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It may mean nothing in particular at all but it may also imply that there are second thoughts, often with a bit of a tongue-in-cheek meaning as well: Zunächst will ich einmal mein Deutsch verbessern. Oh wait a moment, did I accidentially say "einmal" instead of "mal"? That's right because this is what the somewhat sloppy, colloquial "mal" stands for. ...


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I'm not super happy with the above answers. I agree that those small interjected words usually don't have a meaning in themselves and you could leave them out, but the tone of the sentence changes (see @chirlu comment to the @HubertSchölnast answer), especially in your example: Zuerst will ich [] mein Deutsch verbessern. Gives off the impression that the ...


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"Guck" and "frag" are imperative forms of their respective verbs. That is to say that they are commands. The term "mal" is a "softener" in this context. When placed behind commands like "guck" and "frag" as "guck mal," and "frag mal," it turns those commands into suggestions. The effect of "mal" is more or less the opposite of "doch" (the latter is used ...


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The addition of the word 'mal' does not directly change the meaning in this context. It does, however, change the underlying tone of the statement. A sentence like Frag mal dort nach. makes your statement more of a proposition while Frag dort nach. sounds more like a direct instruction. This is the reason why the configuration Verb+'mal' is ...



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