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0

This is quite tricky to answer because there is more than one aspect you have to take into account. Gegenüber is placed in front of a noun only as an exception to the rule. It is usually placed after the noun. Here are some examples from duden.de: gegenüber dem Rathaus / (auch:) dem Rathaus gegenüber steht die Kirche Ludwigshafen liegt Mannheim gegenüber ...


5

"Entsprechend" is transparently derived from a verb that takes a dative, and as you would expect, it takes a dative itself. People using a genitive are simply wrong, possibly due to hypercorrection (the genitive is slowly being lost and replaced with the dative generally, so it happens that someone thinks a dative should really be a genitive even when it ...


-1

I would say sprechen von/über are interchangeable.


2

That's probably the most accurate one: In spite of all contrary efforts museums are still considered as outdated and uncool, especially among young people. trotz: in spite of nach wie vor: still gerade: especially aller: of all


4

Nach wie vor is a fixed expression. Its meaning is simply: still. Common synonyms are immer noch and weiterhin. See Duden, Wiktionary. Translation are provided by any bilingual dictionary, e.g. dict.cc or Pons. You can grasp its meaning this way: Nach refers to a time after something. Vor refers to a time before something. Wie is used for comparison. Nach ...


6

Wow, this one is hard. A very good idea is distinguishing between topics and people (like Kilian did). Maybe some more examples will help. You usually talk about a topic and generalize it to some point. The German "über" does the same just like in "Übersicht". You ask somebody to tell you about something to get an impression. When I tell you something about ...


5

No two constructions are ever exactly equivalent, but as a native speaker I feel that "reden von" and "reden über" are pretty close to indistinguishable. One slight trend that I can see is when talking of people. "Reden über" tends to be used in a judgmental way. For instance, "It's not nice to talk about other people when they are absent" would more often ...


3

If you wanna say I am going to Anna's house, you say : Ich gehe zu Annas Haus. Or simply : Ich gehe zu Anna. I am going to correct your sentence in number 1. It should be : Ich bin bei Anna (zu Hause). It means that you are at her house.


5

The preposition to in to go to someone/something is (usually) translated as zu or nach, depending on the target. There were already quite a few question on that, which should fully answer your question. Using “nach” or “zu” for landmarks and similar Richtungen und Ziele: Wir fahren “nach / in / zu / an” [Artikel] XYZ? Preposition for “going to your house” ...


1

Number two is correct. Ich gehe zu Anna nach Hause. Trust me, I am a native German.


2

There's no error in the first part (wo?). At least, I didn't spot any. There are just a few errors in the second part (wohin?). Though, a few notes on that. Using "gehen" is not idiomatic for all these examples. For example, you don't go to an island and you don't go on the sea. Technically, you can create some context where go is appropriate, but it's ...


0

From my own experience in learning the language, there is this small difference between the "rule" and the "used". In the Germany language, you will find so many rules, and for EACH rule you definitely find an exception. Being said, I would suggest you to learn the prepositions in the language in a context. Never translate it or just memorise it with one ...


4

Jmdm. (Dat.) etw. (Akk.) widmen wird wie z. B. auch "schenken" nicht mit einer Präposition benutzt. Es muss deshalb heißen: Gewidmet Frau A und Herrn B. Meinen Eltern gewidmet. Er widmete seine Dissertation seinen Eltern.


0

The preposition does not matter in my experience. Having grown up in Southern Germany, geduldig mit is a little more common than the geduldig gegenüber, but both are correct. Dito for Geduld mit/gegenüber. The benefactor of patience is more interesting here, I think. While there might be special texts using it that way, I don't think you can have Geduld ...


0

You use die Geduld for sentences like: Ich habe viel Geduld. (I have a lot of patience.) Geduldig sein, on the other hand, means being patient. Germans also say habe (etwas) Geduld (have some patience) more often instead of sei geduldig.


1

Es genügt "Danke, Dir/Ihnen auch", ja nach Bekanntheits-/Höflichkeitsgrad. Um auf den entsprechenden EDIT der Frage zu antworten: Nein, an und zu können in diesem Zusammenhang nicht verwendet werden. für dich wäre möglich.


3

Die Antworten 1-3 sind IMHO grammatikalisch falsch. Man sagt nicht Ein frohes neues Jahr zu oder an Dich. Uwe's Antwort gibt den korrekten Ausdruck. Man könnte auch sagen Ein frohes neues Jahr auch für Dich.


8

Auch Dir ein frohes neues Jahr. Bei Wünschen dieser Art bleiben häufig einige Satzteile implizit. Der ursprüngliche Wunsch "Frohes neues Jahr" steht eigentlich für "Ich wünsche Dir ein frohes neues Jahr". Die Antwort darauf ist "Ich wünsche auch Dir ein frohes neues Jahr", und da Subjekt und Verb wieder implizit bleiben, ergibt sich "Auch Dir ein frohes ...


1

A direct translation could be: "Was für eine Tierart interessiert sie?" I'm native German, but my grammar knowledge is bad, hence I'm bad in arguing why I did choose this solution. You don't need the second für. But you have to amend interessieren to interessiert. See the -> Duden website entry for all the cases. In this sentence you talk directly to ...


0

Beide. Mehr ist nicht zu sagen; beide sind korrekt.



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