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gier probably means it is somehow messy, here is an example for ships that are tumbling around: http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/gieren_schwanken On first read the "nothing left" @tofro mentions made sense to me, like it describes some wasteland. But the whole "gier and gar" seems to be related to Fieberhauch, not to the floor. But never heard that ...


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I guess (also from the "bissig und bös" question) the poem you're translating is Yvan Goll's "Der Panama-Kanal". "gier und gar" actually is not an idiom in German, and a literal translation along the lines of greed and cooked doesn't make any sense - not even to a native speaker. gar has a meaning in some southern German dialects and Austrian German of ...


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I never heard of it before and your post is the only hit in an online search... Maybe you mean "ganz und gar". That just means "completely", "totally", ... "without leftovers".


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Bissig relates to the verb "beissen" - So it's actually biting. "Böss" should be "böse" - so "bad", or "evil" (your "naughty" is not wrong, though) The whole thing, provided it relates to animals, as you said, thus is best translated to biting and bad In relation to humans, the translation would probably be a bit different, like snappy and evil ...


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The word "Pflaster" originated form the word "emplastron" which was a band-aid with salve on it. Because of the covering and protecting characteristics of a band-aid the word was then used for the pavement covering the streets. Since the 19th century the word is "Pars pro toto", meaning "a part (taken) for the whole".


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The expression ein teures/gefährliches/heisses/... Pflaster comes from former times, when only city roads had cobblestone (Pflastersteine) pavements and thus refers to city roads, therefore - the city, or a place in a city. It should be mentioned this only works in a number of idioms as above: Ein historisches Pflaster to describe a historic city ...


3

Der Satz ist (bis auf einen kleinen Fehler: »Ansätzen« statt »Ansätze«) grammatisch korrekt, aber durch die vielen Aufzählungen und Einschübe etwas kompliziert und daher für viele Leser schwer verständlich. Außerdem enthält er eine Konstruktion, die sich unterschiedlich interpretieren lässt, was vor allem in Bezug auf die Wahl von Singular oder Plural bei ...


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Mit zwei kleinen Korrekturen wird der Satz zumindest richtig: Den Umstand, dass die Medienkultur und Medienwirtschaft als Bindeglied zwischen den Fachbereichen Kulturwissenschaft, Geschichtswissenschaft, Rechtswissenschaft, Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Informatik und deren theoretischen Ansätzen und empirischen Methoden fungieren, finde ich höchst ...


3

These kind of second meanings words acquire often due to slang as your Italian example of finished meaning crazy seldomly translate literally from language to language. See for example German blau meaning drunk which gave rise to a number of idiomatic expressions (e.g. blau wie ein Veilchen, blue as a violet) but which does not literally translate into any ...


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I have never heard that phrase used that way and meant to be offensive. It would typically be used as a question when inquiring if somebody is finished, for example, when wondering if you can take their plate. I have, however, seen the word "fertig" used in an offensive manner: Der Typ ist voll fertig. This would mean something like That guy is ...


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Both versions are correct and good German, and you can use both to translate “There is no way back”. But there are subtile differences: Es gibt keinen Weg zurück. is a more verbatim translation. It respects the grammar and word order of the English original. Here you have almost a word-to-word translation. The literal word-to-word translation back to ...


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In all of those expressions the aber/doch does little more than denote an opposition between the first and the second part. Any type of significance of one part is introduced by other words in the sentences/fragments. Er ist zwar nicht reich, dafür aber gesund. It is the dafür that emphasises the positivity of being healthy whose benefits outweigh the ...


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In der Patentschrift ist von zwei Trennkörpern die Rede, die beide den Stromfluss unterbinden. Einer wird für das Ausschalten verwendet, der zweite tritt bei Überlastung des Stromkreises in Aktion, indem er das Einschalten verhindert. Als Übersetzung scheint mir separating object angemessen oder separating part.


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Yes Mostly Yes. In case of a housedoor the term »vor« is very clear. If you have a door that separates inside from outside, then »vor der Tür(e)« is always outside. If you think of a windows, it is not so clear. In this case it depends on the context. No. »Hinter« is always at the opposite side of the person. So in your example (window) »vor« and »hinter« ...


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Vor is a tricky little preposition in this context. It can come in two forms. As part of a set phrase. vor der Tür / vor dem Fenster Always refering to the outside of an enclosed space, typically a room or house, but also a vehicle. As part of the contrasting pair vor etwas / hinter etwas With vor describing something between the observer and a second ...


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From the meaning of the sentence, I am leaning towards your turn of event description although I find it hard to see a difference between the two. There is certainly a direct-contrast type of element in the entire thing but I feel the main importance is on the sequential aspect where the later situation is substantially different from before because of how ...


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According to the Redensarten Index (index of [German] proverbs and sayings), it means jemand kommt in eine feierliche / glückliche Stimmung; jemand bekommt das gute Gefühl, einem besonderen Ereignis beizuwohnen Meaning someone gets into a good or celebratory mood; someone gets the feeling they are witnessing or partaking in a special event It ...



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