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65

One obvious way (still worth pointing out) is always learning vocabulary with the "der, die, das" prefix. If you memorize Der Hund Die Rose Das Haus instead of Hund Rose Haus you learn the gender automatically along the way — not unlike Latin (Rosa, Rosae, Rosam).


32

Generally I think we have to just learn them, but here are some patterns I've been told: Word ends with "a" -> feminine (die Sauna) Word ends with "e" -> feminine (die Tasche, die Küche) Word ends with "ung" -> feminine (die Entscheidung) Word ends with "chen" -> neutral (das Mädchen, das Märchen) Word comes from a foreign language -> neutral (das Hotel, ...


24

Der Klassiker, den man in der Schule lernt, ist das Wort durch „dieses“ o.ä. zu ersetzen. Wenn der der Satz immer noch (fast) das gleiche bedeutet, dann war's nur ein s: Ich glaube, dieses du noch viel lernen must. Völlig sinnfrei, also Doppel-s. Ich glaube, dieses haben wir gestern in der Schule gelernt. Holperig, aber richtig ...


16

"Das" wird (wie "die" und "der" auch) benutzt, wenn man sich auf ein Subjekt bezieht, welches im Satz bereits erwähnt wurde, meistens also Sachen oder Dinge. Wir stiegen in das Flugzeug ein, das uns nach Mallorca bringt (Weil: Das Flugzeug) Er leiht mir seinen Rasenmäher, der schon sehr alt ist (Weil: Der Rasenmäher) Wir haben eine Katze, die nur Blödsinn ...


16

As the others have said, at the end of the day, you really just have to memorize them. I found a little list of generalizations regarding regular, genitive, and plural noun endings and their associated genders, but I stress that they are no more than generalizations. That does not mean that there are no exceptions! I'll go ahead and copy them below, but ...


16

It really is learning-by-heart, for the most part. There is no clean method to guess your way though, and no reliable pattern to learn. There is one simple rule though to determine the gender of a composite noun - it always has the gender of the last noun in the composition der Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän ...


14

As a tip or trick, it may be worth considering the technique proposed by Dominic O'Brien in his book How To Develop A Perfect Memory. The basic idea is that you take advantage of the natural human ability to memorize locations and spatial relationships. Specifically, you choose a town that you know very well and divide it into three 'districts,' each of ...


13

„Wir haben heute in der Schule gelernt, dass das ‚Das‘ mit einem S geschrieben wird, wenn man es durch ‚dieses‘, ‚jenes‘ oder ‚welches‘ ersetzen kann.“ Essenz des Merksatzes ist, dass man es mit einem S schreibt, eben genau wenn man es durch eines der Wörter ersetzen kann. Denn dann bezieht sich das “das” auf das Subjekt, nicht aber auf die Satzstruktur. ...


11

As a long-time active learner of German language I can tell you that all these rules about how the gender of a certain word can be inferred using its ending or its category: they can help you to come up with a good guess if you don't have a dictionary at hand, but they won't help you much during a conversation or while writing an email. At least I couldn't ...


9

When I was learning French in school, there was basically the same problem. What my teacher wanted us to do was learn vocabulary with the article (like Pekka suggested) and also color the words in gender-specific colors. As you can imagine we used blue for male and red for female words, but since there were no neutral words in French (as far as I remember), ...


8

I've learned the genders by heart, but they're somehow grouped in my memory so that I remember that a certain class of words belong to a certain gender. So far nobody has pointed out that there are homophonic words having different gender. Luckily there are some rules to differentiate them, such as "-er is masculine when it denotes somebody/something that ...


7

Wenn man es mit 'welches' oder 'jenes' ersetzen kann, wird es mit nur einem 's' geschrieben. In Reimform: Das s im „das", es bleibt allein, passt dieses, jenes, welches rein.


7

These are prepositions requiring the dative. There is a mnemonic rhyme (dt.: Eselsbrücke) you can learn to keep them in mind: "Mit, nach, von, seit, aus, zu, bei verlangen stets Fall Nummer drei." More such stuff is for instance here. Examples: Er fuhr mit dem Bus. Nach dem Bus kam ein zweiter...


6

On this Goethe Institut page, there's a cute Flash game (Spiel 03: Memo-Spiel) that does what you're looking for. Found it by searching on ""memo-spiel" bild wort lernen wortschatz", if you keep looking you may find more. Tried the search with "Memory-Spiel" instead of "Memo-Spiel" but got only links to articles not games. Possibly "Memory-Spiel" is ...


5

I really advise the use of Mnemosyne or Anki. "Spaced Repetition" is really effective. The softwares mostly test the words (cards) you know the less, until you know them well, and then they test more rarely the words you do really know. All is based on a self estimation for each tested word (card). The longer part is to fill the flash cards with your own ...


5

There are some patterns: Some endings often demand a certain gender, e.g. -nis, -ung, -age Another rule of thumb is that abstract words are often female. But the "rules" cover only a very small percentage of words.


5

As you can see there are patterns, certainly; however, with the time it takes to memorize each "pattern" and their exceptions, you could have simply memorized the article with the word. One thing that I did was write all Der nouns on a white index card, all Das nouns on a red card, and all Die nouns on a blue card. And it really did get me to associate the ...


4

Kann man das Wort durch "dieses", "jenes" oder "welches" ersetzen, wird "das" mit einem s verwendet. In jedem anderen Fall ist es "dass".


3

This is rather late in the day, but I recently stumbled upon a post on "Belles Lettres" on this very topic and was much impressed. (Note: The video is 84 minutes (!) long and includes pretty in-depth background information on linguistics, language history etc. - a lot of the things he says won't make sense if you haven't at least a ...


3

es denn lernen? Ein Kind mit Muttersprache Deutsch oder ein Ausländer, der die Tage in seiner Sprache schon kennt? Ich frage, weil im Englischen Friday, Saturday, Sunday und Monday schon sehr ähnlich sind. Da muss man nur DiMiDo lernen. Das geht aber leichter in der 4er-Gruppe: MoDiMiDo. Die Anfangsbuchstaben bilden ein Muster (MDMD) und die ersten Vokale ...


3

Wie wäre es mit dem Sams der Augsburger Puppenkiste, ein Lied bleibt ja immer recht gut hängen. Montag kommt der Herr Mohn Dienstag hab ich Dienst Mittwoch ist Mitte der Woche Donnerstag gibt es Donner Freitag hab ich frei Samstag kommt das Sams Sonntag scheint die Sonne


3

Apart from repetitive software (I agree about Anki and Mnemosyna mentioned by @Stephane-Rolland ) I recommend to support it with Mnemonics (cheack out "see also" with other mnemonic systems). I have good logical memory, so I like to take advantage of my logic memory, by remembering word relationships. For such purposes, I really recommend you Mindmapping ...


3

No flashcard, but perhaps a Bildwörterbuch (Visual dictionary) is a help: Pons has a Bildwörterbuch Hueber has one with 1000 words. I tried also a search for Quartett There are some nice cards for kids, but I think you are looking for other cards. There are some [Kartenspiele für den Deutschunterricht][7], there is for example a page Quartett Berufe ...


3

In vielen österreichischen Dialekten spricht man die beiden Worte verschieden aus (das wurde in der Schule nicht genutzt, weil der Dialekt ja ganz pfui ist), deshalb ist es für Muttersprachler eine gute Idee zu überprüfen, ob ihr Dialekt das Problem löst. Stell dir vor, dass du die entsprechende Phrase nicht ganz verstanden hast. Wie würdest du nachfragen? ...


3

You should learn the words like they all told you, but there's one rule for the nominative case which will always be correct: Singular: der Hase, die Tochter, das Fenster Plural: die Hasen, die Töchter, die Fenster So, every noun in this kind of plural have "die" as article. It's pretty easy and there are no exceptions. Learning the articles of the ...


1

I don't have much to add to the previous answers, but since I'm trying to relearn French the question is relevant to myself, too. Learning any language necessarily involves memorizing, be it one or more alphabets, vocabulary, grammar, colloquialisms, you name it. In my experience, flash card apps using spaced repetition (like the free Anki) work quite well. ...


1

Simple, non-derived words have to be learned together with their inherent gender. They often have just one syllable or a complex one followed by a weak schwa syllable (or syllabic sonorant) and occur quite frequently. Derivation rules The rightmost part of a compound always determines its gender and its noun class (for inflection). This rightmost part may ...


1

Inhaltlich nichts neues, aber da explizit nach Eselsbrücken gefragt war, hier noch zwei gereimte Merksätze: Das 's' im "das", es bleibt allein, passt "dieses", "jenes", "welches" rein. z.B. hier (mit einer Reihe von Übungen dazu) Das „s“ in „das“ muss einsam bleiben, kannst du auch „dieses“ oder „welches“ schreiben! z.B. hier (mit weiteren ...


1

Ich bin kein Muttersprachler, deswegen bräuchte ich Regeln, um "das/dass" zu unterscheiden. Ich nutze 4 Kategorien von "das/dass" dafür. Not all instances of "das" can be replaced by "die" and "der", so replacement rules do not always work. First, there are "das", "der", and "die" in a mention of someone or something by their class as in "das Kind" and ...



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