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46

I suggest LEO.org — in Germany it's heavily used for the translation of English words into German and vice versa. There are also forums which help translate whole sentences and idioms. The site also has pronunciation and declination tables for most words (including the English ones). It also includes dictionaries between German and other languages than ...


28

Aside from LEO, I often find dict.cc to be quite handy.


18

While it doesn't have much etymological content, I have found the dict.tu-chemnitz.de dictionary to be very good, especially because it has many examples and phrases.


13

I sometimes look at linguee. They use human translated bilingual texts to suggest translations.


12

Here is a good overview of all the German articles. Der bestimmte Artikel Kasus | männlich | weiblich | sächlich | Plural ---------------------------------------------------- Nominativ | der | die | das | die Genitiv | des | der | des | der Dativ | dem | der | dem | den Akkusativ | den | die ...


6

A site that explains Austrian words and phrases in ordinary German: http://www.ostarrichi.org/woerterbuch.html


5

The way the question is asked right now leaves only one answer: yes. There are many groups in which the gender is not conserved because there is no such rule. der Mensch: die Frau, das Kind, der Mann das Tier: der Löwe, die Hornisse,.. der Baum: die Eiche, die Ulme, die Birke,... das chemische Element: der Phosphor, das Blei,... And ...


4

Weird that nobody has mentioned Google Translate so far. Since I got to know linguee, that and Google translate have made Leo obsolete for me.


4

My last case scenario: Google Image search Sometimes a dictionary just doesn't cut it, especially for regional food specialities


3

25. Ausgabe (2009) Mehr als 5000 neu aufgenommene Wörter, insgesamt rund 135.000 Stichwörter. Einige Beispiele: Abwrackprämie, After-Show-Party, Angsthäsin, armutsgefährdet, aufstarten (schweiz.), Aufstocker, Aufstockerin, ausschnapsen, austillen, Babyblues, Bad Bank, Barfußpfad, Bedienungstheke, Best-of, B-Führerschein, Bioethikkommission, Blaufahrer, ...


3

In addition, I'm using the terminology database of the European Union, IATE, for technical and buerocratic terms. For an example, try to feed it a word widely used in various fields of terminology, such as dove-tail. Link: Inter-Active Terminology for Europe Original Text: Zu ergänzen sind vielleicht noch Dictionaries zu Fachbegriffen. Relativ häufig ...


3

I like using WordReference, which has an English <=> German dictionary as well as forums about specific word usage. Duden is also free online now.


2

As mru said, dict.leo.org is a good place to start. Then, there is dict.cc which I also use frequently. If you're interested in the etymology of a word, you can take a look at the German site of Wiktionary. Or, also online available, there is Duden.


2

dict.cc translates single words and lots of phrases. Most words have pronunciation contributed by users.


2

Das ist definitiv falsch, egal ob Maria und Peter die Eltern sind oder nicht: Ich widme dieses Buch meinen Eltern, Maria, und Peter. Aus diesem Satz kann man zweiflesfrei schließen, dass Maria und Peter nicht mit den Eltern identisch sind: Ich widme dieses Buch meinen Eltern, sowie Maria und Peter. Das hier ist doppelt gemoppelt. Wenn du ...


2

Meiner Meinung nach gilt hier einfach die erste Regel: Vor einem „und“, das Teile einer Aufzählung abgrenzt, steht kein Komma. Mehrdeutigkeit lässt sich nie komplett ausschließen; im Zweifelsfall sollte man den Satz umformulieren.


2

Es ist anzunehmen, dass der Autor aller drei Sätze weiß, was er meint: Sind Maria und Peter seine Eltern oder zwei zusätzliche Personen? Wenn Maria und Peter die Eltern des Autors sind, kann man das Problem umgehen, indem man die Reihenfolge ändert: "Ich widme dieses Buch Maria und Peter, meinen Eltern." Damit ist zwar nicht ausgeschlossen, dass es sich um ...


1

Beside the already mentioned Wikipedia article I found Wieselwort on WkiMANNia, which also contains a list of examples. I can also recommend (particularly when you are interested in clear language) reading Deutsch für Profis by Wolf Schneider. He doesn't use the word "Wieselwort", but in the first 5 chapters he critizes deceptive use of German language by ...


1

For me one of the most amazing dictionaries is: http://de.thefreedictionary.com/ You get the word definition in German and with examples taken from three different dictionaries Different meanings for the same word are clearly explained and marked. Even frequent/non frequent uses are color coded (green/red) At the end there is a section with the ...


1

Collins offers: Concise German Dictionary Online (paid subscription) German-English Dictionary (free; “Beta” at the time of writing [December 2011])


1

There’s Oxford Language Dictionaries Online, which is the online version of the paper Oxford German Dictionary. A paid subscription is required.


1

Bab.la is fantastic as it shows contexts of words in actual sentences and has a much clearer layout than Leo.



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