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2

I would love to present a different example which gets the point across better, because both participles of that verb can be used more or less idiomaticly on the same noun. The verb I am using is fahren. Das fahrende Mädchen. As Tohuwawohu pointed out, this is pretty much an active participle. The girl is driving. Actively sitting behind the wheel (or ...


3

Generally speaking: the "Partizip 1" forms "anstrengend" / "blondlockend" assume that the respective subject "Woche" / "Mädchen" causes a certain effect or exhibits a certain activity. But this is true only for the case of "anstrengende Wochen", it doesn't apply in the latter case. Instead, having blond, curly hair is simply a state. It may be true if you ...


1

Case 1: Angestrengte Wochen would mean, that the weeks themselves were strained, which misses the point. The weeks were straining to some person, and analogously anstrengend is the word to choose. Case 2: The girl is blonde and has curls. Solution 1 is correct, blondgelockt could also be substituted by blondlockig. It remains unanswered from this sentence, ...


3

The participle construction at the beginning of your sentence indeed replaces a subordinate clause. But that is not relevant for the question whether the finite verb considers that fragment as occupying position zero or position one in the main clause; both cases will lead to the same conclusion. In case of a participle construction, we merely have a ...


6

The finite verb is always in second position. The phrase "Und kaum zu Hause angekommen" takes the first position. The und at the beginning connects to a previous sentence that isn't given in your question. You can drop it entirely for the sake of your question. The und in the main clause, however, connects "Der Himmel war blau" with "Das Wetter war herrlich"...


0

No. I think the word order here is triggered by kaum not by und, which has no impact on word order. "Kaum war ich zu Hause angekommen" = "No sooner had I arrived home". Funnily enough English uses the same inversion of the verb in this kind of clause as German. Without the 'war ich', the sentence is grammatically poor, because you shouldn't have an ...


2

Short answer no. Long answer. "und" can be used optional and using "und" that way is often considered bad german especially if used in written form. In your clause this "und" replaces an information that was given shortly before and thus making the sentence incomplete but still valid for spoken german. If it is to be translated you have to first transmute ...



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