Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

In most cases in physics, act on sth. is translated by auf etw. wirken. So the phrase is: Der Impulsoperator p wirkt auf das Ket |ψ>. For example, in this Wikipedia article you can read: In der Impulsdarstellung wirkt der Impulsoperator multiplikativ auf Impulswellenfunktionen [...]. Another possible construction I can think of is auf etw. ...


8

There seems to be no equally used German counterpart as I have often heard (and used) the English “hand waving” while conversing about mathematics in German.


5

When I was studying maths at university, "Beweis durch Händewedeln" was in use, but that describes a very very vague "proof" in the sense of "it can be easily seen that theorem 1.2 applies together with lemma 2.3, and the details are left as an exercise for the reader". For "proofs" the appeal to intuition or common sense, I'd use "Beweis durch Anschauung" ...


5

Depending on the nature of the handwaving, one of the following may fit: Ein salopper Beweis – It’s what I prefer to use in such a situation, though I usually apply it to certain steps of a proof and not the proof as a whole. It particular fits proof that omit technical details and apply to intuition, visualisation or examples. Ein formloser Beweis – A ...


4

The exact same thing happens in English. One would say: Let ψn(x) be the characteristic function of the Hamiltonian operator Ĥ. This has a different meaning than: ψn(x) is the characteristic function of the Hamiltonian operator Ĥ.


3

(1.b) und (2.a) "gehen gar nicht". (1.a) und (2.b) sind eindeutig, können mündlich problemlos benutzt werden, und (2.b) hört sich auch flüssig an. Allerdings sollten in einem gesetzten Text nicht zwei Formeln direkt aufeinander folgen, so dass Du etwas dazwischen einfügen musst, zum Beispiel Daher enthält $B$ die Menge $A$. Und wenn wir schon Wörter ...


2

I quite disagree. 1.b and 2.a read horribly. 1.a and 2.b are much preferable even though they juxtapose subject and object with no case markers. I agree that a way should be sought to make those sentences flow better, but not by reordering. You might say "Daher enthält A das Element B", or "woraus folgt: P impliziert Q." or even "Daraus folgt: P impliziert ...


1

I have come across the kind of expression that you mean once in a while, but never ever outside mathematical (or strictly logical) context. It is a very specific form sometimes used in the way of seeing the logical expression (p impliziert q) in its role as the expression of a thought, and not in its role of being a grammatical part of a sentence. Like a ...


1

Canoo.net hat eine Flexionstabelle für irreduzibel. (Ein Wort, was ich übrigens nicht kenne.) Beachte, dass Adjektive unterschiedlich dekliniert werden, je nachdem ob sie mit bestimmten, unbestimmten oder ohne Artikel stehen. Hier eine vollständige Auflistung für irreduzibel, hoffentlich ohne Tippfehler: Starke Flexion ohne Artikel Männlich ...


1

In mathematics you often set up a situation with this kind of phrase - often to express the logical link: If ... then .... In German, using the example of the question it looks like this: Die Funktionen ψn(x) seien Eigenfunktionen eines Hamiltonoperators Ĥ. Dann gilt ...


1

I have seen the adjective hemdsärmelig used in this case.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible