New answers tagged

2

German speakers have a strong tendency to negate the direct objects of transitive verbs instead of the verbs themselves. We can still see the difference when we pay attention to what we are negating and it actually matters. But whenever the difference doesn't matter or negating the object technically doesn't make sense, then we usually negate the object ...


2

You have these possibilities (I'm not sure if the list is complete): Negating the object: Er spricht kein Englisch. This means: English is not a member of the set of languages that he is able to speak. Negating the verb: Er spricht nicht Englisch. This means: English is a language that he does not speak. (In my mind this is exactly the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included