Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name ...


11

'ter' is a particle from the Netherlands, which means 'zur' in German. With that in mind, a quick search reveals that the dutch word 'Stegen' can be translated to 'Gasse' in German, which makes his name something like Marc-André zur Gasse. It seems that 'ter' would be used to say where someone is coming from, independent from social status. In our ...


8

How to handle person's names is a question that's quite common in libraries, for example. The "RAK-WB" ("Regeln für die Alphabetische Katalogisierung - Wissenschaftliche Bibliotheken") have a sophisticated system how to handle a person's name ("Ansetzung"), depending mainly on the nationality of that person. You can find more information on M. Payer's paper ...


5

Here is wikipedia's take on the question. Following those rules would sort your list as Beethoven, Dörfener, Dorfer,de Maizière, Mustermann, von Neumann . [So sad you're last, John! But you remain my hero in 20th century mathematics :-). More seriously, the Hungarians call him Neumann János: they put family names before first names, and of course John ...


5

In Deutsch wird normalerweise kein Artikel vor Personennamen verwendet. Wie das in der Umgangssprache durchaus übliche Beispiel zeigt, gibt es allerdings ein paar Ausnahmen. Ich zitiere den Wikipedia-Artikel Eigennamen [Nummerierung von mir]: Soll der Person eine bestimmte Eigenschaft zugeschrieben werden, ist jedoch der bestimmte Artikel zu ...


4

In German you traditionally wrote "Sehr geehrter Herr Graf zu XXX,...". Nowadays you can simply write "Sehr geehrter Graf zu XXX,...". And only a chauffeur or butler are supposed to use "Herr Graf" without the name. Nobility was abolished by the Weimar Republic in 1919. No new titles were to be awarded and existing titles were to be considered as part of ...


4

Ich dachte eigentlich immer, "von Jan" oder "vom Jan" wäre mehr ein regionaler Unterschied. Wenn jemand "Vom Jan" sagt, würde ich auf eine süddeutsche Herkunft tippen, bei "von Jan" mehr auf nördlich (der Mainlinie oder wasauchimmer man als Trennungslinie sieht ;-)). Nee, Beweise für die These habe ich nicht (genauso wenig wie meine Vorantworter ;-)).


3

Anscheinend wird dies durch DIN 5007 festgelegt. Die Primärquelle habe ich nicht gefunden, aber unter diesem Link findet man eine entsprechende Wiedergabe. Beachte aber, dass die Namen in Fließtext als Vorname Nachname und nicht Nachname, Vorname geschrieben werden.


3

Das ist eine knifflige Frage, weil es um einen subtilen Unterschied geht. Genauso richtig wäre nämlich auch der Satz: Den Move würde ich morgen gerne von Jan sehen. Im genannten Beispiel wird aber vom als Kurzform zu von dem eingesetzt. Damit wird auch die Beziehung zur angesprochenen Person verstärkt; man kennt die Person nicht nur, sondern man kennt ...


2

I would sort by lastname. I would ignore umlauts, handle ä like a, o like ö and u like ü. With the starting "Von ", "De " etc. I would also ignore them. My ordering would be: van Beethoven, Ludwig Dörfener, Felix Dorfer, Johannes de Maizière, Hans Mustermann, Anton I don't really know if this is correct, but I would do that this way.


2

In Österreich ist der Unterschied im wesentlichen: gesprochene Sprache mit Artikel, geschriebene Sprache ohne Artikel, es sei denn, man will bewußt den Eindruck einer gesprochenen Erzählung erzielen.


1

I suppose you can't go much wrong with a list of the most common German last names. Wikipedia has this: Müller (miller) Schmidt (smith) Schneider (tailor) Fischer (fisher) May(e)r, Meier etc. (~ farmer, estate manager) Weber (weaver) Schulz (~ mayor, person of authority) Wagner (wainwright) Becker (baker) Hoffmann (man of the court) There's another ...


1

Since you are not asking where it’s commonly used – i.e. South and West, partially at least –, but why a definite article before a given name would be appropriate at all, be assured that this is the very reaction Northerners are likely to show when first encountering this peculiar phrasal structure. After living more than seven years south of the ...


1

You can use it, but you need not do it. Other people may use it out of tradition or with special connotations. For example, this can be used when talking to somebody as if he was a child. Das ist der Martin. Und das ist die Oma Gertrude. …


1

Diacritical characters can be sorted in two different ways: like in the telephone-book, or like in the Duden. The Duden sorts them like the normal character, a=ä, o=ö and so on: Muller, Erika Müller, Franziska Mueller, Gerd Müller, Hansi Muller, Inge but the telephone-book sorts them like ~e: ä=ae, ö=oe Müller, Franziska Mueller, Gerd Müller, Hansi ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible