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14

You're right. It's an archaic variant of werden in the first and third person singular indicative preterite. As some people seem to confuse wart (form of to be) with ward, you find some information on korrekturen.de: [...] Die Form ward gibt es aber auch; es ist die ursprüngliche, heute seltene Form der 1. und 3. Person Singular Indikativ Präteritum von ...


14

Yes, this is passive, and this phrase is certainly used often in office environments. The reason for the passive voice can be to convey that in fact, nobody will read this message - neither the recipient nor their secretaries, deputies, family members or the like. Writing this in active voice ("Niemand wird Ihre Mitteilung lesen.") would sound downright ...


12

Both "von" and "durch" indicate the "Täter" in passive. That is, the agent of the passive action. The Täter becomes the subject when you transform the passive into an active sentence. The difference between "von" and "durch" is that you use durch when the agent takes an instrumental role. So, in your two example sentences, Hans actively ate the apple, but ...


10

It is Perfekt Passiv of bauen ... Vorgangspassiv to be precise. Das Haus wird gebaut. (Präsens) Das Haus ist gebaut worden. (Perfekt) Das Haus wurde gebaut. (Präteritum) I will not give translations as the notion of the tenses in German and English are not the same. Both past forms are to an extend interchangeable. What threw you of was ...


7

That is just how the tenses are done in German... What you try is simply not grammatically correct. I think you are getting confused by the combination of past and passive. You can say Sam wird übergangen which is present tense and passive voice. If you want to put it into past tense, "wird" becomes "wurde". Same with Sie waren ihm abgenommen ...


6

'Werden' actually has quite a few uses. The subtlety is that unlike English, German actually has two distinct forms of passive, normal passive and what we call 'Zustandspassiv' (state or simply static passive). "Das wird gemacht" translates to "it is being done". The action is not finished yet and is still ongoing. "Das wurde gemacht" translates to "it was ...


5

Indeed, Ich werde vergessen can mean anything. You need context to tell its meaning. Here are just a couple of possible sentences in which you can use this construct. Präsens Indikativ Vorgangspassiv (allgemeine Wahrheit): Ich werde dich nie vergessen. Präsens Indikativ Vorgangspassiv (gerade im Moment): Ich glaube, die sind ohne mich losgefahren. ...


5

It depends a little, on how exactly you interpret the "will have" in the English sentence. In numerous languages, future tense is often used to express modality/possibility. Here is an example in English and German: "Wo ist meine Brille?" "Die wird auf dem Schreibtisch sein." Where are my glasses? They will (probably) be on the ...


4

Well, I would say both are Perfekt Passiv mit Modalverb. So, that's a little bit tricky to explain. Short version: One sentence uses the perfect of "müssen", the other the perfect of "werden". Both sentences use the Modalverb "müssen". Both sentences use the auxiliary verb "werden" to build the passive. Präsens of the first sentence: Es muss gemacht ...


4

You're right. The form Es muss gemacht worden sein is perfekt passive with a modal verb (müssen). In this case the subjective modal verb müssen is used to express an assumption. The active form would be (for your example): Er/Sie muss es gemacht haben.


4

Are the reflexive constructions used commonly in everyday speech? Yes, they are. Der Schlüssel wird sich sicher[lich] noch finden is perfectly correct and quite commonly used. To the speaker it's probable that either he himself or somebody else finds the key. Der Schlüssel wird sicher noch gefunden werden is basically the same, but in ...


4

The reflexive constructions you cite (sich finden, sich lesen) are used commonly in everyday speech in these contexts. Das Buch liest sich sehr schnell. is even more common than the passive alternative Das Buch kann schnell gelesen werden.. The reflexive construction you make up (sich schicken) just doesn't exist. The passive construction is to be used ...


4

Im gesprochenen Deutsch wird im Grunde kein Imperfekt verwendet, das Perfekt ist da das allgemeine Vergangenheitstempus. Andererseits vermeidet man im Gesprochenen auch gerne das Passiv, es ist eher Schriftdeutsch mit Anklängen von "Behördendeutsch". Was macht ein Sprecher stattdessen? Aktiv, wenn derjenige "Täter", der etwas tut, wichtig ist (die ...


4

These are semantically completely different expressions: gefragt sein is a fixed expression, a trope, if you will, which means to be in demand On the other hand gefragt werden is directly derived from fragen - ask and means being asked


3

"Wollen" is same as "to want", but sometimes it can be used as "should", but to me as a native speaker this can sound distancing and arrogant. Example: Wollen Sie bitte dies zur Kenntnis nehmen. If someone would write this in an email to me I would be galled. The sentence "Der Hund will draussen bleiben." sounds to me whether someone didn't want to ...


3

Definitely humorous. "Wollen" is a modal verb but it always signals intent. There are phrasings that use it differently Die Hausaufgaben wollen gemacht sein. The homework has to be done/is to be done. Even this sounds quite a lot like "want to" to me, but anyway, this seems different to the dog example though as "bleiben" isn't passive at all.


3

That's passive voice in perfect tense: Das Haus ist 1924 gebaut worden. The house has been built in 1924. Passive in past tense would be Das Haus wurde 1924 gebaut. The house was built in 1924. As to why this passive structure uses "worden" instead of "geworden", here's an explanation I found in a forum post: Die Wäsche ist ...


3

First of all, your German sample text does not end in a relative clause (as your translation does) but is a sequence of to main clauses. To make it a relative clause, it should read Ich habe für euch ein Tutorial gebastelt, das sich gewünscht wurde. But still, it sounds weird (and does so because the "no passive" rule applies). The only way to make it ...


2

In those cases 'werden' indicates passiveness. Someone else does something. If you change it to your alternatives, the meaning of the sentences changes. Similar to English: Sam was disregarded by someone. - Sam disregards someone. Something was taken over by someone. - Something took over someone. Your final example is different. 'Werden' also ...


2

Mir wird nichts gesagt: Absolutely correct. Bei den Kino wird geraucht, trotzdem man nicht kann: First, "Bei den Kino" is grammatically wrong; it should be "Bei dem Kino" or simply "Beim Kino". I think with "at the cinema" you mean inside; unlike the English "at", the German "bei" does not include that. The German "beim Kino" excludes to be inside it, it ...


1

"Mir wird nichts gesagt" is ok. At first sight, the second should be "Beim Kino wird geraucht, obwohl man es nicht kann." But I assume you mean "obwohl man es nicht darf" (i.e. although it is forbidden). And if "at the cinema" means inside the building (while watching films) and not literally *standing outside but near the building', then it should be "Im ...


1

Der Hund will draußen bleiben. --> The (your) dog wants to remain outside. Vs You (customer)! Leave your dog outside! It is indirect and polite. Not directly addressing the customer. Since it's the dog being addressed and the customer is the master of the dog. The customer has the choice of leaving the dog outside or granting him ...


1

No, they are not. Geschätzt and worden are exchanged. So Jeder weiß, dass das Geld immer von den Leuten zu sehr geschätzt worden ist. And Leute is always plural, so I changed it: von den Leuten. If it is an academic exersise, it's ok, but otherwise I'd take the agent, die Leute, out – who else could love the money? But that is a stilistic issue, I ...


1

Don't mix this, I guess this is a "false friend" for native English speakers. The passive of "I build the house/Ich baue das Haus" is "The house is built (by me)/Das Haus wird (von mir) gebaut" and not "Das Haus ist gebaut". The latter would rather mean "The house has been built" or to exaggerate that the "ist" is for describung a state "The house is ...


1

There are two types of passive: "true passive" and "statal passive" (or "Zustandspassiv"). Compare these "true passive" sentences (of which one is analagous to the OP's): Das Haus wird gebaut Das Haus ist gebaut worden to these "statal passive" sentences: Das Haus ist gebaut Das Haus war gebaut According to the Handbuch zur Deutschen ...


1

There are different problems with that sentence, i think. Besides the verb, there's a noun ellipsis, because the noun „im Jahr“ / „in the year“ is missing. Maybe it's easier to recognize with the noun at its place: Das Haus ist im Jahr 1924 gebaut ....



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