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7

An idiomatic translation of unfreiwillig komisch would be unintentionally hilarious but I guess the literal translation involuntarily funny can be understood, too: According to Spiegel Online, the Tatort crime movie is funny because it has a bad, laughable script (or is poorly acted) - although, by the producers, it is not meant to be funny.


7

This is a picture of one: It is a Gitter (grate, grille...) in front of a car. It can be used to clear/evacuate (räumen) an area. The picture can be found here: http://www.panzerbaer.de/helper/bgs_sonderwagen-a.htm There is another Spiegel article from 1989: Die so harmlos als "Zaunsegmente" deklarierten Werkstücke entpuppten sich als Räumgitter für ...


6

I guess the fun part is rather located in the "explodieren" – but also in combination with the "bei unbefugtem Verlassen des Hauses." So I would interpret the complete warning that the bathrobes will actually explode when they try to leave the house. Which is of course utter nonsense. But for me it is just a sign of the hotel owner's sheer desperation. ...


6

The meaning of "große Klappe" is, that she has a "big mouth" or that she is "lippy".


5

It's the third train that is meant here. The subclause [...] der erste Zug geht um 21.00 Uhr. can be translated with the first train leaves at 9 pm. and implies that there are several trains leaving. The first sentence in the next paragraph refers to those trains. Diplomat Elbe is in the third one. I have to admit that I had to read the quote ...


5

Maybe you are misled by a translation error - Zweiklassengesellschaft isn't a "second-class society", it is a "two class / dual class / two tier society" (see some discussions on leo.org). So it means there were two classes in the society of the GDR (DDR): the people with West-German currency and relatives in Western Germany who would sent monthly parcels ...


5

The usage of the "Binnen-I" in german spelling occured from the 1980ies (e.g. KollegInnen, MitarbeiterInnen). It is frequently used but similarly often it is rejected. These short forms are not consistent with present spelling rules where capitals within words are not allowed. Duden - Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007


5

Yes, you're right. I would translate it as follows: Even though the German friends of Sweden with their elk stickers on the cars hardly believe it:


5

very close – part 1 is correct, part 2 not 100%: "Wir waren uns näher" actually means "We were nearer (or 'closer') to each other" – – and this kind of asks for "als" ('than'). so I would translate it as this: "All these years we were closer (to each other), than we wanted to admit"


5

An idiomatic translation would be: Doing this also lets your companion know that they can help themself to the leftovers. Ihrer is the dative singular. The companion is not necessarily a woman, but the noun Begleitung is feminine. A more literal translation would be: To your companion you are signalling thereby - by the way - that he/she may help ...


4

Pretty much, yes. It politely asks for a small contribution to the food (at a party, we suppose, or other such occasion.)


4

When there is a group which shares a secret and they want to include another person by telling her their secret you would "jemanden (in etwas) einweihen". The closest English translation I found is to bring somebody into the loop.


4

The core phrase Wo ist sie hin? can indeed be translated as Where did she go/disappear (to)?   or depending on context as   Where's she headed? while the attempt of a literal traslation shows that the phrase doesn't contain any verb denoting movement: Where's he to? The movement is conveyed by the combination of sein and the ...


4

This is a blending of two idiomatic expressions: ein dicker Fisch “a big fish” → a serious offender ungeschoren davonkommen “get away unshorn” → get away with it; get away unscathed The latter one comes from sheep shearing, which would be strange when applied to fish.


3

The other answer didn't get the problem with the sentence. The sentence is intended to communicate that message that the bathrobes explode when you leave the house with them and you don't have permission to leave with them. The problem is that it doesn't. It doesn't say that the bathrobes explode when you wear them while leaving the house. It says that ...


3

"Wer wird eingeweiht" means "who do you tell about your travel plans"? "Einweihen" can either refer to some kind of opening or to some secret. In the latter case, there are a couple of opportunities according to PONS: if the secret is some kind of cult or rite: to initiate if it is a secret of your own, some private thing: to tell somebody about, to let ...


3

It is not "Dass ... beachtet", but "Dass ... glauben". But the sentence is really hard to read even for native german speakers. Here is a try to reorder the sentence: Dass diejenigen in der CDU-Führung, die sagen, die "Alternative für Deutschland" (AfD) sei zu ignorieren, die AfD auch tatsächlich nicht beachten, glauben mutmaßlich selbst diejenigen in der ...


3

It's a complicated sentence. Freely translated, it means: Not even those members of the CDU who criticize their party leadership for ignoring the AfD are likely to believe that CDU leaders who say that the AfD must be ignored actually do not pay attention to it.


3

Just would like to add: depending on the context, it could also mean a financial contribution. For example if there is a wedding at a fancy restaurant, I doubt you're expected you to bring a bowl of potato salad. So if in doubt: ask, what you could contribute. That's how I usually do it. This also avoids the situation of having five potato salads or the ...


3

Scheint ein aktueller Songtext zu sein. Eigentlich ist mir "angezeckt" nicht bekannt, aber vom Kontext her würde ich es als "von zu viel Alkohol angeschlagen oder ganz schön blau" verstehen. Man hat einen "Brand", das heißt ein Bedürfnis nach neuer Alkoholzufuhr, weil der Alkoholspiegel nach kurzem Schlaf gesunken ist, und diesen Brand bekämpft man am ...


3

You got it right - this form is called "Binnen-I", and it is used as a "neutral" form to cover both genders. It can be used generally in contexts where you are not bound to the "official" orthography rules, since it is not part of them.


3

Die einen is the plural form of one - literally the ones. However, here it's translatable as some (as in some of the people). As far as I know, die einen is always used in conjunction with die anderen to contrast one group of people (or things) with another. Here it's contrasting one group of DDR-Bürger (those who escaped) with another (those who took part ...


2

Yes, this is the P.C. way, instead of using just "Besucher" (visitors), which traditionally encompassed both genders. Many people don't like it, but it's becoming more and more frequent. Personally I prefer "Besucher and Besucherinnen", instead of using the so-called Binnen-I.


2

It means that the DDR is - was - a two-tier society in that way that some people had western relatives and therefore, some access to western money and packages from the BRD. Western money then could be used to buy western goods, the DDR had special shops to do so, so called "Intershops". Those who had no relatives in the BRD, on the other hand, did not ...


2

I think Grantwalzer's answer is the most valuable so far. I just want to point out that we cant say for sure what Gauck ment by this as this is not a common expression or a derivate of a common expression. So you really can only speculate: As Grantwalzer said "What in the world happened to [dealing with] the future?" is already very good i think. ...


2

I wouldn't think this sentence funny. I would consider it as bad style to mix imagines that don't fit together. Sheep are shorn for their wool and we have the saying "ungeschoren davonkommen" meaning to get away without punishment. But together with fish "ungeschoren" is a silly image as fish have no wool that can be shorn off. By the way, to shear has the ...


2

It's an idiomatic expression, meaning just what happened to the future?


1

To start with a little disclaimer: I'm not a historian; so please take my statement regarding German history with a grain of salt. At first, each critic who left the GDR weakened its political opponents (because one critic less is one opponent less) [Die Abwanderung schwächte das politische Widerspruchspotenzial...]. When the leave (via Hungary) became ...


1

If it were "Wo geht die Zukunft hin", I would understand that it means "Where does the future go". In fact, both expressions are equivalent. I will give you an example. If you wanna ask someone, where he would like to go, you could say : "Wo wollen Sie hingehen"? or "Wo wollen Sie hin"? In an exact manner, "Wo bist du hin" is the same as "Wo bist ...


1

Extremely close to the original (but no idiomatic English): That, whoever says in the CDU leadership that the AfD is to be ignored, actually ignores them, too, is probably not even believed by those in the CDU who criticize their party leadership for that. If you turn this structure around somewhat, you arrive at Ingmar's translation.



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