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22

Mozart's German Mozart himself didn't write any of the texts (libretti) of his operas. He "only" wrote the music after a given text. And more than 70% of his operas are in Italian language (one, Apollo et Hyacinthus, KV 38, is even written in Latin). There are only four Mozart-operas with German libretti (five, if you also count the fragment Zaide, which ...


10

After 67 years of teaching a form of cursive ("Schnüerlischrift"), Swiss authorities have recommended substituting it with block letters for all schools in German-speaking Switzerland. As all fonts have slight differences, choosing one common set of letters is important for the benefit of learners. The suggested style is the Luzerner Basisschrift. It's use ...


5

There is nothing wrong with Hubert Schölnast's answer, but here is my take, which is a bit shorter. Salzburg is on the border between Germany (Bavaria) and Austria today. In Mozart's time it was a member of the Holy Roman Empire in much the same way as Bavaria and Austria; it only became Austrian more than a decade after his death. Vienna, where most of ...


4

If comics and illustrated stories count I’d like to add some (from the past 40ish years), most of which also come as movies, TV series or audio plays and as toy merchandise: Struwwelpeter by Heinrich Hoffmann – a cruel classic. Oh, wie schön ist Panama and other stories by Janosch – You can hardly consider yourself German if you don’t know what a Tigerente ...


4

The video you linked to does not have subtitles (and isn’t marked as such, either, at least nowhere that I looked). For videos that have subtitles, there is a “UT” button in the player that may be used to toggle subtitles. An example of this can be seen in the following screenshot: „Seite 150“ refers to Teletext page 150 during regular broadcast. It is ...


3

The usual sheet music is written with the modern spelling, e.g. with any y of replaced by i in the quote of the first aria of the Könnigin der Nacht. I dare saying, that it's even harder to find the old text. My first contact with German was precisely opera, and I wouldn't have learned the language without that motivation (not meaning that it's not worth, ...


3

I don't think that there is any song or poem to remember the case endings. However, I cannot be sure since to prove the absence of something is often much harder than to prove its existence. ;-) In the end the only mnemonic aid is a table similar to the one that E.V. posted in her/his answer. But: It isn't as hard as it looks at first glance. There are ...


3

Since this question is specifically about German, I will not give any of the answers that apply to (almost) every foreign language. In these respects German probably has about medium difficulty overall, and is perhaps even on the easy side for English speakers. The greatest challenge may be the different word order — especially if you find German harder to ...


2

Here is a link to a project (Book2) where you can hear or download 100 exercises (common situations for novices i think) even in Persian-German: http://www.goethe-verlag.com/book2/FA/FADE/FADE002.HTM The online exercises are limited (demo only), but you can download the complete mp3 files for free there (native speaker - man and woman): ...


2

As other commenters mentioned, you will have difficulty finding a similar book for German because this method is simply not how we teach living languages anymore. You might be able to find a similar method if you look for books that were published until the 1960s. If you just want a solid grammar reference with exercises, I'd recommend Dreyer & ...


2

Here in Austria, English as school subject ususally starts at 1st grade (age 6 or 7)* and stays till the end of school, i.e. age 18 or 19. It's not uncommon to get some English courses in kindergarden, too. As stated in the comments to the question, the same goes for Germany. *originally, I claimed it would be 3rd grade, but Hubert corrected me in the ...


2

When I went to school in Thüringen in Germany in the 90s, I officially started English when I entered Gymnasium (grammar school, in my case with scientific emphasis) in grade 5 (year 5). English was mandatory up to and including 10th grade (10th year). Further languages would start around grade 7 (French, Latin, Russian). For grade 11 and 12, one could ...


1

Like user ammoQ I only can talk about Austria. I was born in 1965 in Austria and started school at the age of 6, in September 1971. I did not attend any preschool or kindergarten, this was not usual in rural regions (but is usual now). Like almost all people who are at my age (round 50), I started learning english in 5th grade, when I was 10. This was ...


1

Here's a list with interlinear translated word for word aligned books in German (third one already mentioned in one of the answers above): Brothers Grimm - German Fairy Tales (with audio) Kafka, Storm and others - German Short Stories (with audio) Herman Hesse - Demian, on Lulu.com Herman Hesse - Kinderseele, on Lulu.com Franz Kafka - Die Verwandlung, ...


1

Any possible answer depends on your actual level. Assuming you’re a beginner, and you’re looking for a grammatical and systematic approach, I’d suggest you get yourself a concise German grammar and a list of the most important words, preferably including example sentences (like many beginner’s dictionaries offer). Study the grammar and basic vocabulary. You ...


1

There are great, advanced, modern specialized textbooks in German. Consulting just one of them in your specialty field will help you immensely. The icing on the cake would be a book with an English translation. As a first example, in algebraic geometry/commutative algebra one has Kunz's Einführung in die kommutative Algebra und algebraische Geometrie, ...


1

Well, to learn vocabulary and grammar in a class is boring and strenuous. My method is different. I begin with simplest children's stories for 5-year-old children. These stories are interesting, they are illustrated in colours with one or two sentences on each page and they are short. Furthermore they often contain dialogues. Of course, I need a dictionary ...


1

Well, the answer is probably the same for any language: learn the vocabulary and grammar in a class. But besides books and people in class, there is something that I found very good for learning English and it sure applies also for German: Watch TV series on DVD. The reasons for this are as follows: A TV series runs longer than a movie. This gives you time ...


1

I suggest you check out Adlung Games, a small independent board game studio that focuses exclusively on card games. They developed many of their games together with professional educators, therapists, teachers etc., and do a lot of testing with their "target demographic group" - but always with the focus of "must be fun", never the "obvious training ...


1

A simple analogy would be for a modern English learner to read Shakespeare. His language would possibly not be easily comprehensible in any way.


1

The requirements for mathematics texts in German from the point of view of the vocabulary are small for modern texts, somewhat higher for older books. However, I think the main task you will have at the beginning is to understand the particular jargon mathematicians use all the time. For that it might be useful to look into books which are meant for future ...


1

I don't think that such a course would help you to understand and keep up with the German spoken (or rather sung) in the opera. I am native Austrian and I don't even understand everything when they are singing.


1

German-English Collins Pro Dictionary just run a quick Search. They do have a special Mac Version and last time I checked it was offered as a download.


1

Here's what my teacher did: - on rectangular small bits of paper, she had the certain masculine, feminine, and neuter endings, only one on each. (Then the more typical, but not a rule endings.) Masculine -ig -er -ismus -ant -ist More typical masculine -ich -ing -ling -or -us -ast -est (double check) Feminine -e -heit/keit -schaft -ung (there's ...


1

I think the biggest problem of understanding German sentences is the problem of... long distances In German it happens very often, that parts of a sentence, that logically belong together are spread wide across a sentence: separable verbs "to spend money" is in German "Geld ausgeben". "Ausgeben" is a separable verb, who's components "aus" and "geben" can ...


1

This is the way I did it. I used this summery and with time I practised, practised and practised. Making mistaked all the time and being corrected. I have no "easier" way to suggest


1

It is very important to understand that the gender of a noun is the most important element to learn when learning the German language. Without knowing the gender of a noun, it is impossible to properly form a sentence correctly. If the course fails to include the article when teaching nouns, it should be avoided. For example, if the course only teaches you ...


1

There is a news site in "leichter Sprache" called nachrichtenleicht.de (simple language) which might be good for a novice, since they use a limited vocabulary. They also provide audio that is spoken very slowly. The public radio Deutschlandradio provides its broadcasts as transcripts and as audio, but they will be challenging for a beginner.


1

It is for children, but I think that fairy tales are a good audio to improve your listening. Nearly everyone in Germany knows the fairy tales of Gebrüder Grimm. And I think they are easy to understand. Even if you do not understand every word it is easy to catch the message. Examples: Hänsel und Gretel, Hans im Glück, Rapunzel, ... Here is a link: ...



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