Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Auf is and should be used for islands of any kind, as long as you’re talking about the island being an island. Als wir auf Grönland an Land gegangen sind, … Auf der Herreninsel steht ein Königsschloss. Auf Malta kommen immer wieder Flüchtligsschiffe an. Auf Kuba gibt es gute Zigarren. Auf Lummerland gibt es zwei Berge, viele Tunnels und Gleise. ...


2

As a German mother tongue speaker, the following permutations sound natural to me: Eine Krähe war mit mir aus der Stadt gezogen. Mit mir war eine Krähe aus der Stadt gezogen. Aus der Stadt war eine Krähe mit mir gezogen. Aus der Stadt war mit mir eine Krähe gezogen. Aus der Stadt gezogen war mit mir eine Krähe. The difference seems to be one of ...


2

Well, there is this rule... of course there is a rule for that :) The ones studying German calls it TE-KA-MO-LO, that describes how the sentence should be built. That first should go temporal part, then causal, then modal (your ex: mit mir) and lastly comes the location describing part (your ex: aus der Stadt). Have a look: ...


2

Auf can be used with all islands, even somewhat larger ones: auf Sylt, auf Malta, auf Madagaskar ... You can always use in for countries proper, however, regardless of their being an island, i.e. in Kuba is perfectly fine. In Grönland sounds fine, too, to my native ears. Auf Venedig, however, does not: there's not a single island by that name, as the City of ...


1

Word order in German sentences is almost entirely free. The main constraint is the verb being in second position (although some conjunctions occupy the zero-position, forcing the verb to an effective third, counting the conjunction) and the Verbklammer to be picked up at the end. Some orders, while possible, are less likely, others add emphasis from minute ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible