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3

As a general rule, the gender (+ number) of the pronoun in the following sentence is determined by the gender of the noun it is referring to. However, there may be some deviations: (1) Das Mädchen weint. Es ist traurig. (2) Das Mädchen weint. Sie (?) ist traurig. Variant (1) is correct in any case. Sometimes you can read sentences like in (2). ...


0

Personal pronouns stand for nouns, they always match case, number and gender. Das Mädchen weint. Es (das Mädchen) ist traurig. Die Stadt ist schön. Sie(die Stadt) gefällt mir. If you now have a noun witch is a proper noun, the case, number and gender matches too: Ich studiere an der HU. Sie (die HU) ist eine tolle Uni. Ich war gestern in Frankfurt und ...


1

As personal pronouns stand for nouns, they are supposed to be of matching case, number and gender. When it comes to proper nouns, it's not that simple: But the first one is not quite one, rather a practical mixture, since it's "head" is a common noun - of which you know the gender. Luckily, cities are always replaced with the neuter personal pronoun(s) - ...


5

Take the same sentences without selbst. First sentence: "He is proud of himself". Second sentence: "He is proud of him." sich → himself ihn → him (someone else than the subject) Add selbst again. The confusing part is the similarity between ihn selbst and himself, which are not the same. For reflexivity, as can be seen from above, ...


1

A reflexive verb usually comes with a dative pronoun when there is an additional direct object: sich etwas merken sich etwas denken sich Sorgen/Mühe machen (in all of these cases sich is dative) Now, sich schwertun doesn't come with a direct object, but rather with a noun phrase (damit, mit dem [...]). And as most other reflexive verbs with an ...


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Ich glaube, das ist ein typischer Fall für einen unsicheren Bereich. Die Sprecher verstehen nicht mehr, warum es traditionellerweise heißt "Ich tue mich schwer" und gebrauchen den nach ihrem Empfinden logischeren Dativ. Hier scheint sich ein Sprachwandel abzuzeichnen. Wenn man den Akkusativ nicht mehr logisch begründen kann und nur noch, wie Duden, die ...


5

Der Atlas Alltagssprache hat sich mit dieser Fragestellung schon auseinandergesetzt und hat folgende regionale Verteilung von mir / mich festgestellt:           Es fällt auf, dass fast im gesamten Norden die Akkusativ-Variante mit mich vorherrscht. Im Süden sieht die Sache schon weniger klar aus. In Teilen der ...


0

From my own feeling as a native speaker from Berlin the meaning of the phrases is slightly different: "Du tust dich schwer" Seems to translate into: "You don't have the skill for doing this easily." "You aren't yet finished and might take some additional time" The focus is on the effect on the task at hand. "Du tust dir schwer" would rather be: "It's ...


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The use of "deren" in the above quote taken from Der Spiegel is careless journalistic style. The last noun is "ein Bürgerrechtler (singular). Then he continues with "deren" and refers to the plural form "die Bürgerrechtler. That's botch. By the way, "deren" is a relative pronoun, not a demonstrative prounoun as in: Autoren, deren Bücher viel gelesen werden.


5

The meaning of the first sentence is that Gauck was a "Bürgerrechtler", thus he belonged to the group of all "Bürgerrechtler". That's why the author uses the plural form "deren" in the second sentence, because it is the notion of freedom of the whole group that he is referring to.


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Genitive: dessen (m) - deren (f) - dessen (n) - deren (pl) Dative: dem (m) - der (f) - dem (n) - denen (pl)


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Quite an interesting problem, because I would have been stalwart about rejecting "mir". However, COSMAS II lists about 3/4 for mich and 1/4 for mir; and as it draws heavily from more formal contexts, it would be difficult to just disregard "mir" as wrong. But looking at the term, I think that it sounds wrong when just looking at the parts. I can wash my ...


1

According to Duden (Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007) sich mostly is in accusative case, only rarely it is in dative case: Ich habe mich / mir in der Schule nicht schwer getan.*



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