New answers tagged

1

Most likely, the difference is just a matter of regional preference. I (born in Munich) would only say "ja", but recognize "doch" to mean exactly the same. In written language I may tend to "doch" because I perceive it as more standard, but as such it may also appear to be weaker. Both imply that the question was deemed inappropriate because of the obvious ...


2

Yes, the implication changes subtly. "Ich bin doch nicht taub" implies that perhaps the asker does believe that Holmes is deaf and half-expected the answer "no". Holmes denies this somewhat testily. "Ich bin ja nicht taub" implies that the asker doesn't really believe that Holmes is deaf, and was making sure that Holmes wasn't distracted. Holmes merely ...


4

As far as I can tell, there is no difference in the meaning of both phrases. While "ja" means more a form of approval, "doch" is commonly being used to express some form contradiction. So in terms of connotation I would say there is a slight difference between the words. "Ja" does seem to explain an obvious fact, for example Holmes not being deaf, and it ...



Top 50 recent answers are included