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9

Beside the already mentioned "Um die Ecke gedacht" I'd like to recommend the crosswords in the "Süddeutsche Magazin". Looking at your description of the NYT crosswords I would give it a Thursday or Friday difficulty. They provide solutions for the crossword of the previous week with comments - might be useful to get acquainted with the style and help ...


8

Since homecoming is an expression that has - to my knowledge - no counterpart in German, I would say something like Willst du mit mir zum Homecoming gehen? You could also use Hast du Lust, mit mir zum Homecoming zu gehen? Or, very politely Ich würde mich freuen, wenn du mich zum Homecoming begleitest/begleiten würdest. Update: I would ...


6

Ä There's no obvious difference in pronouncing Ärzte or Ärmel. As for ätzend, the ä is slightly more "e-like" than the usual ä, as it is a short vowel. Ä is close in pronunciation to the a in that or cap - an a pronounced more "e-like". Ö Is pronounced like the u in purse or the e in Perth. EDIT: It is possible to practice the ö by forming an o with your ...


5

From personal experience: TV: The German state channels have big media libraries with tv shows. Start watching them with subtitles to get familiar with the language (If you like crime check the "Tatort" series). ARD: http://www.ardmediathek.de/tv ZDF: http://www.zdf.de/ZDFmediathek . Self-Learning: For a head start try the Tim Ferriss method: Learn ...


4

For online courses, I highly recommend Duolingo (especially if you're a relative beginner) - it's entirely free and without ads as well. I honestly wouldn't even consider paying money for an online course / language learning software before trying Duolingo and seeing if it works for you. Also, as you get more advanced, you can use the Immersion area and ...


4

Many German DVDs (or similar) of anglophone movies come with a German and English audio track and at least German subtitles. You should always check the specifications though. Though I have no experience with documentaries in specific, I do not see why this should not hold for those. The only annoyance might be that you have to import these from Germany and ...


4

If your problem is only to remember which is which, then it might help to know the origin of or related words to at least one of them. It is probably not a coincidence that none of the four words that you mention have cognates in English that I am aware of. But as you are Italian, it should help to know that “Schüssel” is probably derived from Latin and I ...


4

In casual speech I would also consider "Ehemaligentreffen" ("formers' gathering") the correct term – if you relate to people you were studying with. This type of event can either be an official gathering of students, invited by their university – or an inofficial at some bar – or everything inbetween. The rather formal term "Alumnitreffen" ("alumni ...


4

If the homecoming you are referring to is with or in honor of alumni, the closest German translation that comes to my mind is das Ehemaligentreffen. If you enter Homecoming combined with Ehemaligentreffen in Google, you'll find some hits where German universities invite to their Ehemaligentreffen and also mention the term homecoming. So for the whole ...


3

Well, there's not really a rule in which order you should learn tenses, but in general–disregarding the actual language–I would learn both a future and a past tense. That basically allows you to convey if something happened in the past, happens right now or is going to happen. Luckily, in German you can express future with Präsens. Thus, you can focus on ...


3

It is not easy to explain the special vowels of German, which traditionally are called Umlaute. But I remember having explained the articulation of ü to an American young man. My explanation was as follows: Say a long /i/ and keep your tongue in this i-position, i. e. the tongue is near the palate. Now round your lips strongly and push your lips forward as ...


3

Collect such examples under the heading "Similar words (I tend to mix up)". Note down the two words and try to get some good sentences from dictionaries. If you read this collection now and again it should help. If you find out that this is not enough you write down the difficult pair a second time, with new examples. I have made the experience that learning ...


3

I would add the Deutsche Welle website, www.dw.de - there are courses and materials for A1 (Beginners) level students and beyond, an it's free to boot.


2

There can be many reasons for this (NB: I am not familiar with either show). I wouldn't rule out regional dialects (or speech variants or patterns, subtle as they may seem), or just the city the series are set in. It can make a huge difference, even for native speakers (I live in Austria, which is a very small market. If and when a TV show is exported to ...


2

Have you tried Livemocha? From their website: The world’s largest online language learning community, Livemocha fuses traditional learning methods with online practice and interaction with native language speakers from around the world There you'll have the oportunity to interact with native speakers and watch them engage in conversations. P.S. It's ...


2

The first problem to solve: find German movies for which German subtitles have been produced at all. Who would use them? Beside learners like you, it's mainly hearing impaired people, and they are not the most influential customer group... I checked out the titles that you listed - only 3 of them have DVD editions with German subtitles (Das Boot, Der Himmel ...


2

Es gibt immer wieder Leute, die behaupten, Sprache X sei einfach und Sprache Y sei schwer zu erlernen. Kurioserweise widersprechen sie sich meistens in der Frage, welche Sprache einfach sind, während zu vermeindlich schwere Sprachen oft Einigkeit herrscht (solange nicht eine der Diskutanten diese Sprache als einfach kategorisiert). Dabei sehe ich jedoch ...


1

Many foreigners find the very loose word order in Dutch/German a challenge, specially the absence of a fixed place for verb and subject. That includes English speakers to a degree since modern English is quite regular in that aspect. So word order is definitely something you take from Dutch to German. If you speak a south-eastern dialect like Limburgs, add ...


1

From my own experience in learning the language, there is this small difference between the "rule" and the "used". In the Germany language, you will find so many rules, and for EACH rule you definitely find an exception. Being said, I would suggest you to learn the prepositions in the language in a context. Never translate it or just memorise it with one ...


1

You shouldn't expect support for subtitles from online video streaming. I had a similar idea and didn't find video streaming with subtitles. I'm 100% certain that lovefilm.de is not supporting it. My suggestion is renting DVDs. Often DVDs have more than one audio track and subtitles in various languages. At least in Europe this is the case. Anyway, if you ...


1

If what you mean by scientific German is the German Bildungssprache, a recorded lecture in any subject will be an ideal resource. There is a website which offers MOOCs in German and I am sure you can find more resources of this kind. If you don't care about the content and just want a lot of very beautiful, sophisticated and precise German, I recommend ...


1

I did write it as a comment before: I don't think that a translated list makes much sense since most of the German words (if not all) can be translated to much more then just one English word (and vice versa). See, what I mean: These are the top 10 from the original list of the most frequent words in written German (spoken words are not counted): ...


1

Your chances highly depend on which company you apply to. Usually companies with branches in english speaking countries are more likely to employ english speaking workers (the Company I'm currently working in resently build a branch in america and employs 4 workers, one of which works here in Germany with us), so all companys you mentioned are likely to ...


1

I'm using courses from http://www.babbel.com/. They grouped by themes and levels, you can immediately use it in the real life conversations.


1

My recommendation is based on exact same method I use for learning French and Spanish and I am convinced it works with German, too: Start with Duolingo: I can really recommend duolingo. It makes learning languages (also others) a game and encourages you to study a little every day. Also, I find it is more fun than most other systems/apps. Once you are on a ...



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