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0

The word "jedoch" is not deciphered by the parts "je" and "doch". In my opinion is also not originating or tied with from "jeglich", "immer" or so on. "Jedoch" means the contradiction of a earlier sentence/part/intention or statement in a conversation/discussion: "Ich würde gerne etwas essen, jedoch habe ich keinen Hunger" "Ich würde gerne mit zum Schwimmen ...


0

Here is what my German teenager says. Liebeskummer is commonly used in Germany today, even among teenagers. Often Liebeskummer is used when a couple breaks up and then you are heartbroken and cry a lot. Liebeskummer is not an actual sickness -- it is just a saying. Liebeskrank on the other hand she never heard about and says that this must not be ...


0

Note that jedoch and doch are also similar in meaning, namely introducing a concession. So while Robert and the others aren't wrong (you can't always guess the meaning of a German word by dissecting it into its components), there still is a logic link.


4

For administrative purposes, Germany is divided into districts called Kreis or Landkreis. Until 1974, the town Marburg an der Lahn had a district of its own, but the surrounding district was also called Marburg, or more precisely "Landkreis Marburg". Marburg-Stadt and Marburg-Land can be seen as short-hand terms to distinguish these two administrative ...


0

You can compare it with »Salzburg Stadt« and »Salzburg Land« in Austria. Both are unofficial names, because both geographic and political entities have the same official name: »Salzburg«. The Salzburg that often is called »Salzburg Land« is one of the nine states of Austria. Austria is a federal country that consists of states, like USA, Mexico and Germany. ...


1

I guess the question stems from the Wiktionary entry for jedoch. My etymogological states that je meant always, forever (Old High German io, eo). In compounds such as jedoch, jeder, jeglich, immer, the original meaning has been lost and is not recognizable any more.


0

Marburg-Land and Marburg-Stadt are historical districts in the formerly Styrian part of Slovenia (today Maribor). M.-Stadt (city) was the city as a separate district itself, while M.-Land was the district covering the surroundings.


-2

The word "Pflaster" originated form the word "emplastron" which was a band-aid with salve on it. Because of the covering and protecting characteristics of a band-aid the word was then used for the pavement covering the streets. Since the 19th century the word is "Pars pro toto", meaning "a part (taken) for the whole".


8

The expression ein teures/gefährliches/heisses/... Pflaster comes from former times, when only city roads had cobblestone (Pflastersteine) pavements and thus refers to city roads, therefore - the city, or a place in a city. It should be mentioned this only works in a number of idioms as above: Ein historisches Pflaster to describe a historic city ...


0

I think the answer is wrong, because a bicycle is a very handy means of transport in a city as flat as Berlin, but in a more hilly city, like for example in Stuttgart or Zürich, to name only two, Ben would say something different altogether. So the part "in der Stadt", which means "in a city-esque environment", as opposed to "in the city of Berlin" in this ...


4

The first sentence translates roughly to: "We were in frail health" The second sentence translates roughly to: "We were not allowed to be called sick" This is a old style of expression from the german language, which is not used in today's speech. In this case this means that a group of people was in frail health but one was not allowed to call them sick. ...


1

I would like to see the whole context, as it sounds a bit strange. As it stands it'd be something along: We were sickly, however sick we weren't allowed to be called. Using the same slightly awkward syntax in English.


4

For the words you suggested: Liebeskrank refers to being so much in love that you can't make rational decisions or as DUDEN describes it: sich aus Verliebtheit in einem Zustand der Übererregtheit befindend Liebeskummer refers to a depressed feeling because of (rejected) love, again DUDEN: durch eine unglückliche Liebesbeziehung verursachte ...


-2

In this context, "und" is short for "und so weiter" (etc.) "Und" ist eine Abkurzung fur "und so weiter" (etc.)


6

Das ist lediglich schlechte Zeichensetzung in der Übersetzung. "Oh!" she gasped, as her husband came in the room. "Darling, I just had the most terrible dream! It was like an explosion and—" "Again?" Burckhardt asked, not very sympathetically. "Mary, something's funny! I knew there was something wrong all day yesterday and—" ...


0

Without giving away too much of the plot of the story (I hope), this stylistic means has probably been chosen for two reasons: You don't need to bee too detailed. Leave off what doesn't serve the main purpose (!) Create some sort of hectic atmosphere where the characters are driven forward through the story and also create some lurking feel of "not right". ...


5

I don't know if Frederik Pohls sentences are meant to be incomplete direct speech, but if so, you write it either with a final ellipsis (Auslassungspunkte): »Ich ging in den Keller und ...« Or with a final dash (Gedankenstrich): »Ich ging in den Keller und –«


0

I would like to explain the word as Heiddegers antisemitism, the word meaning more “manipulation and trixing and fixing”, in other words the negative sterotypical view of urban jews. This puts Heiddeger near the nazi critcism of international liberal capitalism, and Adorno said that the antisemitism was actually due to a sort of “too close for comfort ...


3

Der Satz ist (bis auf einen kleinen Fehler: »Ansätzen« statt »Ansätze«) grammatisch korrekt, aber durch die vielen Aufzählungen und Einschübe etwas kompliziert und daher für viele Leser schwer verständlich. Außerdem enthält er eine Konstruktion, die sich unterschiedlich interpretieren lässt, was vor allem in Bezug auf die Wahl von Singular oder Plural bei ...


4

Mit zwei kleinen Korrekturen wird der Satz zumindest richtig: Den Umstand, dass die Medienkultur und Medienwirtschaft als Bindeglied zwischen den Fachbereichen Kulturwissenschaft, Geschichtswissenschaft, Rechtswissenschaft, Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Informatik und deren theoretischen Ansätzen und empirischen Methoden fungieren, finde ich höchst ...


2

TL;DR Everything you wanted to know about voller vs voll and will probably regret asking by the time you've read this whole thing. (I know I did) The short answer to your question, as opposed to what follows below: The distinction between voll and voller is the result of habit and changes in language use, and its origins keep academics busy writing paper. ...


1

I like your explanation but it is reversed then: Die Straßen lagen voller Schnee. — The roads have been full of snow. (more 3D wise, there are hills of snow) Die Straßen lagen voll Schnee. — The roads are covered all over with snow. (everywhere is snow)


3

Wir nehmen dieses Thema gerade in der Schule durch. Also jeweils die Hauptmerkmale: Sage: Historische Bezüge (wahrer Kern) Teilweise Aufhebung von Natur und Kausalgesetzen. Deutliche Trennung von dies- und jenseitiger Welt. Reale Schauplätze Mündlich überliefert Genaue Orts- und Zeitangaben (hoher Realitätsanspruch) Stoffe und Motive für die Sage werden ...


0

Actually g’suffa means drank, like in “He drank it.” In this context g’suffa is a invitation to drink your beer now.


2

In Bens Aussage wird die gestellte Frage nicht beantwortet. Deshalb ist "falsch" die richtige Antwort auf die Frage. "Das geht prima" bedeutet hier, dass es keine Probleme gibt, wenn man in Berlin mit dem Fahrrad unterwegs ist.


2

I guess the answer is wrong for the following reasons: Ben talks specifically about Berlin, not any given city Ben doesn't say anything about using a bike is useful. He just says that it is easy to get around in Berlin using a bike, but not whether he sees any advantage in doing so.


3

I also strongly vote for correspondence to (i). The second question as many people, as would fill a hall is in my opinion very difficult, no matter, in which language, since a hall is no standard size, and a hall in a school is several orders of magnitude smaller than a hall in a convention center. I would always resort to numbers instead, like mehrere ...


3

Ein Saal voll Menschen is a hall which is full of people. If you want to denote the number of people that fit into a hall that would be ein Saalvoll Menschen That is not exactly standard but will probably be understood. Otherwise, you always have the possibility of adding a subordinate clause: So viele Menschen, dass ein Saal davon voll werden ...


2

I hope I got your question right, your point is not exactly clear. Assuming that: Your cases are indistinguishable without further context. "Ein Glas voll Milch" can either target at the glass (as a measure for milk) or the milk (as the content measured). In English, you would distinguish the cases by talking either of a Roomful of people or a ...


6

Ben sagt nichts darüber, ob ein Fahrrad in Berlin nützlich ist oder nicht. Er sagt (ähnlich, aber nicht dasselbe): "Es geht" - Hier in einer Bedeutung wie "es funktioniert/ist möglich", "lässt sich machen", "ist akzeptabel". Deine Vermutung über die Hauptstadt kann ich nicht bestätigen - Obwohl Berlin die Hauptstadt ist, sagen wir immer noch (auch) ...


-2

The word »voller« can be the comparative of the adjective »voll«: voll - voller - am vollsten full - fuller - fullest But this is not how it is used here. Here it is just a variation of the preposition »voll«. Just a synonym with no other meaning. If you want to know it more in detail, here is a 40 pages long presentation upon the word »voller«: ...


-1

No, there is no semantic difference between the two sentences - It is rather a syntactic one. voller is (maybe? or maybe evolving to?) a preposition, voll is an adjective. The former has evolved from the latter over time - voll used to be ruling the genitive (e.g. „Himmel und Erde sind seiner Ehre voll.“ in Bach's lyrics), in contemporary language both voll ...


2

I would disagree. He thinks theres an "Anliegen", and he's glad because of that. (Er freut sich ÜBER das Anliegen (which he thinks there would be)) The other possibility would be, he KNOWS theres an "Anliegen", and he can't await to hear it. (Er freut sich AUF das Anliegen)


0

The difference between the two is mainly focus. In ‘Sie besprechen den Plan’, the focus is on the plan they are discussing. Maybe they already know rather clearly what they want and just have to hash out the details. In ‘Sie besprechen sich über den Plan’, the focus is put more on the discussing people themselves or the discussion itself and less on the ...


1

I can give you a translation by words, but I am not sure about the background of the sentence. dich ist das funf ferkel vekgeloffen. Dich is second person accusative, i.e. you. (Accusative wouldn't be used here usually, so I guess it's accent/idiom/dialect.) A Ferkel is a young pig Funf would be fünf, meaning five. In context I change it towards ...


1

The phrase literally means ownership instead of rent. It’s hard to tell without further context, but you may have seen an offer for buying a home, combined with a loan. In that case, you would pay a certain amount regularly for the next ten or fifteen or twenty years until you have paid back the loan and the home is yours.


3

I think, there is a difference between the use of sich melden zu and sich melden für (even though I couldn’t find references). I would use sich melden zu to signal that I am here and ready to work. Whereas with sich melden für I would show the willingness to do the job in general/later. Example with zu: A: “Ich melde mich zum Putzen” B: “Gut, ...


4

Zusätzlich zu ammoQs und TheCs Antworten beschreibt Lieferung auch die Ware, die geliefert wird. Sätze wie Ist die Lieferung schon da? oder Ich kriege heute eine Lieferung, deswegen kann ich jetzt nicht kommen. trifft man auch an.


-1

Eine Freundin hat mir vor langer Zeit erzählt, dass sie auf Partys, wenn sie von Nichtmedizinern, die sich einen besonders intellektuellen Anschein gaben, angesprochen wurde, immer sagte, sie studiere Humanmedizin, während sie gewöhnlich lediglich Medizin gesagt hätte. Es ist also der selbe Studiengang, wobei die erste Bezeichnung je nach Situation den ...


3

Grundlegend ist ein Synonym für die Anlieferung eine Lieferung. Im Sprachgebrauch ist mit der Lieferung häufig der gesamte Ablauf angesprochen. Praktisch der gesamte Versandweg vom Versender zum Empfänger. Bei der Anlieferung wird in dem Sinne meist vom "Zustellen" an den Empfänger gesprochen. Also der ANLieferung AN den Empfänger. Soweit also ...


3

Anlieferung beschreibt nach meinem Verständnis nur den letzten Teil der Lieferung, nämlich den, bei dem die Ware beim Empfänger ankommt. Lieferung beschreibt den gesamten Weg vom Sender zum Empfänger, gegebenenfalls mit Wechsel des Logistikdienstleisters. Oft wird aber "Lieferung" auch als Synonym für "Anlieferung" verwendet.


-2

I don't know why DUDEN lists besprechen as a reflexive verb. It is not used as such. Hence, the second sentence you gave for an example doesn't sound correct to me. You can say: "Sie haben eine Besprechung über etw." oder "Sie sprechen sich ab" but not "Sie besprechen sich über den Plan". This verb is only used as a transitive verb.


1

All three constructions mean the same thing. However, (1) is also used when you give advice to someone: Wir beraten mehrere Fortune-500-Firmen. Here the direct object is the advisee, not the topic under discussion. Usually, context will disambiguate between "Wir beraten den Kunden" and "Wir beraten das Problem", but not always, therefore to be clear ...


2

As Hubert pointed out, there is no genitive plural indefinite article (since it would be a null article) but the genitive-replacement von-dative works. Belange der Minderheiten means that you are talking about the interests of all minorities (globally all, unless you previously specified a list of what constitues ‘all’). Belange von Minderheiten takes an ...


1

Your wild guess is wrong, probably because the examples you have seen seem to imply this and are not very well chosen. "Sich streiten" and "streiten" mean more or less the same thing, at least in most cases. "Um" just adds the object argued about. There is a small difference in possible applicability. The reflexive form always refers to more than one ...


2

It's correct as well, and there is no difference in meaning. There is only a small difference in usage: "sich melden zu" can only be used with an activity, say, sich zum Dienst melden sich zum Geschirrspülen melden whereas "sich melden für" can be used with an activity, but also with a place or time (where/when the activity takes place) or an ...


8

A literal translation would be "stick-legged. It's a describing word combination, meaning the photographer's subject is standing stiff and errect instead of in a relaxed, "cool" pose. A probably more common term would be steifbeinig.



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