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22

Einfallen in this context is closely related to erinnern. While sich an etwas erinnern is a conscious process where the subject is the person remembering and thus the verb is best translated by to remember something, in the case of einfallen it is more an appearing idea — and the idea is also the subject. Mir fällt die Telefonnummer nicht ein. is ...


14

Ein "Fangirl" oder "Fanboy" meint einen unkritischen Fan von etwas oder jemandem (einem Künstler, einem Unternehmen etc.). Meist ist es abwertend gemeint, im Sinne von "War doch klar, dass die Fanboys sich diese Aktion auch noch schönreden" oder "wer XY jetzt noch verteidigt, ist doch nur ein blauäugiges Fangirlie". Ob "-girl" oder "-boy" richtet sich nach ...


10

I'm assuming you ask for "fachlich" with regards to IT design and requirements. Traditional IT requirement analysis differentiates between functional and non-functional requirements. This is expressed in German by fachliche Anforderungen (this refers to requirements stated by the business [i.e. "Fach"] problem that your software wants to solve) and ...


10

Ungebildet does not mean the same as uneducated. In german, the terms has a (slight) negative connotation. It means that the person has a below-then-average general knowledge. It can also refer to manners. If you have bad manners, sometimes the word ungebildet is used to describe that ("Was für ein ungebildeter Pöbel!"). For example, if you fail to hold ...


8

Ich würde es nicht »gwe« schreiben, sondern »gö« oder eher »göh« (mit stummen h). Eigentlich ist es »göl« mit einem stummen l, das man oft in österreichischen Dialekten findet. Es ist die Dialekt-Version des Wortes »gell«. Die Folgen »ell« und »el« werden in Österreich (und wie ich vermute auch in Bayern) gerne als langgezogenes »ö« ausgesprochen (eigentlich ...


7

Gendarm »Gendarm« is a profession. The word is french and was used for a rural policeman. (Policemen in cities was called »Polizist«). Now all policemen are called »Polizist«. Jude This is the family name (or last name) of the policeman who shot Adolf Herrmann. Judes full name was »Hermann Jude«. The policeman Hermann Jude shot the politician Adolf ...


6

Einfallen has a lot of meanings in German (see dict.cc). This is why the translator is a bit confused. In your case it would be to cross sb.'s mind to come into sb.'s mind / head to occur to sb. I would translate your sentence as follows: The telephone number doesn’t come into my mind.


5

Duden.de helps: Gen­darm, der. Gebrauch: österreichisch [bis 2005], sonst veraltet. (besonders auf dem Land eingesetzter) Polizist; Angehöriger einer Gendarmerie So it's a certain kind of policeman. To parse that part in its entirety: erschossen durch: shot by (must be followed by Akkusativ) den Gendarmen: "Gendarm" in Akkusativ case Jude: the ...


4

In addition to detailed answers here, sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Vor Ich bin vor 3 Jahren nach Zürich gezogen. I moved to Zurich 3 years ago. –> This was a single event that happened at a specific point in the past. I’m just relating it to the present by saying “3 years ago” and not “in 2009”. seit Ich wohne seit 3 Jahren in ...


4

Wenn ich mir nur den Wikipedia-Artikel zu Gyrometer so anschaue, gibt es da viele Begriffe für verschiedenartige Dinge, die aber grundsätzlich das gleiche tun, nämlich eine Drehbewegung zu erkennen bzw. zu messen. Diese werden entsprechend alle Gyrosensor oder Gyrometer genannt. Dabei gibt es verschiedene Bauarten: Gyroskop Mechanischer Kreisel, bei dem ...


4

Homonyms In all languages (I guess even in constructed languages like Esperanto) there are homonyms. A homonym is a word that has different meanings. The english wikipedia article about homonyms, shows the word »bow« as an example for a homonym. This are the meanings of »bow«, taken from this article: bow – a long wooden stick with horse hair that is ...


4

The caller asks you, if you have a piece of paper and a pencil which you can use to take some notes. So sentence b) is right.


3

Die Herkunft dieses Satzzusatzes kenne ich nicht, aber ja es ist eine lokale in Österreich vorkommende Interpetation von 'gell'. Im norddeutschen zum Beispiel wird häufig der Laut 'Ne' am Ende eines Satzes platziert, ebenfalls mit dem Zweck der Zustimmung, bzw. Bestätigung der Aufmerksamkeit des Zuhörers


3

Literally, ungebildet means uneducated. However it carries a negative connotation that's similar to that of the English commoner. It is sometimes used like uneducated, but usually one avoids it by using different words like höheres/tieferes Bildungsniveau, which also isn't perfectly neutral, but still better than ungebildet. The negative connotation is ...


3

It's correct that "Sehr gerne." can be translated to each of those English expressions. While those expressions indeed have something in common they also have subtle but distinct meanings. So at the end of the day it clearly depends on the context. In your example, the German expression "Sehr gerne." is simply a variation of "Ja, bitte." and, as such, is ...


3

It can be translated to "remember" or "recall". I just cannot remember the phone number. So in this case it means the same as erinnern an. Edit: Just for fun: In a completely different and somewhat special context, "einfallen" can also have the meaning of "invade". Edit2: Changed "telephone" to "phone" in the example sentence to make the sentence ...


2

Mir fällt die Telefonnummer einfach nicht ein. means I just can't remember the/this telephone number.


2

sehr gern "Sehr gern" is used in two cases. It might be clearer if you regard "Sehr gern" as abbreviation for: First as reply to a question like in your example. "[...] Soll ich dir eine neue bestellen?" (That would be kind / yes please) "Das wäre nett/freundlich." / "Ja, bitte." or "Das hätte ich sehr gern so." <- And this is ...


2

"Ungebildet" means "uneducated", but is not restricted to formal education (indeed, "gebildet" can even be used in opposition to formal education, if you think that formal education goes wrong). When referring to formal education, you'd often say "ausgebildet" instead. The term "gebildet" refers to everything you learned during your life, starting with what ...


1

Deine Annahme ist korrekt. Unmittelbar bedeutet in deinem Beispiel, wie du selbst vermutet hast, dass keine andere Zahl dazwischen liegt, sondern dass zwei direkt auf eins folgt. Duden führt insgesamt drei verschiedene Bedeutungen auf. In allen dort aufgelisteten Beispielen lässt sich die Bedeutung jedoch so umschreiben: Es liegt nichts (Bedeutendes, ...


1

You are correct about both the translation and the meaning of etwas in this sentence. You could replace etwas with ein bisschen and the meaning would stay the same. Ich bin nur ein bisschen nervös. You can do the same in many other cases, such as Sie nahm etwas Salz. = Sie nahm ein bisschen Salz. Ich brauche etwas Geld. = Ich brauche ein ...


1

You already gave the correct translations, but I try to summarize it in one sentence: I can be untidy and almost sloppy when working a lot, but having time I can be precise and nitpicking. I don't know, if that is what you had in mind. I would differentiate the words in english like that: unordentlich: untidy by the means of unsorted, not ...


1

So when Germans use ungebildet, what do they actually mean? It depends on the context but in most cases illiterate is a better translation for ungebildet. It is contemptuous and goes in the direction of calling someone being rude and being not cultivated. The latter implies some lack of education. Does it refer to someone’s social abilities or is it ...


1

A person is being described as ungebildet, when they have lower than average classical or general education. The Term "meme" describes bits of knowledge that are being bassed on from generation to generation, and that are considered as being generally known and generally understood. So you might picture somebody who is "ungebildet" as someone who knows ...


1

I wouldn't rule out that it was meant at least somewhat derogatory, but in this case it's just the shooter's job: Hermann Jude was a "Gendarm", meaning a gendarme or country constable. For further information, additional to the WP article you already mentioned, see the WP articles for Gendarmerie, German and English. EDIT: And as far as the assumed ...


1

Tense does matter here. When referring to a specific point in time in the past vor: use it like you would use ago in English. (20 yrs ago … / Vor 20 Jahren …) if something began in the past and is still going on (specific point in time) seit: use it like you would use since in English. (since 1958 … / seit 1958 …) if something began in the past and is ...


1

The word “ändern” refers to "changing" something by adding something different or leading someone in a new direction. In essence, you are changing the "mix," rather than the underlying object. This is sometimes referred to as "retail" change. On the other hand “verändern” has the connotation of changing something by replacing what's already there. In the ...


1

Indeed there is an expression of affection and surprise in it. It is used quite often as in "Pass doch auf, Mensch!", "Mensch, du hast Recht!" or "Ach, Mensch!". I would rate it as commonly used but colloquial. There is also "Mensch, Meier!" which is used to express astonishment (Meier is a very common name in Germany) Duden describes the usage of "Mensch"...



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