Hot answers tagged

17

No, personal names are always spelled as they are officially registered on birth. They do not fall under the changes of rules of New German Orthography.(1) If an ß is not available (on your keyboard), you can use ss instead.(Regel 160)


16

Since the cases in German closely correspond to the cases in Latin, and since the Latin language is such a significant cultural possession of the Roman Catholic church, the name "Jesus Christus" is often declined in German according to the case endings in Latin. The Latin case endings are: Nominative: Jesus Christus Genitive: Jesu Christi Dative: Jesu ...


15

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name ...


14

If the original form of the name was Ruhle without an umlaut, its German pronunciation would be very similar to the word ruler in non-rhotic accents of English (which include Australian English), i.e. with two syllables, unlike rule. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), the pronunciation would be represented as [ˈruːlə]. If, on the other hand, it ...


11

No, they cannot be used interchangeably nowadays. However, spelling used to be less strict, so in older documents you may find several spellings for the same person. Consequently, surnames today often exist in several spellings. There are people called Schulz and people called Schultz. There is Meier and Maier. There is Voss and Voß.


11

Für eine Königin ist es etwas schwerer zu erkennen als für einen König, da die Flexion von Feminina weniger eindeutig ist; deswegen möchte ich Huberts Antwort dahingehend ergänzen: Das ist Heinrich der Dreizehnte. (Nominativ) München ist eine Gründung Heinrichs des Dreizehnten. (Genitiv) Die Untertanen erwiesen Heinrich dem Dreizehnten die ...


11

Wenn die Queen im Nominativ steht: Königin Elisabeth die Zweite besuchte Berlin. Wenn sie selbst im Genitiv steht: Das ist der Hut der Königin Elisabeth der Zweiten. Dativ: Dieser Hut gehört Königin Elisabeth der Zweiten. Akkusativ: Heute sehen wir Königin Elisabeth die Zweite.


11

'ter' is a particle from the Netherlands, which means 'zur' in German. With that in mind, a quick search reveals that the dutch word 'Stegen' can be translated to 'Gasse' in German, which makes his name something like Marc-André zur Gasse. It seems that 'ter' would be used to say where someone is coming from, independent from social status. In our ...


11

The article in the English Wikipedia gives two similar pronunciations /ˈɔɪlər/ (Swiss) and /ˈɔʏlɐ/ (German). I agree with them. The article even has a footnote that explains with references that English-style /ˈjuːlər/ is considered wrong, but it certainly isn’t uncommon. Unlike the variant Lennart or English Leonard, his given name Leonhard is pronounced ...


10

Your name consists of the two parts Thall and Man. The second part is clearly an obsolete or Americanised spelling of Mann, German for man. As you will no doubt be aware, it occurs a lot as the second part of German surnames. The first part is trickier. There is no related German word with double l. There is, in particular, no German word even remotely ...


9

Your finding is entirely correct. Marlene is a contraction fo Maria and Lena (short for Magdalena or Helena). This female name became popular by Marlene Dietrich, but was known before as we can see from this Google Ngram. Etymologic roots of Maria (lat. for Hebrew "Mirjam") come from the Egyptian mry (loved one) and became one of the most popular names in ...


9

How to handle person's names is a question that's quite common in libraries, for example. The "RAK-WB" ("Regeln für die Alphabetische Katalogisierung - Wissenschaftliche Bibliotheken") have a sophisticated system how to handle a person's name ("Ansetzung"), depending mainly on the nationality of that person. You can find more information on M. Payer's paper ...


9

This is one of the instances where English and northern German languages show their relation: A fleet is a saline waterway, channel or inlet, literally meaning "something that flows" - the spelling varies a bit over time, but is recognizable. "Fleth" instead of "fleet" isn't far off. Especially 'h' often sort of a appears/disappears over time in many words. ...


9

What you learnt is correct. You always write the umlaut unless you don’t have it on your keyboard. However especially in names the rules are somewhat flexible. So you might see people using the e behind the vowel instead of the umlaut and if that’s how the name is spelled then the official rule does not apply anymore. This is based on a case by case ...


7

According to Duden – Das Lexikon der Familiennamen, the name Löffler (Middle High German: leffeler) means Löffelmacher and it is indeed a job title for a craftsman who makes wooden spoons.


6

Here is wikipedia's take on the question. Following those rules would sort your list as Beethoven, Dörfener, Dorfer,de Maizière, Mustermann, von Neumann . [So sad you're last, John! But you remain my hero in 20th century mathematics :-). More seriously, the Hungarians call him Neumann János: they put family names before first names, and of course John ...


6

Der Adel ist in Deutschland abgeschafft. Die Präpositionen werden aber als Namensbestandteil fortgeführt. Informell mögen sich die Personen anders nennen lassen, aber informell ist ja ohnehin alles möglich. Formal ist also das Von zu benutzen: Guten Tag Herr von Blau. Gerne treffe ich mich mit Frau von Bülow.


6

The names Rühle/Ruehle do seem to be a bit more common in Germany than Ruhle. On the other hand, if your ancestors spelled their surname Ruehle there was no reason to change it, and if they spelled it Rühle they would most likely have transcribed this as Ruehle right upon entering the country. (PS: But as hobbs pointed out in a comment, it’s quite possible ...


6

Persönliche Einschätzung Ich persönlich würde den Sinn der Großschreibung sofort erfassen und mich über die Hilfe sehr freuen. Als unhöflich empfinde ich das nicht, denn es hilft, „peinliche“ Missverständnisse oder sogar Unhöflichkeiten zu verhindern. Es gibt für mich im Geschäftsverkehr nichts Schlimmeres, als wenn ich nicht weiß, welcher Teil des Namens ...


6

Normally you would use Jesus Christus. So you would say: Das ist Jesus Christus. (This is Jesus Christ) The genitive is Jesu Christi, retaining the Latin form: Das ist einer der Jünger Jesu Christi. (This is an apostle of Jesus Christ.) Der gehört zu Christi Jüngern. (That one is one of Christ's disciples.) Either is often shortened to a ...


5

No. »ss« can not be changed into »ß«. But the other way round is possible. »ss« and »ß« are different. Die Masse means »the mass« (physical property as well as lots of things). But Die Maße means »the measurements« (i.e. lengths) And the two exemplary words are spoken different: A vowel before ss is spoken short, but a vowel before ß is ...


5

In Deutsch wird normalerweise kein Artikel vor Personennamen verwendet. Wie das in der Umgangssprache durchaus übliche Beispiel zeigt, gibt es allerdings ein paar Ausnahmen. Ich zitiere den Wikipedia-Artikel Eigennamen [Nummerierung von mir]: Soll der Person eine bestimmte Eigenschaft zugeschrieben werden, ist jedoch der bestimmte Artikel zu ...


5

As per chirlu's comment, Furtwängler is not an occupational name. It is a toponym, meaning a person from Furtwangen in southwestern Germany.


4

In German you traditionally wrote "Sehr geehrter Herr Graf zu XXX,...". Nowadays you can simply write "Sehr geehrter Graf zu XXX,...". And only a chauffeur or butler are supposed to use "Herr Graf" without the name. Nobility was abolished by the Weimar Republic in 1919. No new titles were to be awarded and existing titles were to be considered as part of ...


4

I know this construct from the region where my ancestors came from (eastern part of Styria in Austria). But instead of »genannt« the latin word »vulgo« is used. »Vulgo« means »commonly«, »generally« or »usually«, but is used here in the sense of »usually named«. This is an examle for such a name: Johann Gruber vulgo Jungerder In other regions of ...


4

Ich dachte eigentlich immer, "von Jan" oder "vom Jan" wäre mehr ein regionaler Unterschied. Wenn jemand "Vom Jan" sagt, würde ich auf eine süddeutsche Herkunft tippen, bei "von Jan" mehr auf nördlich (der Mainlinie oder wasauchimmer man als Trennungslinie sieht ;-)). Nee, Beweise für die These habe ich nicht (genauso wenig wie meine Vorantworter ;-)).


4

I’m going to answer this in German first: Abhängig von den in verschiedenen Regionen Deutschlands gebräuchlichen Mundarten (Dialekten) haben sich verschiedene Schreibweisen für Namen ergeben. Zum Beispiel gibt es den häufigen Name „Schultze“ auch als „Schulze“. Viele Nachnamen in Deutschland wurden im frühen Mittelalter in der Feudalgesellschaft aus den ...


4

Die Zahl wird (wie durch den Punkt angedeutet) als Ordinalzahl gelesen und folgt im Genus dem Geschlecht der Person (Elisabeth die Zweite, Wilhelm der Zweite). Der Kasus richtet sich nach der Rolle im Satz: Elisabeth die Zweite besucht Deutschland. Die anglikanische Kirche wurde von Heinrich dem Achten gegründet. Das Denkmal erinnert an Friedrich ...


4

You already get a lot of answers with a 'No' (what is the correct answer). As a side information: If you are a German and you have a name with an ß you can change your name. This is defined in Allgemeine Verwaltungsvorschrift zum Gesetz über die Änderung von Familiennamen und Vornamen (NamÄndVwV), Nr. 38: Bei Familiennamen mit "ss" oder "ß" sowie bei ...


4

Phonetisch¹ ist der Unterschied zwischen [ˈhɛkl̩] und [ˈhɛkəl] minimal und es gibt einen fließenden Übergang, da [k] als Plosiv natürlicherweise ein Ausatmen, also zumindest ein leichtes Schwa nach sich zieht. Der Unterschied zwischen [ˈhɛkl̩] und [ˈhɛkəl] liegt also darin, ob nur ein minimales Schwa oder mehr vorliegt. Die reale Aussprache ist nah am ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible