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27

Heutzutage is directly equivalent. Heutzutage verwendet man Smartphones. Another alternative: Heute verwendet man Smartphones. This is not 100% the same when used without a context like früher. There is another closely linked possibility: Zurzeit verwendet man Smartphones. This would change the meaning though, since it implies that the ...


18

I'm not sure I ever heard a complete saying about this, but usually Germans will make a reference to the "Vorführeffekt" in a situation like this. It pretty literally translates to *"demo effect" and means just that: that demonstrations in themselves have a tendency to go wrong. Note that this also includes demonstrations of negative things, i.e. trying to ...


16

Sorry to interrupt, but the English expression is not now a days, but nowadays, which directly translates to "heutzutage" or "heute" or "in der heutigen Zeit". Keep going. As obviously this is requested in the comments, I'm going to pick up your example, which should be corrected to: Nowadays smartphones are very common And could be translated as ...


10

Both Entschuldigung (which is a noun; it is an abbreviated form of ich bitte um Entschuldigung) and entschuldigen Sie can be used in a similar way to es tut mir leid; unlike it, they can also be used when interrupting someone: Excuse me, what time is it? Entschuldigung, wie spät ist es? (Es tut mir leid, wenn ich störe, aber ... is also possible.) ...


10

Etymologisch hatte ungefähr, früher ohngefehr, die Bedeutung ohne böse Absicht, ohne Hinterlist, die sich danach zu absichtslos, ohne jegliche Absicht, also, zufällig entwickelte. Auch nachzulesen im DWDS. Die ursprüngliche Bedeutung findet sich noch im Substantiv Ungefähr (veraltend), das Zufall, Schicksal bedeutet. Von der alten Bedeutung des Worts ist ...


9

In Anbetracht dessen, dass diese Redewendung aus der überdurchschnittlichen Ausprägung von Rechtshändern in der Bevölkerung entstand, kann man durchaus sagen, dass empfindliche Geister diese als diskriminierend betrachten könnten. Dazu kann man jedoch sagen, dass die Redewendung so geläufig ist und (zumindest in Süddeutschland) so häufig verwendet wird, ...


8

Almost perfect. Yes I would use "Wenn ja," , but if you use this you need to invert the structure of the following sentence, due to the implied "dann": Wenn ja, [dann] möchte ich mit Ihnen sprechen. Alternatively you could also say: "Falls ja", "In dem Falle" a little discurteous: "Dann" because this implies you expect the one you asked to have time ...


7

Unfortunately we can not see an original of the inscription so there is some guessing involved. We likely have a dialect transcription (the 'k' presumably is a sharp 'ß') which in proper German reads as: Da habe ich sechs Pfaffen malen müssen, möge sie alle der Teufel holen. An English translation would then be: So I had to draw six shavelings - ...


7

You are right that “weltweit” doesn’t sound good here. “Auf der ganzen Welt” and “überall auf der Welt” are fine: Du hast wirklich schon überall auf der Welt gelebt! Sie haben wirklich schon auf der ganzen Welt gelebt! The “schon” is not strictly necessary, but it makes the sentence flow better.


7

Coincidence? If you look closer at the data, there is no noticeable decrease in the use of "gern", but a substantial peak in the usage of "gerne". If you go even further back with the statistics, you can also see that the usage pattern change again in the 18th and early 19th century. At least in 1946 and 1947, several reprints of books and material from ...


6

I hope I understood you correctly in that you are not asking about electronic mail here, but rather traditional paper mail. Typically, you would use “nach der Post schauen/sehen”: Hast du heute schon nach der Post geschaut? – Ja, aber es war nur Werbung dabei. But you often refer to the mailbox (Briefkasten) as well: Hast du heute schon in den ...


6

Ich halte die Formulierung in groben Zügen absolut nicht für regional. Es ist halt Hochdeutsch und heisst sowas wie skizzieren -> to sketch. Ich kenne sie von klein auf, und bilde mir ein sie auch noch regelmässig zu hören/lesen. In grossen Zügen dagegen fahre ich allenfalls durch die Gegend... ;-) - will sagen ist mir nun gar nicht geläufig.


5

My favourite words for changing the subject: Wie dem auch sei, wie geht es dir eigentlich/überhaupt? (Literally: However that might be) The überhaupt can be used when you want to add the nuance that it just occured to you that you should have asked this earlier. My Sprachgefühl tells me that eigentlich (or überhaupt)is what really effects the topic ...


5

In your sentence "beunruhigt" is an adjective to Mia. As you noted, it describes her as puzzled, troubled, worried, or discomposed. The sentence does not specify how in particular the visits make her puzzled. The sentence simply states that she sometimes returned in this state. "Von etwas beunruhigt" means "troubled by something", but note that this ...


5

It depends on the (in your example omitted) punctuation. If the waiter asks you Nehmen Sie den Wein aus Deutschland? he means: "Do you take the wine from Germany?" If he says Nehmen Sie den Wein aus Deutschland! he means: "Do take the wine from Germany! I suggest it!". In either case, the wine is supposed to come from Germany. If one talks about ...


4

Generally it is the best way to say it. You might also find it entirely without preposition Wir kennen uns nun schon eine Weile. which is correct too. You could use "einander" instead of "uns" to sound more high brow and you could replace "eine Weile" by "eine Zeit lang". I think this is mostly a regional thing though. Other alternative is Wir ...


4

Your translated answer is not completely correct. When you say Completely up to you. you are basically passing the decision back to the asking person. Even though you have been asked something, you let another one decide. So in german you would for example go with Deine Entscheidung! (You decide!) Es ist voll und ganz (completely) deine ...


4

1) Meine Mutter ist sehr gut darin, das Haus sauber zu halten. 2) Ich bin sehr gut im Lernen der deutschen Sprache. There's a comma after „darin”, but you don't need a comma after „im”. That's the exact translation, but normally you don't say that in German often. We rather use something like this: 1) Meine Mutter hält das Haus sehr gut sauber. ...


3

In my opinion, it depends on the context the sentence is used/in what tone the sentence is uttered. Most likely, I would translate your sentence as follows: I give/assign value to my time. For me, time is money. Time is precious.


3

Actually, "Es tut mir leid" and also "Entschuldigung" are both replacing the old "Verzeihen Sie mir / Verzeihung". "Verzeihung" is/was strictly used to apologize for your own actions. "Es tut mir leid" is in fact also used to apologize for your own actions, however, the cause for the apology is then more serious (it comes close to the more formal "Ich ...


3

Das Wortschatz-Portal der Universität Leipzig führt derzeit 114 Belege für die Wendung in groben Zügen auf, die aus Onlineangeboten von Zeitungen und Fernsehsendern stammen und mehr oder weniger das ganze Sprachgebiet abdecken: Deutschland Nordwest: Leer, Rotenburg (Wümme), Osnabrück, Hameln Nordost: Berlin Mittelwest: Marburg, Fulda, Frankfurt Mittelost: ...


3

The following work: Diese Idee funktioniert wahrscheinlich nicht, aber probieren wir es trotzdem. (=despite, anyway) Diese Idee funktioniert wahrscheinlich nicht, aber probieren wir es irgendwie. (=somehow, clearly different meaning) Diese Idee funktioniert wahrscheinlich nicht, aber wir probieren es sowieso. (=The speaker knows that it will be ...


3

The 'es' does not refer to anything in this context. It is used simply as a formality within the sentence structure, but does not have a meaning. I don't know how good your German is, but this page explains the different contexts of 'es' very well. And in terms of "wie" and "wo", as a native German I would not consider one right or wrong. Both are used and ...


3

I'd translate this to: Wie auch immer; [Hauptsatz] Also: Wie auch immer; wie geht es Dir? sowieso seems wrong to me. A somehow literal translation would be jedenfalls, which sounds wrong to me either.


3

The first sentence is wrong. The verb gehen doesn't work here, because the construction is "to be able to do something" (etwas können). That is why you would say "Deutsch können". Additionally, I would put the time at the beginning of the sentence, that emphasizes that you are a better speaker now: Jetzt kann ich Deutsch besser als früher! Another option ...


3

The list is complete. Just to be strict, there's something you might want to consider: In a poetic context you might stumble upon a vorangestellter Genitiv: …, der über der Königin lange Haaren spricht. (notice the absence of the coma) which actually means: …, der über die langen Haaren der Königin spricht. By the same token, …, der über des ...


3

In addition to c.p.'s answer, there is also the case of attributes prepending a noun in plural. Cases relevant for this question can occur for any transitive, non-reflexive verb. for adjective with direct objects (Is this the correct term?). Transitive, non-reflexive verbs Ich rede über der Hilfe bedürfende Kinder. (der=genitive feminine) Über ...


3

In your English phrase split and merge could be several things grammatically, which may be distinguishable from the context: If somebody is using your software right now and you are instructing them: The imperative of the verbs split and merge. If you are demonstrating how to use your software (by performing the actions yourself): A “regular” form or the ...


3

I'm in IT myself, and it would carry over well for me. Your web designers should understand "split" and "merge"; I'm not sure if your graphics designers will, but you know your audience better than I do. The proposed alternatives "Splitten", "splitte", "teile" etc. sound really awkward to me, because I'm used to the English technical terms for that kind of ...


2

No, I wouldn't use "Sowieso". While the sentence might be understood, the word is commonly used to emphasize the meaning of the rest of the sentence: Das ist sowieso klar. So können wir das sowieso nicht machen. I would use something like Nebenbei, wie geht es Dir? Or, to emphasize that one has forgotten to ask about it: Wie geht es dir überhaupt? ...



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