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11

There are two ways: Use the same pronouns as for the third person and also use the third person for the relative clause’s verb: Ich, der/die rote Haare hat, bin 25 Jahre alt. Du, der/die rote Haare hat, bist 25 Jahre alt. Wir, die rote Haare haben, sind 25 Jahre alt. Ihr, die rote Haare haben, seid 25 Jahre alt. This is rather unusual for the ...


7

Both do indeed refer to Kontinent. The name Australien is only given as an additional explanation (grammatically an apposition, which is also why it is separated from the remainder of the sentence by commas). Regarding seiner, you seem to misunderstand how it works. Sein behaves like an adjective and agrees in number, case and gender with the following ...


6

The article-like forms look like articles but are in fact demonstrative pronouns. Apparantly, they also have a second name deictic pronouns, because they are usually used when pointing at someone/something (Greek δεῖξις, pointing). Which leads us directly to their usage: the use of der in the example is both adding emphasis and implicitly pointing at the ...


5

The first pair of examples should be transformed to: Der Mann war 25 Jahre alt und war noch nie im Ausland (gewesen). Der Mann, der noch nie im Ausland gewesen war, war 25 Jahre alt. If you want to use a subordinate clause, it is much better to embed it into the main clause because only then the two statements get their proper weight and emphasis ...


4

Let's start with your last question. I guess the easy solution would be just using dative, but I wish to know how a native speaker would write/speak. A native speaker would use dative, at least most of the time. It depends a little on the preposition. E.g you might read sometimes (even more seldomly hear) dank seiner, but even here the more frequently ...


4

Because it must be female singular. Check the first sentence: Die Generalität ist ein Geschmeiß des deutschen Volkes! Subject here is "die Generalität", it's female singular. Now on to sentence two: Sie ist ohne Ehre! As "sie ist" is female singular, too, it must refer to "die Generalität" from the preceding sentence. If you would refer to ...


3

Personal pronouns are ambiguous Like in English there is no rule to whom a personal pronoun refers to. So the example sentence where the genders are the same Der Mann jagt den Hund. Er fällt in ein Loch. it is highly ambiguous. It is the man, or the dog who may have fallen into the pit - we can't say who. Gender matters It would be easy to resolve ...


2

The problem with hypothetical questions like this is that, by themselves, these sentences don't convey much meaning and don't truly stand alone. If they're the response to a question like: Wie sollen wir den Hund fangen? ...or a precursor to more information, such as: Seine Tochter hat sein Gips bemalt. ...then the meaning is clear from context. ...


2

Short answer: It sounds strange and you should usually avoid it. However, that does not mean that all of these constructions are wrong. For example, Duden lists as synonyms for meinetwegen: (umgangssprachlich) wegen mir; (landschaftlich, sonst veraltet) wegen meiner You see that it would be wrong to call “wegen meiner” ungrammatical. If you enjoy ...


1

But with other prepositions accepting Genitive I cannot judge, because I've never heard nor read anstelle meiner or seiner halber which is what one would theoretically become by using the construction Preposition inducing genitive + personal pronoun in genitive in the right order. I as a native speaker would not say seiner halber, ...


1

I once got told, that it always refers to the last mentioned, this would be the dog. But you really should not write like that.



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