your ...


6

Learning other languages as a way to learn German is actually just a good way to learn those other languages. If you want to learn German, then go for it. You should have a sense for your specific learning style and start with your comfort zone. Then push yourself into other areas. If the hearing intimidates you, start with reading and then move to ...


5

From personal experience: TV: The German state channels have big media libraries with tv shows. Start watching them with subtitles to get familiar with the language (If you like crime check the "Tatort" series). ARD: http://www.ardmediathek.de/tv ZDF: http://www.zdf.de/ZDFmediathek . Self-Learning: For a head start try the Tim Ferriss method: Learn ...


5

Depending on your vocabulary, get an Open dictionary. Free software comes with such dictionaries. Get the number of entries in the dictionary. wc -l /usr/share/hunspell/de_DE.dic 72374 /usr/share/hunspell/de_DE.dic Now take 100 words by random from the dictionary, and count how much you know. This schould be a good estimate. For higher acccuracy take ...


4

For online courses, I highly recommend Duolingo (especially if you're a relative beginner) - it's entirely free and without ads as well. I honestly wouldn't even consider paying money for an online course / language learning software before trying Duolingo and seeing if it works for you. Also, as you get more advanced, you can use the Immersion area and ...


4

Many German DVDs (or similar) of anglophone movies come with a German and English audio track and at least German subtitles. You should always check the specifications though. Though I have no experience with documentaries in specific, I do not see why this should not hold for those. The only annoyance might be that you have to import these from Germany and ...


4

In casual speech I would also consider "Ehemaligentreffen" ("formers' gathering") the correct term – if you relate to people you were studying with. This type of event can either be an official gathering of students, invited by their university – or an inofficial at some bar – or everything inbetween. The rather formal term "Alumnitreffen" ("alumni ...


4

If the homecoming you are referring to is with or in honor of alumni, the closest German translation that comes to my mind is das Ehemaligentreffen. If you enter Homecoming combined with Ehemaligentreffen in Google, you'll find some hits where German universities invite to their Ehemaligentreffen and also mention the term homecoming. So for the whole ...


4

If your problem is only to remember which is which, then it might help to know the origin of or related words to at least one of them. It is probably not a coincidence that none of the four words that you mention have cognates in English that I am aware of. But as you are Italian, it should help to know that “Schüssel” is probably derived from Latin and I ...


3

It is not easy to explain the special vowels of German, which traditionally are called Umlaute. But I remember having explained the articulation of ü to an American young man. My explanation was as follows: Say a long /i/ and keep your tongue in this i-position, i. e. the tongue is near the palate. Now round your lips strongly and push your lips forward as ...


3

I would add the Deutsche Welle website, www.dw.de - there are courses and materials for A1 (Beginners) level students and beyond, an it's free to boot.


3

Zum Lesen von Onlinematerial kann man den Chromium-Webbrowser verwenden. Für diesen gibt es eine Erweiterung, dict.cc, so dass man ein Wort markiert, rechts clickt, das Kontextmenü mit dem Eintrag dict.cc öffnet sich, click, und schon ist man beim Wörterbucheintrag mit diesem Wort. Für Firefox gibt es eine Erweiterung, bei der man das Wort einfach markiert, ...


3

I do this too. I read German news sites and de.wiki articles, then I alt-tab to Google Translate (or your preferred translator, like LEO or babelfish or whatever) for the words I don't know. I found a couple tricks helpful. First, you also need to do some vocabulary building directly if you are either very new to German or you are very rusty. Babbel has ...


3

Collect such examples under the heading "Similar words (I tend to mix up)". Note down the two words and try to get some good sentences from dictionaries. If you read this collection now and again it should help. If you find out that this is not enough you write down the difficult pair a second time, with new examples. I have made the experience that learning ...


2

As others said, the best way to come to terms with the idiocrasies of a language is to learn that language. my personal experience suggests that exposure to lots (lots) of vocabulary is preferable to exposure to lots of grammar. however, experience also tells me (and this is supported by results in linguistic research) that success in learning a foreign ...


2

There is no such resource for your special case. You can verify this by searching the internet, for instance with these search words learn deutsch online verb tenses examples or Deutsch lernen Verb Zeitformen Übungen. Instead you will find lots of good online learning tools, which either explain you the tenses and give only some examples, or give you verb ...


2

The problem with vocabulary is that either too few words are included, or the dictionary is too big and too hard to navigate. It's hardly viable to include such dictionary on every page, since the same words would repeat, and sometimes you don't know just that word the authors supposed you know, and therefore hadn't included it. Much more helpful for you ...


2

There can be many reasons for this (NB: I am not familiar with either show). I wouldn't rule out regional dialects (or speech variants or patterns, subtle as they may seem), or just the city the series are set in. It can make a huge difference, even for native speakers (I live in Austria, which is a very small market. If and when a TV show is exported to ...


2

The first problem to solve: find German movies for which German subtitles have been produced at all. Who would use them? Beside learners like you, it's mainly hearing impaired people, and they are not the most influential customer group... I checked out the titles that you listed - only 3 of them have DVD editions with German subtitles (Das Boot, Der Himmel ...


1

Your chances highly depend on which company you apply to. Usually companies with branches in english speaking countries are more likely to employ english speaking workers (the Company I'm currently working in resently build a branch in america and employs 4 workers, one of which works here in Germany with us), so all companys you mentioned are likely to ...


1

You shouldn't expect support for subtitles from online video streaming. I had a similar idea and didn't find video streaming with subtitles. I'm 100% certain that lovefilm.de is not supporting it. My suggestion is renting DVDs. Often DVDs have more than one audio track and subtitles in various languages. At least in Europe this is the case. Anyway, if you ...


1

I'm using courses from http://www.babbel.com/. They grouped by themes and levels, you can immediately use it in the real life conversations.


1

Nachrichten Leicht is another one that I haven't seen suggested yet.


1

There is a series of books that does what you're describing. The books are by Elisabeth May and are called the German Reader series; they are found in Amazon's Kindle section. The chapters start with a list of vocabulary words that will be used in that chapter. The author calls it the "ALARM" method (Approved Learning Automatic Remembering Method). Fair ...


1

You might be interested in an "Interlinear translation", where a translated English text is printed just beneath the German text. I found a self-published one of "Demian" by Hermann Hesse, which is a good read anyway. Another good method is to find a German translation (or even better, a German original) of a book you know well in English, such as The ...



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