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The verb "überlassen" means to "leave" to, in the sense of leave something to someone. "Verlassen" means to leave (go away) from (somewhere). They both use the verb "lassen" (leave), but otherwise have very different, almost opposite meanings.


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The phrase is not "Anstrengung geben". "geben" is just the verb in "es muss etwas geben" in the meaning of "there must something happen". The thing that should happen is "eine gemeinsame Anstrengung".


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überlassen takes two objects: jemandem (=Dativ) etwas/jemanden (=Akkusativ) überlassen It means to leave something/somebody to someone. Überlassen can be used if something is left out of surrender/capitulation (Die Burg wurde den Angreifern überlassen) or if you grant someone something (Ich habe den letzten Schokoriegel meiner Schwester überlassen). ...


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Nouns and articles are conjugated according to the grammatical case we use. In your example the appropriate cases are: Die Frau (Nominative) isst den Apfel (Accusative). Still, grammatically it is possible to use different cases in order to express a different action: Die Frau (Accusative) isst der Apfel (Nominative) = the woman is being eaten by ...


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They are not the same, but related. The answer is that the articles "der, die, das" are declined. You might have a look at the explanantion here (I don't know of any easier right now). In your example the line "Die Frau isst den Apfel" is the correct one. The article of "der Apfel" would change again if we would say "Die Frau isst den Kern des Apfels" (the ...


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X-er normally means "someone doing X" (backen -> Bäcker etc.), but is here used for the action itself. Fuchtler < fuchteln "to brandish, to wave about". Close enough, "Prügler" would have been too strong. Einigler < ein-igeln "to curl up like a hedgehog". Pretty good translation, as "to curl" is difficult to translate. Walzer < walzen "to roll, to ...


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The second party is the customer involved. In English it's the same, we talk about third party components etc.


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Wenn die deutsche Wikipedia Recht hat, dann ist der Zweithersteller oder -anbieter ein vom Erstanbieter beauftragter Anbieter. Ich verstehe das in Richtung Lizenzproduktion. Der korrespondierende englische Wikipedia-Artikel zählt anders: first party ist der Anbieter (und alles unter dessen Kontrolle), second party der Käufer, und third party sind alle, die ...


2

There is room for interpretation, depending on the context: A) In »correct« German the question Seid ihr am Wochenende zu Hause? is referring to the next weekend (am is a contraction of an dem). So —assuming that the answering person hasn’t misunderstood the question— the answer should also refer to the next weekend, that is, next weekend they’ll be at ...


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The former. Meistens means that they are usually (lit. most of the weekends) at home. Note that in this particular case the question usually refers to the next (coming) weekend: you wouldn't answer meistens then, which is a general reply. To indicate that you will be home most of the next weekend, use something like Großteils. Den größten Teil.


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In addition to what the other answers state, the phrase can more generally be used to indicate success in a challenging situation, typically if you started on the wrong track. You can strengthen the statement: Sie hat gerade so noch die Kurve gekriegt. It only just worked.


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Besides the possibility of a typo, Nebenfeld means secondary area oft interest, In contrast to Hauptfeld, which is the main area oft interest or activity. Hauptfeld: Primary field Nebenfeld: Secondary field


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The correct spelling is Nebelfelder = patches of fog.


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Die Kurve kriegen is a widely used idiomatic phrase indicating that someone managed to break a negative developement/trend and get back on track. The image is someone driving along a road which takes a sharp turn at some point. So if they don't change the direction they are currently going in, they will crash/fail. The negated version is also in use: Er ...


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It means that he managed to get his act together, as it were, and beat you after all. Apparently he saw himself at a disadvantage at some point.


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The use of "häufig" should indicate that there is a high quantity of events. The use of "üblich" indicates that in a specific culture or context something is considered normal or to describe traditions. "gewöhnlich" is a synoynm for "üblich"; both also may stress something neutral "Ein gewöhnlicher Tag - a day like any other", üblich would work too, but I ...


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"häufig" relates to a specific and frequent happening. "üblich" refers to a habit, usage, etc. The frequency is not important here. You can say: a) Sie haben es häufig vergessen. (meaning: often) b) Das ist ein häufiger/üblicher/gewöhnlicher Fehler. (meaning: frequent / common / common) c) Sie sind wie üblich/gewöhnlich gekommen or Sie ist ...


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First off, there are more words: typisch(typical) and normal, to name a few. They all are very equal to the English counterparts. Let's take a look at the "forget"-example: Ich vergesse häufig. Ich vergesse gewöhnlicherweise/für gewöhnlich. Ich vergesse normalerweise. Ich vergesse typischerweise. Ich vergesse üblicherweise. They're all possible but ...



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