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-1

As I can't imagine that there is absolutely no connection between picture and inscription I would, judging by your description of the picture, rather make an educated guess in the direction of courtly love where the Troubadours have to woo for the favor of their sweetheart. And the choice of the mistress is strongly biased and influenced by the skills of ...


4

The inscription would be Erst prob's, dann lob's! meaning "try it first, then praise it." It seems a pretty common inscription for German biersteins.


2

The inscription should read: Erst prob’s, dann lob’s. It is a saying recommending to first try something (proben, probieren) before (possibly) appraising it. Regarding the pictures, I don’t think they are related to the inscription specifically. A web search for the phrase turns up quite a number of steins with varying decorations.


0

The expression so wie is an elliptic (where something is missing, albeit fully understandable) form of so … wie. Das Gras ist grün, so (grün) wie ein Frosch. Im Sommer tragen Frauen einen Rock, so (einen Rock) wie Jana. And of course only exceptionally one would use the explicit form. Im Sommer tragen Frauen gern einen leichten Rock, ein ...


4

No. Don't confuse so wie with so ... wie .... Er ist so klug wie Jana. => He is as smart as Jana. In your sentence, it's translated with like or as. In summer, women wear skirts, T-shirts or tops — like Jana. In summer, women wear skirts, T-shirts or tops — as Jana does.


2

Technically, um … willen is a circumposition. A circumposition is, in essence, the same thing as a preposition; but a preposition comes before its so-called complement whereas a circumposition surrounds it. Finally, there are postpositions, following after their complement. Because postpositions and circumpositions are quite rare in German (and in English), ...


0

um Himmels Willen -> um des Himmels Willen -> um den Willen des Himmels um den Willen -> prepositional complement + des Himmels -> posessive complement to the prepositional complement Remains of a complete sentence that sometime in the past must have been something like (and I am making up this part) e.g. Ich bitte dich -> [um den Willen des Himmels] -> ...


1

The Duden states it's a preposition. It's used with a genitive. And it derived from Wille (will) as its accusative singular. I don't know how to translate erstarrt (solidified) correctly. But I would apprechiate its correct translation very much! Wortart: Präposition Häufigkeit: ▮▮▮▯▯ Herkunft: eigentlich erstarrter Akkusativ Singular von Wille Grammatik: ...


0

"Geht es auch 15 Uhr?" is not at all unusual in colloquial German, but I would consider it slightly improper. It feels like a blend of the following more correct questions: Geht es auch um 15 Uhr? - Literal translation: Does it [= the appointment we are in the process of making] also work at 3 p.m.? Geht auch 15 Uhr? - Literal translation: Does 3 ...


-1

It should be Geht es auch 15 Uhr?, i e there should be a question mark. It means Does 3 pm work, too?


7

Wiktionary definition 11: funktionieren, machbar sein Duden definition 10a: sich machen lassen; möglich sein Gehen in that sense is likely translated as to work. Does 3 PM work for you? Yes, that works for me.


3

Etwas geht is another way of saying etwas ist möglich (something is possible).


5

Your translation sounds good. The meaning of "zu" is that the cap is going well (or not so well, depending on personal opinion and taste) with trousers and waistcoat. […] wore a blue pointed cap [bag cap?] assorted with his green trousers and red waistcoat. might reflect the meaning in English, and […] portait un bonnet pointu bleu assorti à son ...


2

-"Zusammen" in this cas is not an adverb but a part of the verb "zusammenleben". when you conjucate it in the past it gives " sie lebten zusammen". -"glücklich miteinander" is to insist that they are happy because they live together


2

This is a pleonasm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleonasm). Its semanticly correct (Typo already said) from Medi Saif: "Sie wurden gute Freunde und lebten glücklich miteinander zusammen It makes the aspect stronger, that they lived TOGETHER.


2

Well to me it seems that the story is a tale and this tale has been manipulated/simplified to a version with very easy vocabulary this is one important point. One can say the reading voice is reading in a strange manner, but maybe it's just that she isn't used to as for little children and beginners one should read and pronounce carefully this is a ...


5

You could say, "children [...] don't give a damn about the worries and problems of adults."


2

It generally means that you really don't care about something or are really inconsiderate (in a conscious way). So in this case it means that the children are inconsiderate about the worries and problems of adults :)


-2

Bitte is please and also you’re welcome. Sehen as you spelt it was short for Wiedersehen. I’ve noticed here in Austria they sometimes put words together. So the shopkeeper was saying “You’re welcome and goodbye” in one word. Just nod, smile and wave casually to acknowledge him.



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