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13

You could just remark Finderlohn! If you know, what you want to pay, you could combine it with the sum you want to pay. Examples:


13

The notion of starting anew is very well transported by the phrase seine Vergangenheit hinter sich lassen – to leave one’s past behind (Or if you want to formulate it as a resolution: “Ich will meine Vergangenheit hinter mir lassen.”) Incidentally, Hulk used this construction in his answer. Your translation is also fine, it depends on the context in ...


8

Gestern can be used in the sense of "past" in German. For example, someone who lives in the past would be jemand, der im Gestern lebt. So parallel to that: Ich kenne kein Gestern (mehr). I don't know a past (anymore) in the sense of I don't know you (anymore). Imho it conveyes what you want to express more precisely than Ich habe keine Vergangenheit, ...


6

Yes, it's correct in that there is no more apposite word to express that specific concept. (There's Vorleben, but that's usually said by others about you, and with a negative connotation.) It's somewhat unfortunate that this word is so long; compared to the dramatic and catchy "I have no past", the German rendition sounds considerably less stylish, but that ...


6

In German you use a noun for this: Finderlohn.


4

There are some alternatives to expressing the basic sentiment of starting with a clean slate: Ich fange (ganz) von vorne an. Ich bin ein neuer Mensch. Ich bin ein unbeschriebenes Blatt.


4

Well, yes, the translation is correct. Note, however, that the concept itself is not a popular one - you can never completely leave your past behind, be it individual or collective. Attempting to do so will be seen as a weakness by many, as a way of attempting to shun responsibility or running away from something horrible instead of confronting it. Saying ...


4

There is not the answer, but I think the most common and formal one would be Vielen herzlichen Dank


3

Compare American usage of "way" as an adverb. We first met way back in the 70s. The meaning of "way back" is: It was a long time ago. And "way back" uses a comparison: It's a long way back to the time we first met.


2

The "best way" depends on the context in which it is used. Without any further details I would say: Vielen, vielen Dank. If it should be a little more personal: Vielen lieben Dank.


2

To thank in a regular way, in Germany, you say Dankeschön! while in Austria you say Danke sehr! But you can use both phrases in both countries. For a more intense way to thank, you can say in both countries: Vielen, vielen Dank or Ich danke vielmals! Sadly, I dont know how they thank in Switzerland, but I am sure, you will be ...


2

The other suggestions so far have been excellent. Yet others in the sense that every saint has a past and every sinner has a future came to my mind: Ich habe keine Leichen im Keller. Ich bin hier völlig unbeleckt. Ich beginne hier mit einer weißen Weste. Ich habe da keine Vorbelastung.


1

Some languages have words where other languages need whole sentences for. In Germany we say "Finderlohn" which means "Reward for the finder".


1

The other suggestions sound strange, I would use abtrünnig werden. See also this Leo discussion.


1

Usually, Germans tend to express emotions in not too many words, so a simple Vielen Dank! would be the most common way to say that. And that is perfectly fine to do so, there is no need to do it more bloomy. I saw the difference when having a friend from the U.S. visiting me here and I just proposed to do a little show-around, and she used words like ...


1

I would go with Vielen, vielen Dank or Ich danke Ihnen sehr which expresses your special gratitude because you explicitly say that it is you who is thanking the other. However... I'm not sure that it is at all common to thank people a lot in business relations in Germany. It would be a weird bit too personal for my taste to express deep ...


1

To emphasize the very, you could say (Meinen) besten Dank. To add a more personal touch, herzlichen instead of besten works fine, in both cases you express above-average gratitude.


1

Supplementary answer: For business settings I would suggest a longer sentence, like Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen herzlichst bedanken. or Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen für Ihr/e/n random positive attribute sehr herzlich bedanken.



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