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According to the Grimms the verb abkommen was formerly also used in the meaning of "to agree with somebody on something": Endlich ist mit einem abkommen so viel als überein kommen, fertig werden, sich vertragen, vergleichen. Grimm This was similarily used like the modern verb übereinkommen which also exists as a noun Übereinkommen (agreement, ...


2

That is very much interesting, because it's not clear at all, and even I stumbled when I saw your question. According to the German Wiktionary, the original meaning of the noun was von einer (finanziellen) Schuld abkommen/lösen, i.e. to pay back one's debt. This usage makes it clear, what you're deviating from. A century later, the meaning of the noun had ...


3

singen -> Gesinge is valid, exactly follows the pattern and style of your other examples while Gesang definitely lacks the despective aspect. So the rule appears to be: drop the -n, add the Ge-.


4

In addition to the other answers: Sometimes the business etiquette is complicated when we meet a colleague multiple times (See e.g. the section Grüßt man sich erneut, wenn man sich im Flur trifft?). It is a bit strange if you repeat a Guten Morgen or Guten Tag each time you meet somebody on the same day. (The link recommend to nod) With Mahlzeit you have ...


1

For me its easy, you say "Mahlzeit" mainly at lunchtime in German. You say it when someone begins his break at work, when you encounter someone at lunch or simply if you believe someone will have lunch break or just had lunch. When someone says "Mahlzeit" to you and you are going to have lunch or just had lunch just reply "Mahlzeit" back,o otherwise just ...


10

It's not restricted to Berlin. Mahlzeit consists of Mahl (=process of eating) and Zeit (=time). So it refers to "the time when you eat" (=mealtime) and is technically not limited to lunchtime. However, it's widely used as kind of a greeting around lunchtime. So, even if you meet someone outside around lunchtime, you could say Mahlzeit. This is acceptable ...


2

Capitalisation of some (not all!) words makes sentences easier to read quickly, for much the same reason that ascenders (as e.g. in t, l, h, k) and descenders (as e.g. in g, p, q, y) do the same. Capitalising all nouns leads to a nice percentage of capitalised words and therefore aids reading. I am not claiming that this is the reason we are doing this, but ...


3

You are correct in observing that German is probably the only language to still capitalise common nouns. (Note the emphasis) First of all, this is because capitalisation can only happen in scripts such as Cyrillic, Greek or Latin which distinguish between capital and lower-case letters. Why they do that can probably be traced back to Charlemagne who let ...



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