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10

"deiner Lehrer" is the genitive plural of "dein Lehrer". The construction "einer/eine/eines + genitive plural" corresponds to the English "one of ...", so it's "one of your teachers".


7

There are two subtle differences: alle vs. jeder: alle is referring to the set as a whole. jeder is referring to every member of the set. In most cases, this is equivalent, but not always: Jeder muss ein Boot bauen, um von der Insel zu flüchten. -> Everybody has to have his own boat. Alle müssen ein Boot bauen, um von der Insel zu flüchten. -> There ...


6

Think of that as if the following steps were applied: 1 - ein Lehrer von deinen Lehrern Written like that it's a bit ambiguous, but bear with me. Read it as "one of your teachers", the more logical meaning, rather than "a teacher of your teachers". Now let's replace the "ein Lehrer" with the corresponding pronoun: 2 - einer von deinen Lehrern ...


6

Die Frage ist schon falsch gestellt. Du zitierst die völlig richtige Aussage aus Wiktionary, in der festgestellt wird, dass »man« keine weiteren Formen hat und fragst trotzdem nach dem Genitiv von »man«. Die einzig richtige Antwort lautet daher: Es gibt keinen Genitiv von »man«! Ich stelle aber die Richtigkeit der anderen Aussage aus deinem ...


4

This is very close to the "pluralis majestatis" and is very common in this genre (medieval/fantasy). And yes, it is also common for literature, especially older work. It is a substitute for the polite salutation "Sie". It can easily be formed, as you simply express yourself as if you would talk to more than one person. "Es gehört Ihnen." → "Es ...


3

It's called Höflichkeitsform, Honorificum or Honorativ(um). "Ihr" was replaced by "Sie" in the 19th and 20th century. It sounds more formal and historically authentic so it is often used in medieval or fantastic fiction. http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%B6flichkeitsform


3

"correct" (most widely used) solution here is: Es ist kaputt wegen *dir*.(which is dative) Es ist *deinetwegen* kaputt.(which uses an adverb) correct genitive were: deiner Es ist kaputt wegen *deiner* "wegen deiner" mostly gets replaced by the adverb "deinetwegen" in spoken language, if there is not some object deiner can refer to. If some object is ...


2

Eine Ergänzung vielleicht noch: Ich habe die Erfahrung gemacht, dass es durchaus auch auf die Region ankommt, welches Verhältnis von der/die zu er/sie in der gesprochenen Sprache vorherrscht. Im Rheinland hat der/die zum Beispiel eine sehr hohe Frequenz in der mündlichen Kommunikation und wird auch (natürlich je nach Sprecher) fast durchgehend neutral für ...


1

As a substitute for the genitive one uses "von jemand" in der gesprochenen Sprache. "eines" wird nicht verwendet. Es gibt auch die Form "jemandes/jemands". Mir liegt sie nicht.


1

In harsh words: There's only a barely discernible difference. In general, it doesn't matter which word you use, you equally refer to any, all, every and each object of the group (whatever the group is). While I was sure that there's no difference at all, Toscho just posted an example where "alle" may convey a different meaning than "jeder". While "Jeder ...


1

Keiner/Niemand and Jeder/Alle are often used synonymously. Although there is a little difference: Keiner/Jeder are used for a specific group/selection (e.g. your family), while Niemand/Alle imply a more general statement. "Keiner würde das sagen" -> no one I know would say that, but there might be someone who would or "Jeder würde das sagen" -> everyone I ...


1

Personal pronouns like proper nouns follow the same inflection rules, as is nicely summarized in a table here: canoonet: Personal Pronouns The polite form in adressing people actually is the 3rd person form capitalized. The same inflection rules apply. Now we have to learn by heart which grammatical case goes with any verb. There are no generally valid ...



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