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22

Du hast ungespeicherte Nachrichten. — You have unsaved messages. Sie haben ungespeicherte Nachrichten. — You have unsaved messages. Both occur, but often neither is used, because it’s usually possible to phrase a dialog or message in an impersonal way without becoming too distant, e.g. passive voice or man. Name hat ungespeicherte Nachrichten. ...


11

Interesting site here on courtesy in 18th century German. 18. Jahrhundert Anreden Of special interest to you perhaps: Plural und Indirektion Eine Plural-Anrede gilt als höflicher als eine Singular-Anrede. Daher ist "Ihr" höflicher als "Du". Noch höflicher ist es, jemanden nicht direkt anzusprechen. In asiatischen Kulturen wird das noch heute ...


10

It depends on the company making the software in question. For example, Facebook always uses "du", Microsoft always uses "Sie", Apple and Google use a mixture, depending on product and context. Typically "Sie" is preferred in more formal/business contexts, while "du" is preferred in more informal/social contexts. To give at least a couple of data points, ...


7

Both do indeed refer to Kontinent. The name Australien is only given as an additional explanation (grammatically an apposition, which is also why it is separated from the remainder of the sentence by commas). Regarding seiner, you seem to misunderstand how it works. Sein behaves like an adjective and agrees in number, case and gender with the following ...


4

Let's start with your last question. I guess the easy solution would be just using dative, but I wish to know how a native speaker would write/speak. A native speaker would use dative, at least most of the time. It depends a little on the preposition. E.g you might read sometimes (even more seldomly hear) dank seiner, but even here the more frequently ...


3

Got an answer from another source (a native German): A corporation like Microsoft or Photoshop would address its customers with "Sie". A game would in most cases not. Set song title Infinitive.


3

Short answer: if in doubt, "Sie". As a German software developer, I try to stay clear from "Sie" or "Du". It is perfectly possible to do so without sounding stilted or weird. For example, instead of "klicken Sie hier, um...", it is perfectly fine to use "Hier klicken, um...". It is also a nice excercise to find ways to write stuff more concise to not even ...


3

It depends on the usage. A formal usage would prefer Sie, a informal usage would use du. It is similar to the real life. In a shop and a restaurant I expect a Sie, in a shop or bar for younger and 'cooler' people a du is ok. Same for the computer. A not so serious classification: Programs in Cobol and Fortran use Sie, Python and Ruby uses du. Another ...


3

[einer Sache] müde sein is an expression used to say "to be tired of [something]". Note that "einer Sache" is in the genitive form. So dessen is the genitive of das = "the thing he was tired of". In this case, that's the fact that Miss Montag kept staring at his lips.


2

Short answer: It sounds strange and you should usually avoid it. However, that does not mean that all of these constructions are wrong. For example, Duden lists as synonyms for meinetwegen: (umgangssprachlich) wegen mir; (landschaftlich, sonst veraltet) wegen meiner You see that it would be wrong to call “wegen meiner” ungrammatical. If you enjoy ...


2

For example google maps recently updated its computer voice and now address its users with du instead of sie. This is because the audience of apps gets younger and younger and sie is more for people 20+. I think Outlook should ever "siez" me. WhatsApp or Facebook can "duz" me.


2

Let's analyze this situation: Tom has a dog, Lisa has a cat, Lara has a guinea pig and Georg has a bird. But you don't know the names of any of those animals: If you know that the animals are male: Tom hat einen Hund. Ich weiß nicht, wie er heißt. OR: Tom hat einen Rüden. Ich weiß nicht, wie er heißt. Lisa hat einen Kater. Ich weiß nicht, wie er ...


1

It is not a relative pronoun, but a demonstrative pronoun, referring forward to the infinitive construction: tired of seeing. Replacing it with the personal pronoun seiner would render the sentence ungrammatical because the infinitive no longer would be connected to the rest; it would also change the meaning, as K. then would be tired of some previously ...


1

Your question is unclear because it seems to assume that ihm is ambiguous as to case in the same way that euch is. But it isn't. Accusative and dative of er are still distinguishable in standard German: ihn vs. ihm. (In many dialects this is no longer the case.) The case system very often provides redundant information. This is one reason why it's generally ...


1

Im Beispiel "Ich habe einen Hund. Sie heißt Pancake." ist das Wort "sie" ein Ersatz für ein anderes Wort. Dieses andere Wort can "Der Hund" sein, aber auch "die Hündin". Ich kann ersetzen: "Ich habe einen Hund. Der Hund heißt Pancake." -> "Er heißt Pancake." "Ich habe einen Hund. Die Hündin heißt Pancake." -> "Sie heißt Pancake." Beides ist ...


1

Ich habe einen Hund. Sie hat Angst vor Rollläden und anderen Hunden. Sie heißt Célia. This is more or less how I would introduce my dog out there. However, I might also say (rarer): Ich habe einen Hund. Er hat Angst vor Rollläden und anderen Hunden. Er heißt Célia. It really depends on how much you want your dog to be recognised as female. Version ...


1

Hund is a generic masculine noun, Katze a generic feminine noun and Eichhörnchen a generic neuter noun. The rule is that you fall back to generic nouns when biological gender is not important. Example: Hunde sind an die Leine zu nehmen. Ich hatte mal einen Hund, der hat sich dauernd gewälzt. Ich hatte in meinem Leben viele Hunde. Ich mag Hunde. Ich hasse ...


1

But with other prepositions accepting Genitive I cannot judge, because I've never heard nor read anstelle meiner or seiner halber which is what one would theoretically become by using the construction Preposition inducing genitive + personal pronoun in genitive in the right order. I as a native speaker would not say seiner halber, ...



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