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21

Mozart's German Mozart himself didn't write any of the texts (libretti) of his operas. He "only" wrote the music after a given text. And more than 70% of his operas are in Italian language (one, Apollo et Hyacinthus, KV 38, is even written in Latin). There are only four Mozart-operas with German libretti (five, if you also count the fragment Zaide, which ...


10

After 67 years of teaching a form of cursive ("Schnüerlischrift"), Swiss authorities have recommended substituting it with block letters for all schools in German-speaking Switzerland. As all fonts have slight differences, choosing one common set of letters is important for the benefit of learners. The suggested style is the Luzerner Basisschrift. It's use ...


4

If comics and illustrated stories count I’d like to add some (from the past 40ish years), most of which also come as movies, TV series or audio plays and as toy merchandise: Struwwelpeter by Heinrich Hoffmann – a cruel classic. Oh, wie schön ist Panama and other stories by Janosch – You can hardly consider yourself German if you don’t know what a Tigerente ...


4

The video you linked to does not have subtitles (and isn’t marked as such, either, at least nowhere that I looked). For videos that have subtitles, there is a “UT” button in the player that may be used to toggle subtitles. An example of this can be seen in the following screenshot: „Seite 150“ refers to Teletext page 150 during regular broadcast. It is ...


4

There is nothing wrong with Hubert Schölnast's answer, but here is my take, which is a bit shorter. Salzburg is on the border between Germany (Bavaria) and Austria today. In Mozart's time it was a member of the Holy Roman Empire in much the same way as Bavaria and Austria; it only became Austrian more than a decade after his death. Vienna, where most of ...


3

Since this question is specifically about German, I will not give any of the answers that apply to (almost) every foreign language. In these respects German probably has about medium difficulty overall, and is perhaps even on the easy side for English speakers. The greatest challenge may be the different word order — especially if you find German harder to ...


3

I don't think that there is any song or poem to remember the case endings. However, I cannot be sure since to prove the absence of something is often much harder than to prove its existence. ;-) In the end the only mnemonic aid is a table similar to the one that E.V. posted in her/his answer. But: It isn't as hard as it looks at first glance. There are ...


2

Es gibt immer wieder Leute, die behaupten, Sprache X sei einfach und Sprache Y sei schwer zu erlernen. Kurioserweise widersprechen sie sich meistens in der Frage, welche Sprachen einfach sind, während zu vermeintlich schwere Sprachen oft Einigkeit herrscht (solange nicht eine der Diskutanten diese Sprache als einfach kategorisiert). Dabei sehe ich jedoch ...


2

Here is a link to a project (Book2) where you can hear or download 100 exercises (common situations for novices i think) even in Persian-German: http://www.goethe-verlag.com/book2/FA/FADE/FADE002.HTM The online exercises are limited (demo only), but you can download the complete mp3 files for free there (native speaker - man and woman): ...


2

The usual sheet music is written with the modern spelling, e.g. with any y of replaced by i in the quote of the first aria of the Könnigin der Nacht. I dare saying, that it's even harder to find the old text. My first contact with German was precisely opera, and I wouldn't have learned the language without that motivation (not meaning that it's not worth, ...


1

Well, to learn vocabulary and grammar in a class is boring and strenuous. My method is different. I begin with simplest children's stories for 5-year-old children. These stories are interesting, they are illustrated in colours with one or two sentences on each page and they are short. Furthermore they often contain dialogues. Of course, I need a dictionary ...


1

Well, the answer is probably the same for any language: learn the vocabulary and grammar in a class. But besides books and people in class, there is something that I found very good for learning English and it sure applies also for German: Watch TV series on DVD. The reasons for this are as follows: A TV series runs longer than a movie. This gives you time ...


1

I suggest you check out Adlung Games, a small independent board game studio that focuses exclusively on card games. They developed many of their games together with professional educators, therapists, teachers etc., and do a lot of testing with their "target demographic group" - but always with the focus of "must be fun", never the "obvious training ...


1

I don't think that such a course would help you to understand and keep up with the German spoken (or rather sung) in the opera. I am native Austrian and I don't even understand everything when they are singing.


1

German-English Collins Pro Dictionary just run a quick Search. They do have a special Mac Version and last time I checked it was offered as a download.


1

Here's what my teacher did: - on rectangular small bits of paper, she had the certain masculine, feminine, and neuter endings, only one on each. (Then the more typical, but not a rule endings.) Masculine -ig -er -ismus -ant -ist More typical masculine -ich -ing -ling -or -us -ast -est (double check) Feminine -e -heit/keit -schaft -ung (there's ...


1

I think the biggest problem of understanding German sentences is the problem of... long distances In German it happens very often, that parts of a sentence, that logically belong together are spread wide across a sentence: separable verbs "to spend money" is in German "Geld ausgeben". "Ausgeben" is a separable verb, who's components "aus" and "geben" can ...


1

It is very important to understand that the gender of a noun is the most important element to learn when learning the German language. Without knowing the gender of a noun, it is impossible to properly form a sentence correctly. If the course fails to include the article when teaching nouns, it should be avoided. For example, if the course only teaches you ...


1

Many foreigners find the very loose word order in Dutch/German a challenge, specially the absence of a fixed place for verb and subject. That includes English speakers to a degree since modern English is quite regular in that aspect. So word order is definitely something you take from Dutch to German. If you speak a south-eastern dialect like Limburgs, add ...


1

There is a news site in "leichter Sprache" called nachrichtenleicht.de (simple language) which might be good for a novice, since they use a limited vocabulary. They also provide audio that is spoken very slowly. The public radio Deutschlandradio provides its broadcasts as transcripts and as audio, but they will be challenging for a beginner.


1

It is for children, but I think that fairy tales are a good audio to improve your listening. Nearly everyone in Germany knows the fairy tales of Gebrüder Grimm. And I think they are easy to understand. Even if you do not understand every word it is easy to catch the message. Examples: Hänsel und Gretel, Hans im Glück, Rapunzel, ... Here is a link: ...


1

This is the way I did it. I used this summery and with time I practised, practised and practised. Making mistaked all the time and being corrected. I have no "easier" way to suggest



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