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13

First of all, there is no clear scheme after which the genders of loanwords are determined (see also this question). Even with words that are in the process of being loaned right now, native speakers find it hard to agree on the gender (e.g., I have seen any gender for Blog) and even if they do, it’s hard to pinpoint the reason. But let’s have a look at ...


6

Ich hab im IDS-Korpus (Cosmas II) eine kurze Recherche gemacht mit einer schnellen Auswertung; für eine wissenschaftlichere Auswertung habe ich momentan leider keine Zeit. Zwei Tendenzen sind aber recht eindeutig, was die Phrase »Das ist nicht fair« betrifft: Im Verhältnis zu ihrem Gegenteil »Das ist fair« wird sie wesentlich frequenter verwendet (ca. ...


6

Die offiziellen Rechtschreibregeln lassen hier recht viel Spielraum zu: § 110 Steht in einfachen oder suffigierten Wörtern zwischen Vokalbuchstaben ein einzelner Konsonantenbuchstabe, so kommt er bei der Trennung auf die neue Zeile. Stehen mehrere Konsonantenbuchstaben dazwischen, so kommt nur der letzte auf die neue Zeile. Beispiele: Au-ge, […] ...


5

The claim comes from the fact that Proto-Indo-European has a glaring lack of sounds said to be a voice bilabial stop */b/ (this would also include that sound in initial position in a word). The reflex of this sound would be /p/ in Germanic languages (and further changed to the sound /pf/ in certain places in certain German dialects). There is a lot of truth ...


5

-or Rein technisch kann an lateinische PPP-Stämme* -or angehängt werden. Fast immer bezeichnet man damit jemanden oder etwas, der oder das die im Stamm ausgedrückte Handlung betreibt. Beispiele: Infinitiv Präsens | PPP | -or | Bedeutung ------------------+------------+-----------+------------------------ vincere | victus | ...


3

In most cases it is really simple: You are almost NEVER forced to use any other grammar but German grammar when terms from foreign countries are embedded in German sentences. Otherwise you had to learn the grammar from every language of the world to build proper german sentences including foreign terms. A few examples: The word "Kimono" is from Japanese ...


2

As Ingmar's answer already covers the usage in current times, I want to lose a few words on why the Latin declension was used in earlier times. Even until the early 18th century, Latin was the language of choice for academic purposes. The wikipedia article in German wikipedia has some nice information on that too: Generationen von Kindern lernten seit ...


2

By and large, German declination is used, in particular if there is a loan word, like Kollegium in your example. Only occasionally will you hear somebody use the "correct" Latin declination, and then usually in a professional (legal, e.g.) or academic context. Lawyers might say something like "der Brief Doktoris Mueller" (the letter of Dr. Mueller) or "die ...


2

Laut Duden stand es im Buch korrekt, also Gue-ril-la-krieg: Worttrennung: Gue|ril|la|krieg Siehe auch: http://de.thefreedictionary.com/Guerilla http://de.pons.com/%C3%BCbersetzung/deutsch-englisch/Guerilla http://www.silbentrennung24.de/?term=Guerilla Da wir das "ll" nicht typisch deutsch aussprechen, sondern meist wie "lj", ist die Trennung an dieser ...


2

Duden lists a few alternatives (http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/fair). But first, we should think about context. We're not talking about a game here with set rules, but of social interaction, in which a certain behaviour does not violate set rules, but rules seen as common, at least by one party. Given that, I see three fitting words: gerecht ...


1

Im Google Ngram Viewer taucht das Wort "fair" zuerst 1732 auf, "unfair" sogar 1727 und "Fairness" 1862. Alle drei sind seit dem späten 19. Jahrhundert in stets zunehmendem Gebrauch. Nach fast 300 Jahren Gebrauch empfindet kein Deutscher das Wort "fair" und seine Ableitungen mehr als fremd.


1

@Marty: Das ist unfair! Das ist ungerecht! I think most negations are done by prefixing "un-" instead of using "nicht". At least when you use it as a normal statement. If you read somewhere "Das ist nicht fair!", it is like putting emphasis on the last two words and saying them slower to make sure the other person understands it is really not fair. The ...


1

Using English words can be really popular among some people. Unfortunately, in some cases it can be exaggerated, especially in the form of 'Denglish' and if coming from the ones who try to come over as young and hip without necessarily being so, ie. managers and big corporations (Deutsche Bahn is a prime example). You might enjoy this article: ...


1

Unless the word has a clearly defined gender, you usually use the article of the German translation. e.g. the star -- means "der Stern" in German so if you use it like: superstar --> der Superstar Also, in German in a compound-noun, such as Superstar, the article is always defined by the LAST partial word, which is star in this case. so ...


1

I just tried thinking about "Die Bikini" and it just hurts. Same if you think about "der Kappe". But we have "Die Hose" und "Der Hut." Wir haben Anzug, Badeanzug und Badehose. Die Hose = Die Badehose Der Anzug, Der Badeanzug, Bikini, der Badeanzug mit weniger Stoff für Frauen. Aber die Bikinihose das Bikinihöschen und das Bikini - Oberteil. Aber "Der BH". ...



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