Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

You could just remark Finderlohn! If you know, what you want to pay, you could combine it with the sum you want to pay. Examples:


8

Die letzte Ruhestätte is a popular choice. On a somewhat elevated language level one would write: Jim Morrison fand seine letzte Ruhestätte auf dem Père Lachaise in Paris.


6

In German you use a noun for this: Finderlohn.


5

Not necessarily, but often in the way of you say "fine", and then we go on: Wie geht's? (without the dir) Wie geht's, wie steht's? Wie stehen die Dinge? Alles klar? If you ask "Wie geht es dir?" with more empathy, in the sense of actually want to know how you do: Alles klar/gut/ok/[another positive adjective]? Alles in Ordnung bei dir? If ...


4

It's one of the basic functions of über, meaning lang or während. For me there's no difference in meaning. Maybe the variant without über is even a contraction of the one with it. Additionally, here's a drawing: Fits, doesn't it? Apart from this intuitive approach, I can't find any other (e.g. etymological) "reasons" for über in this context.


4

And for "laid to rest" a nice way of saying that in German would be "zu Grabe getragen" or "zur letzten Ruhe geleitet / gebettet" Jim Morrison wurde in Paris zu Grabe getragen. Jim Morrison wurde in Paris zur letzten Ruhe geleitet / gebettet.


3

Die Duden-Definition ist mir tatäschlich neu. Könnte daran liegen, dass ich es nicht so mit Schwertern habe. Ich hab blankziehen im Kontext sich ausziehen aber schon häufig gehört. Laut NGram-Viewer gibt es den Begriff schon etwa 100 Jahre. Interessanterweise beziehen sich aktuelle Suchergebnisse zumeist auf Degen oder Schwert. In der Umgangssprache ...


3

The other suggestions sound strange, I would use abtrünnig werden. See also this Leo discussion.


3

As I wrote in my comments, this question is partly OT and difficult to answer, as the exact circumstances are not known. Think about that politeness is different in German - English people switched to the polite form "you" at some point and dropped thou, and then you of course became profane. We still have three distinctions (Sie, Sie with given name and ...


2

Duden – Redewendungen, 3. Aufl. Mannheim 2008: in die Röhre gucken (ugs.): 1. leer ausgehen; das Nachsehen haben: (…) In der ersten Bedeutung ist die Herkunft dieser Wendung nicht sicher geklärt. Vielleicht stammt sie aus der Jägersprache, wo »Röhre« den Bau (des Dachses) bezeichnet. In die Röhre kann der Hund hineinsehen, aber nicht ...


2

I'd suggest Sehr geehrter Herr (Dr.) X, gerne bestätige ich Ihre Kontaktanfrage. Vielen Dank und freundliche Grüße, X.Y. Beside this, I second the arguments in Veredomon's answer.


2

We should also note that in Germany asking this will inevitably give you an answer. In a formal setting you may hear a standard "Danke, gut" irrespect of this being correct or not but the less formal it gets the more you will have to be prepared to hear an honest answer even if it was: "Mir geht's nicht so gut. Meine Freundin hat mich gestern verlassen, mein ...


2

Wie läuft's? Alles fit? Was macht das Leben? All of these are very informal. If you want to be formal you use: Wie geht es Ihnen? This does not really change much. Most other ways to ask are for casual contact with relatives or friends.


1

'... has evolved over time' or ' ... has developed over time'. Das muss nicht zwingend veraltet sein, sondern es kann positiv bedeuten, dass damit viel Geschichte verbunden ist, oder - wertfrei - dass es einen komplexen Eindruck macht (weil so viel Entwicklungsgeschichte enthalten ist).


1

There is really not much of a difference, I think. Perhaps den ganzen Tag über could be translated as all day long.


1

Etwas bleibt immer hängen, see [here][1]. Actually it is more abstract and a nearly lteral translation of the Latin Aliquid semper haeret One frequent context is, that bad rumours concerning someone will continue to harm the image, even if an official disclaimer follows up.


1

Two idioms that aren't exactly the same, but should be mentioned: Probieren geht über Studieren. and Wo ein Wille ist, ist auch ein Weg.


1

Some languages have words where other languages need whole sentences for. In Germany we say "Finderlohn" which means "Reward for the finder".



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible