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4

When you write a German text, then the rules of the German language are valid. Rules from other languages are irrelevant (except for verbatim quotations that are marked as such). This is true for all types of text, also for specialized language (i.e. technical documentation of a computer program). Of course you can use special terms that come from other ...


5

The official German spelling rules mention specialised languages (Fachsprache) at some points. Some of them make exceptions for specialised langugaes, namely regarding the capitalisation of fixed terms from specialised languages (Goldener Schnitt, Schwarze Witwe) and the punctuation of abbrevations (RflEttÜAÜG). But there is no general licence for ...


0

Hubert’s answer nicely explains the pre-reformed orthographic situation. Anything pre-1996 is likely to follow one of the two former standards (or no standard at all) and would therefore prefer to use an apostrophe here to replace the missing e. Following the reform, a large number of formerly required apostrophes were either disallowed completely or made ...


3

When you omit a letter (very often an e at the end of an word), you mark this with an apostrophe: Ruh’ = Ruhe (calm/peace) Wo ich geh’ und steh’ = Wo ich gehe und stehe. But very often this apostrophe is taken as optional, so it is omitted too. But when being strict this is not correct: Ruh = Ruh’ = Ruhe Wo ich geh und steh = Wo ich geh’ und ...



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