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16

Definitely "mit". "Aus" is appropriate if the thing is made from that material. A table is "aus Holz" and a window is "aus Glas". Beer is made "aus Hopfen, Malz, Hefe und Wasser". But all these things have been transformed to become what they're now. A sandwich made "aus Fisch" would mean that the bun is made from fish, the cheese is, too and there's fish ...


13

sich freuen auf is used when you are looking forward to something, i.e. in an anticipatory context: Ich freue mich auf die Sommerferien! / Ich freue mich auf deinen Besuch. (future event) sich freuen über is used when you are excited about something, e.g. a gift or present or a general event. Ich freue mich über die Beförderung! / Ich freue mich ...


10

"auf" would be the choice here. You can find numerous examples by doing a web search for "auf www". "an" does not fit. "bei" would have a meaning of "near" or "close to" in this context which would sound weird for a web address. Edit: As suggested in the comments, "unter" is also good in this case. There is a subtle difference though: "auf" refers to the ...


9

In your example, the grammatical case of the noun „Kino“ depends on the preposition „in“. The difficulty here is that „in“ may require dative or accusative, depending on the sense of the sentence: If „in“ indicates a direction/movement, you'll have to use accusative: „Wir gehen in das Kino“ (or, commonly, „ins Kino“ - merging „in“ and „das“). „Wir ...


8

If zugunsten treated the first person pronouns the same way wegen did, it would be zumeinergunsten. But it doesn't. zugunsten is a concentrated form of the older zu Gunsten. That's why, in connection with the first person pronouns it becomes zu meinen Gunsten


8

This is perfectly fine. The Duden explains zu Deutsch with auf Deutsch [heißt das]. It is also mentioned in the 21st edition of the book as „das heißt auf/zu Deutsch“ (p. 210). Maybe it is considered a little old-fashioned these days, but I hear and read it quite often. I haven’t heard it as zu Englisch or in connection with other languages.


8

Duolingo is correct here. The preposition "in" can demand the accusative as well, and that isn't even a special case. It goes with the dative if it answers a "Wo?" or "Wann?" question, but the accusative for a "Wohin?" question. In the example you could think of "Wohin bist Du gekommen? - In das Zimmer.", so it's the accusative here. Other examples: Er ...


7

Auf den Bergen (1) literally means on top of/on some mountains, whereas In den Bergen   (2) is denoting a mountaneous region. Examples: (1) Auf dem Berg gibt es kein Gipfelkreuz. (1) Auf den Berg klettern. (1) Auf diesen Bergen gibt es kaum Bäume. (2) Wir verbringen unseren Urlaub in den Bergen. (2) Ich bin in den Bergen ...


7

I agree with the existent answer, but partially. Actually that is region dependent. To be fair with Austria and Switzerland Ich habe dieses Buch {für · um} 20 Euro gekauft. depending where you are. Same case for verkaufen.


7

You're looking for "für" (I bought the dress in exchange for 20€). Ich kaufte das Kleid für zwanzig Euro [an]. Ich verkaufte das Kleid für dreizehn Euro.


7

You might say: Ich halte dich für meinen älteren Bruder. A German will probably understand what you mean, but there are other words for expressing this, such as: Ich betrachte dich als meinen älteren Bruder. Du bist für mich wie ein älterer Bruder. The phrase etw. für etw. halten might be better used in sentences like the following: Er ...


7

One might add that sometimes, especially in colloquial use this phrase is used to indicate that a simplifying explanation is to come. E.g. in a presentation: "Multivariate Regressionsanalyse der Umsatzstruktur hat ergeben, dass das Geschlecht den Haupteinflussfaktor für den Erwerb von Cola Light ggu. Cola bildet. Zu Deutsch: Cola Light wird fast ...


7

Die beiden Formulierungen haben unterschiedliche Bedeutungen: die Schlacht um [Objekt] Hier ist [Objekt] das Objekt, um das gekämpft wird. Wer die Schlacht gewinnt, wird Eigentümer dieses Objekts. Das kann ein Gebäude, ein Landstrich oder sogar ein ganzer Staat sein. Auch eine Schlacht um ein bestimmtes Recht (z.B. Erbfolge) ist denkbar. die Schlacht ...


7

Both algebraical constructs can be expressed using modulo. Factorized constructs like $F/\sigma_n$ are read F durch die symmetrische Gruppe or F (faktorisiert) nach der symmetrischen Gruppe or F modulo symmetrische Gruppe or F modulo der symmetrischen Gruppe (I haven't heard anybody say F modulo die symmetrische Gruppe but I wouldn't even bother if I ...


7

"auf etwas stoßen" is used if you find/discover/explore something (e.g. minerals, resources) Ich bin auf Bodenschätze gestoßen. "gegen etwas stoßen" is used if you collide with something (e.g. doors/tables/stones/windows) Er ist gegen die Tür gestoßen. "an etwas stoßen" is used if you collide with something either physically (table) or ideologically ...


7

Yes, definitely "mit". "Aus ..." would be "made of". A toy made of wood = Ein Spielzeug aus Holz A sandwich with ham = Ein Sandwich mit Schinken


6

A research on books.google.com shows that something happened at the start of the last century. Look at the graphs, the word frequency in books changed around 1900-1905. Maybe it goes back to the "German Orthographic Conference of 1901"? That's only a guess. The Orthographic Conference of 1901 (also called the Berlin II Orthographic Conference) was a ...


6

I think what confuses you here is seeing the dative case as simply meaning indirect object. In Proto-Indo-European (PIE, the theoretical language which all European languages evolved from) there were eight cases, including the four which remain in modern German; one of the others was the locative case, used for marking the location where something takes ...


6

Both ones are correct. The first gains the time aspect a bit more. And it prevents the misunderstanding it could take 2 weeks to go home.


6

Ich bezeichne im Folgenden das Wort, dem der Genitiv zugeordnet wird, als Substantiv. Außerdem schreibe ich nicht über die normalen vorangestellten Genitive von Eigennamen. Der Reihe nach: 0) Der vorangestellte Genitiv ersetzt einen bestimmten Artikel, es ist also »des Schäfers Haus« (das Haus des Schäfers) oder »eines Schäfers Haus« (das Haus eines ...


6

Your sentences are almost correct, well done. Indeed the preposition used with entwickelt is in. There are few minor improvements for style only: Reading may be easier if we do not omit the dass introducing the nested relative clause. We then can use a zu construction in the second sentence to avoid a double dass. The word order in the relative clause ...


6

MIT would be best expressing contains. AUS means the major part is eg. fish, a baguette aus fish would not be bread but fish


6

Auch wenn es heißt Ich interessiere mich für... so ist Ich bin interessiert an... doch eine andere Formulierung und der Infinitiv "interessiert sein" braucht "an" einfach... weil. Das hat sich so entwickelt und nun ist "an" idiomatisch und "für" nicht (n-Gram), während es für "sich interessieren" anders ist.


5

It is a bit hard to judge that without context. Without context I would think that Das Buch gehört uns. is correct, it means that we own the book. On the other hand Das Buch gehört zu uns. means that we and the book belong together or that the book is a part of. That would be somewhat unusual, but I can imagine contexts in which that would be ...


5

There are different ways depending a bit on the medium. For WhatsApp you got it right using "per", which is like "via WhatsApp": Ich schreibe Dir per WhatsApp. Wir schreiben uns per WhatsApp. When it comes to SMS - as discussed in the comments, you can use either: Ich melde mich per SMS bei Dir. Or more commonly: Ich schreibe/schicke Dir ...


5

Ich kämpfe für X - i am X's agent. Ich kämpfe um X - X is at stake and it is not clear yet who will get X in the end. Ein sinnvolles Beispiel, in dem beides vorkommt: Ich kämpfe für Borussia Dortmund um den Pokal.


5

Very simply: No. You can sometimes do it, but here that would lead to confusion as to what was given and what was receiving. In cases where the roles are clear, either by context or their cases, you can in non-formal speak do this. als Preis wurde Mark Wurst übergeben. OR als Preis wurde Wurst an Mark übergeben. as you can see here: The an ...


5

Aus In a local sense, "aus" is the opposite of English "in/into". So it carries the idea of "out of". It is no problem to understand why it is used in context of buildings and stuff you can enter. Ich gehe aus dem Haus. However, it is not quite so obvious why it would be used for countries and cities. I think in German those are just considered ...


5

Saying "Aus der Fähre fahren" isn't quite common in german (but still valid). You would normally say "Von der Fähre fahren". The difference is "Aus der Fähre fahren" means "Driving out of the ferry" while "Von der Fähre fahren" says "Driving off the ferry" which is quite more common.



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