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2

Ich wurde 1965 in Graz geboren und bin dort aufgewachsen, habe einige Jahre in der Nähe von Leoben und Bruck/Mur gelebt und lebe seit 1997 in Wien. Brückentag Diesen Begriff habe ich noch nie gehört, und gerade eben zum ersten Mal in meinem Leben gelesen. Dieser Begriff ist im Osten Österreichs völlig ungebräuchlich. Zwickeltag Meiner Beobachtung nach ...


1

I have a list of 15680+ German words with English translations in Excel file (nouns with plurals; verbs in 3 forms; explanatory notes / synonyms to the words for which such explanatory notes / synonyms were available in the original dictionary; 10% of the words have example sentences from Der Spiegel). Written out mostly from Der Spiegel over the past 13 ...


1

As to your question concerning Elektron, people who use this word have either heard it at school or have read "das Elektron". By the way, Latin words ending in -um are all neuter, das Museum. The Greek ending -on is related to Latin -um and Greek words in -on are also neuter. A lot of endings indicate the gender. The Duden Grammar has a whole chapter on ...


4

Well, Germans tend to try to keep the original gender of a loan word (if known and if possible). Virus is Latin (meaning poison), and of neutral gender! This is why people who try to remember their (especially humanistic) education will always try to keep it as a neutral gender: das Virus, and this is especially true in medicine, because in this field, ...


6

Also, do German speakers struggle with technical or specific nouns? Like I am sure the average German couldn't tell what is the gender of an electron or a intake-valve or something. Imagine that your native language had only one vowel. Would you be puzzled about how English-speakers can remember that "electron" is spelled "electron", and not "alactran" ...


4

There are some rules of thumb, but of course they have exceptions. If it ends in -heit, -keit or -ie, it's probably female: die Biologie, die Chemie, die Gemütlichkeit, die Sturheit If it ends in -e, it's probably female: die Blume, die Vase, die Torte; but der Käse, der Hase, der Junge if it ends in -ung, it's probably female: die Umleitung, die Lesung, ...


13

How are kids taught this? I'm guessing it is just repetition and memorization but any other exercises? Kids pick it up through osmosis, just like everybody learns their mother tongue, no additional exercises required. They just hear people talk, repeat and imitate what they said, perhaps get corrected once in a while, and that's that. Also, I wanted ...


0

Berliner (and the like) is usually called an indeclinable adjective, but, at least historically, it is a noun meaning “inhabitant of Berlin”, and, being a noun, it is written with an upper-case B, Hence: der Berliner des Berliners dem Berliner den Berliner die Berliner der Berliner den Berlinern die Berliner In “Berliner Wurst” (etc.) Berliner is ...


0

In my view in such forms as Münchner Bier, Thüringer Bratwürste etc "Berliner" and "Münchner" are no adjectives as they are invariable but genitive plural forms derived from "Bier der Münchner" and "Bratwürste der Thüringer" with the genitive placed before the noun as in Latin Romanorum lingua ( literal: of the Romans + language) or as in literary formulas ...


13

"Berliner" is a standard adjectival derivative of a proper geografical noun which carries the ending -er regardless of the gender of the noun: Der Berliner Raum Die Berliner Sparkasse Das Berliner Straßennetz What is more, "Berliner" is never inflected: Der Berliner Raum Des Berliner Raums Dem Berliner Raum Den Berliner Raum Same with ...


5

Another examples of this kind: Schweizer Käse, Kölner Dom, Frankfurter Würstchen and: des Schweizer Käses, vom Kölner Dom, satt von Frankfurter Würstchen This is somewhat special. Adjectives derived from city names end always with "-er" and are not declinated whatsoever.


1

In fact, it is feminine: "die Sparkasse". But, in this case "Berliner" is related to its home city Berlin and therefore is another form of "Sparkasse of Berlin" or "Sparkasse von Berlin".



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