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11

'ter' is a particle from the Netherlands, which means 'zur' in German. With that in mind, a quick search reveals that the dutch word 'Stegen' can be translated to 'Gasse' in German, which makes his name something like Marc-André zur Gasse. It seems that 'ter' would be used to say where someone is coming from, independent from social status. In our ...


8

The role of "ja" is less of emphasis than of surprise: "Wusstest du, dass Tom in seiner Jugend einer der besten Schachspieler Deutschlands war?" "Das ist ja interessant!". It is also often used to express irony, for example if someone shares some gossip that you really don't care about, you could say (in a slightly bored manner) "Das ist ja interessant!" ...


8

We can literally translate this example to reveal the usage of "das" in the example given as demonstrative pronoun: Who is it? Martha, is that you?


7

„Eigentlich“ ist nicht Umgangssprache. Es gibt je nach Situation einem Satz eine andere Betonung, eine andere Note. Die Behauptung, man könne das Wort einfach weglassen (reines, überflüssiges Füllwort), ist so nicht haltbar. Schauen wir uns den ersten Satz an: Eigentlich sollten Sie diese Arbeit doch schon bis gestern erledigt haben. Er lässt sich ...


7

Both are wrong. It is „vorhaben, etwas zu tun“, so the „anfangen“ needs a „zu“, which is why the second variant is wrong. So we are at Ich habe vor, [...] anzufangen. Next, it is „anfangen, etwas zu tun“, so again the „die Hausaufgaben machen“ needs a „zu“: Ich habe vor, anzufangen, die Hausaufgaben zu machen. Now German is somewhat liberal ...


7

In this case 'ne is short for eine, i.e. the indefinite article.


5

"gerade" hat mehrere Bedeutungen, die nicht alle mit "just" übersetzt werden können. Ich beschränke mich hier auf das "just"-Äquivalent. "nur" kann auch mit "only" übersetzt werden: Ich habe nur 5 Euro. Ich habe bloß 5 Euro. ("bloß" wird umgangssprachlich synonym zu "nur" verwendet) Ich habe gerade mal 5 Euro. (für "gerade mal" bitte Thomas' ...


5

In speech we have the possibility to emphasize the meaning. Stress Das and sustain wohl a bit to signify intensification and your accordance. In written text it is hard to avoid misunderstanding, though you can indicate the connotation in the sentences before and after. I think in your example the reader would assume the second variation, because - imho - ...


5

Irgend is used to reinforce uncertainty similar to some/any. Examples Hat irgendwer meine Tasche gesehen? Has anyone seen my bag? Kannst du es irgendwo sehen? Can you see it anywhere? Sie suchen irgendwas. They're looking for something. Regarding the differences you're interested in: irgendwas and etwas are synonyms. ...


5

As a conjunction or as an adverb, so is sometimes translated as so in German. In your case, however, it's an interjection, which is used after a short pause; here to pick up the topic again in order to pose a further question. As a interjection it is always translated as also (which is never translated as also from German to English). In German it's not ...


5

Das Wort „gleich“ kann sehr viele verschiedene Bedeutungen haben. In Duden – Deutsches Universalwörterbuch findet man beispielsweise: gleich I. <Adj.> 1. a) in allen Merkmalen, in jeder Hinsicht übereinstimmend b) miteinander od. mit einem Vergleichsobjekt in bestimmten Merkmalen, in der Art, im Typ übereinstimmend; sich ...


4

My translations for "So, I still don't understand this. Why did you do it that way?" are "Also, ich verstehe das immer noch nicht. Warum hast du das so gemacht?" "Also, das verstehe ich immer noch nicht. Warum hast du das so gemacht?" My apologies for the "so" in the second sentence, it's not meant to muddy the waters. As Em1 said, ...


4

It's like saying "But sure, you're welcome!". It probably means "You might believe it's not ok, BUT it is"


4

Most of the time, irgend- corresponds to no matter who/which/where/how/... or I don't know the details. E. g., irgendjemand, irgendwer -> some/any person (I don't know or don't care who) irgendwo -> at some/any place, no matter where irgendein Auto -> some/any car, no matter which one irgendwelche Insekten -> some/any insects, no matter which kind ...


3

The word hin belongs to the phrase auf XYZ hin. This construction is a circumposition/Zirkumposition* and its meaning is because of XYZ, as a result of XYZ, following XYZ, upon XYZ. Without the word hin this phrase would not have the same meaning (if any in your sentence). * That is a preposition that is split up and wrapped around the noun. The ...


3

In your examples and in almost all cases "bereits" and "schon" are interchangeable. You can simply replace "bereits" with "schon", as it means "already": Als ich zur Party kam, waren die meisten Gäste bereits/schon heimgegangen. When I arrived at the party most of the guests had already left. There are however a few sayings where "schon" can't be ...


3

Kein Unterschied hier: Ich bin kein Professor für Philosophie, habe aber 30 Semester Philosophie studiert. Ich bin kein Professor für Philosophie, habe jedoch 30 Semester Philosophie studiert. Ich bin kein Professor für Philosophie, habe allerdings 30 Semester Philosophie studiert. Nur allerdings möglich: Q: "Kennen Sie sich etwa mit ...


3

There's a list in the german wikipedia: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partikel_%28Grammatik%29 (This list has Duden as it's source...) There's also a definition (kind of) in the grimmsche Wörterbuch for Partikel and some further (historic) references: http://www.woerterbuchnetz.de/DWB?lemma=partikel It is a little bit hard to read due to old language. Hope ...


3

"na" isn't a negation. It doesn't mean "no" in any way. "na" doesn't change the meaning of what you say, it just changes the tone. It mostly acts like a reinforcement of its succeeding words. You can always leave it out, it's somewhat redundant. "nicht" instead has a very clear semantic meaning, it negates the succeeding word.


3

The examples you listed have a different meaning. na is not a negation but an interjection. na klar means: sure while na gut means: if it can't be helped or something. from Wiktionary: ein sehr nuancierter, kontextabhängiger, floskelhafter Ausdruck der Zustimmung, der Überraschung, der Verwunderung, des Zweifels, der Skepsis, der Ablehnung, der ...


3

In diesem Fall steht aber nicht als Konjunktion, sondern als Modalpartikel/Abtönungspartikel. Die Duden Grammatik (hier 7. Auflage) gibt nähere Auskunft: (§ 870) Partikeln kommen besonders häufig in der gesprochenen Sprache vor und erfüllen ganz unterschiedliche Funktionen: als Gradpartikeln geben sie Auskunft über die Intensität von ...


3

German has a three-form-system of answers: ja, doch, nein (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_and_no#Three-form_systems) According to Duden, doch can be used to counter negative implications in questions. (http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/doch_Adverb#Bedeutung3) I would only accept the first sentence as a common use of "doch". In the third it might ...


3

Irgendwo und wo beziehen sich auf einen Ort oder eine Stelle, während irgendwohin und wohin eine Richtung zu einem Ort oder eine Stelle ausdrücken. Das bedeutet, Satz (b) ist richtig. Der Satz (a) kann auch richtig sein, wenn mit hinfliegen gemeint ist, dass man hinfällt. Natürlich würde der Satz, so wie er da steht keinen Sinn ergeben: Ich glaube, er ...


2

A more literal translation might be is it you? The question is not only whether Martha is there (as opposed to no-one), but also who else might be there (e.g. Robert might have heard a noise, so someone is there, but who?).


2

In this sentence the word »mal« is a modal particle. In German there is a part of speach that doesn't exist in English: Modal particles. I have written about those words as an answer to another question: Modal particles The best way to translate those words into any other language is to ignore them. A modal particle for itself has no own meaning. It just ...


2

Basically the two words hierhin and hierher mean the same thing: to this location. We use it alternately but in my opinion hierhin sounds better as hierhersounds like an order.


2

Important note: All examples that I use in this answer are restricted to the situation of just coming from another place to the current location or vice versa. I am aware of that in another context some sentences that I designated as incorrect may be fine. As you already know, the difference between hin and her is whether you go to or away from the ...


2

(b2) is correct for „also“ with the meaning of “hence”. (b1) is nearer to your English sentence. (a1) would not be said at all, (a2) has the same meaning as „Ich verstehe das so noch nicht.“ That is not what you want.


2

The difference is function. All 3 can be a commentating adverb. This is the use that was examplified in the other answer. Ich habe Hunger, ich will aber/jedoch/allerdings nicht essen. Sentences like these will be translated using the English but. However, but is a conjunction so functionally it is NOT a translation. It only translates the idea. Closer ...



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