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5

Formal writing seems decisively in favour of trotz + genitive, as it has been since the mid-19th century. The larger dynamic here is that the use of SMS and the like have democratised writing a bit, therefore dialect (for example Swiss) and vernacular elements generally are being written a bit more. But that is different than any shift in what is printed ...


5

The usage of the word "besagen" is wrong in this context. "Besagen" more or less means something like "to testify"."to bear witness". "... wie die Quellen besagen..."


3

I think, there is a difference between the use of sich melden zu and sich melden für (even though I couldn’t find references). I would use sich melden zu to signal that I am here and ready to work. Whereas with sich melden für I would show the willingness to do the job in general/later. Example with zu: A: “Ich melde mich zum Putzen” B: “Gut, ...


3

Yes Mostly Yes. In case of a housedoor the term »vor« is very clear. If you have a door that separates inside from outside, then »vor der Tür(e)« is always outside. If you think of a windows, it is not so clear. In this case it depends on the context. No. »Hinter« is always at the opposite side of the person. So in your example (window) »vor« and »hinter« ...


3

Vor is a tricky little preposition in this context. It can come in two forms. As part of a set phrase. vor der Tür / vor dem Fenster Always refering to the outside of an enclosed space, typically a room or house, but also a vehicle. As part of the contrasting pair vor etwas / hinter etwas With vor describing something between the observer and a second ...


3

I'm taking it, from your question, that you principally have a good understanding of the overall meaning of the statement. I'll just quickly show my own translation of the highlighted part with some context: ... Exogamy, in its origin - meaning both in the temporal and semantic sense - has nothing to do with Totemism. Or a bit less freely ... ...


2

Beide genannten Konjunktionen, während und wobei, können sowohl Gleichzeitigkeit als auch Gegensätzlichlichkeit ausdrücken, allerdings bezieht sich wobei stärker auf die Handlung des Subjekts und während stärker auf den Zeitraum des Hauptsatzes. Im Beispiel wäre daher während eindeutig idiomatischer. Würde das Subjekt nicht von er auf sie wechseln, wäre auch ...


2

I would disagree. He thinks theres an "Anliegen", and he's glad because of that. (Er freut sich ÜBER das Anliegen (which he thinks there would be)) The other possibility would be, he KNOWS theres an "Anliegen", and he can't await to hear it. (Er freut sich AUF das Anliegen)


2

The prepositions are correct. There is this really cool website, which tells you how to handle german words: http://www.dwds.de/?qu=Zahlung When you have a look at the fourth box (DWDS-Wortprofil 3.0) you'll find a tab which says "Zahlung hat Präpositionalgruppe". In this tab you'll find the most common examples coordinating with "Zahlung" and these can ...


2

Nach --> In die Richtung. Normally you go there to visit it and go inside it. So you'd say:"Ich gehe ins Disney-land"


2

Both are grammatically acceptable, and both can be used interchangeably. In the prepositional form, the preposition rules the case - "von" wants dative case, so "Menschen" is dative plural. In the form without a preposition, the case is genitive (Finding out is not exactly easy, but works best if you try and add an adjective to the substantive, like) ...


2

Canoo.net sums it up nicely. The general rule is: Use genitive. Then the following exceptions apply: Since genitive plural is unmarked, always use dative plural if there is no article and there are no adjectives; Always use (uninflected) dative singular for single nouns without adjectives or article; You may use dative if the noun has no article, only ...


2

It's correct as well, and there is no difference in meaning. There is only a small difference in usage: "sich melden zu" can only be used with an activity, say, sich zum Dienst melden sich zum Geschirrspülen melden whereas "sich melden für" can be used with an activity, but also with a place or time (where/when the activity takes place) or an ...



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