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Of course they are still useful. Languages generally change slowly. The more formal the register, the slower the change. The latest slang may have changed, but such books generally don't attempt to cover slang anyway. Even 19th century texts are not that different, just as in English.


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If what you mean by scientific German is the German Bildungssprache, a recorded lecture in any subject will be an ideal resource. There is a website which offers MOOCs in German and I am sure you can find more resources of this kind. If you don't care about the content and just want a lot of very beautiful, sophisticated and precise German, I recommend ...


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Wenn du die Konstruktion nicht weißt, hilt dir die Frage wem/wen überhaupt nicht. Man muß im Lexikon nachschauen, wie das Verb gehören konstruiert wird: etwas gehört mir (Dativ). Deine Lehrerin hätte dir also sagen müssen, nach "gehören" steht der Dativ der Person. Übrigens genau wie im Englischen: something belongs to me and not: something belongs me.


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I did write it as a comment before: I don't think that a translated list makes much sense since most of the German words (if not all) can be translated to much more then just one English word (and vice versa). See, what I mean: These are the top 10 from the original list of the most frequent words in written German (spoken words are not counted): ...



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