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38

s and ch are spoken separately, if (and almost only if, see below) they are meeting due to some sort of word composition. The diminutive forms you give are examples for this: For instance, in Höschen is a composite of the “umlauted” stem of Hose, i.e., Hös-, and the diminutive suffix -chen. Something similar can happen with regular word composition, like in ...


26

The 'correct' standard German pronunciation for China is /'ç.../) but in Southern Germany and in Austria they say 'Kina' (/'k.../). In some regions (for example where I live) some people say 'Schina' (/'ʃ.../), but they also say 'isch' instead of 'ich' or 'Mädschen' instead of 'Mädchen'. That is, we pronounce the 'ch' in a different way, but that's not ...


25

In standard German pronunciation, this happens when (and only when) st is the first part of a syllable. Straße -- Stra·ße -- /ˈʃt/ verstehen -- ver·ste·hen -- /ˈʃt/ Kasten -- kas·ten -- /st/ bester -- bes·ter -- /st/ fast -- fast -- /st/ I'll add that there are a few loan words that can be pronounced without the SH sound, e.g. Star, ...


25

This is a form of a phenomenon called hypercorrection. The problem is that the sound [w] does not exist in German and indeed there are many German speaking people who are unable or unaware to pronounce this sound and use [v] instead. This is what makes the traditional German accent. (Mainly spoken by people who learned English rather late or only know some ...


17

One possibility would be: Eins durch (die) fünfte Wurzel aus a plus c (zum) Quadrat. And Eins durch (die) dritte Wurzel aus p. So in general, you would use: Zähler durch Nenner for fractions and x-te Wurzel aus for the root part. So your second guess was quite right. -tel is normally just used for very simple fractions like ⅓ (ein ...


15

The OP seems to have a good background in syllable structure, but I'll give some background in that for those who might not. This phenomenon is known as final obstruent devoicing. An obstruent is a consonant made by constricting airflow. In German, the relevant ones are (in IPA): stops (a.k.a. plosives): /b,p/ /d,t/ /g,k/ fricatives: /v,f/ /z,s/ /ʒ,ʃ/ ...


15

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name ...


15

Both words are pronounced the same (in standard German): [ˈzaɪ̯tn̩], singular [ˈzaɪ̯tə]; source: Duden-Aussprachewörterbuch (3rd ed., 1990). German orthography has a tendency to separate homophones wherever possible; similar cases are Leib/Laib, Lärche/Lerche.


13

There are regional differences. In Austria and the southern areas of Germany, you will hear Honig like "Honik" König like "Könik" When I took speech and drama lessons half a life time ago, it was pointed out that these words actually rhyme with "ich", so /ɪç/ is correct. Honig is pronounced like "Honich" König is pronounced like "Könich" wenig is ...


13

Sie is always pronounced the same. The pronunciation of ihr and er really only differs in the starting vowel — although the h demands the long pronunciation of i, the e of er is equally long.


13

It's from Latin, servus meaning slave, servant. So when someone greets you, Servus! it meant originally "[I am your] servant" but it is nowadays only a friendly greeting, like "Hi!" in English. Think of old-fashioned sign-offs in English letter-writing: Your obdt. & humble servant You will hear "Servus!" much more often in southern ...


13

I never heard Germans (including myself) pronounce it other than eye-tee. I also think that this is the correct way to pronounce it since Information Technology is an English term and therefore should be pronounced English, not German. However if IT would refer to Informationstechnologie it is a German word and should be pronounced German. Though ...


12

Pommes Frites is of French/Belgian origin and therefore pronounced (almost) as in French, with the typical German errors in speaking French. Germans pronounce either /pɔm fʀɪts/ (this is more common) or /pɔm fʀɪt/ (which is the correct French pronounciation). Regional short forms are Pommes (pronounced /pɔməs/) and Fritten (/fʀɪtn/). In the short form ...


12

/mɪlç/ is Standard German. The other one is most likely the result of the speaker having an accent. Some German dialects, e.g. Swabian (however obviously not in this case according to the comments :-) ), often pronounce ch as the IPA sound /ʃ/. And native speakers with that dialect often can't drop that habit even if they try to speak Standard German. ...


12

Definitely we Germans pronounce those "Xs" as /ks/. And I doubt, that I understand /se:nɔngas/ immediately. But after a short time I would learn to understand your way to pronounce this character. Though I think it depends on your audience. I don't think it would be a great handicap in technical business talk (compared to knowing the vocabulary you are ...


12

Ich komme aus der Stadt Salzburg. Wir sagen im Dialekt meist Soizbuag Personen aus Salzburg heissen Soizbuaga das g wird gesprochen. Vorsicht: Die Stadt Salzburg trägt den selben Namen wie das umgebende Bundesland Salzburg. Das kann zu Verwechslungen führen.


12

"Rules" for pronunciations are merely descriptive not prescriptive. The pronounciation depends on the whole word. The numbers up until 20 were more often used than numbers greater than 20 when the German language developed. That's why the pronunciation of "vierzehn" could develop more independently from "vier" than for example "vierhundert". So, the word ...


12

Phonetics do not fully determine the spelling in German. For instance, terminal devoicing is not reflected in the orthography ("Wand" = [vant]), and vowel length can be indicated in several ways ("e" in "Weg", "ee" in "See", and "eh" in "Mehl" represent the same vowel [eː]). There are some phonemes that are omitted very frequently. The most important case ...


11

In all languages including German spelling evolved over time with no fixed rules on ortography or spelling. Nevertheless people tried to find letters for phonetically similar sounds. In the family of phonetically related letters for the modern 'F' we can find the following, also relevant for "father", and "Vater" which have a common Indo-European root with ...


11

I think it's true, and I think it's unfortunate, and I think I am as guilty as most Germans of this: An accent somehow labels you, and different accents come with different labels. Of course, which accent provokes which response is an individual matter (although there are probably statistically valid general tendencies) which depends on both the listener ...


10

Die deutsche Wikipedia meint u.a. folgendes zum s-Plural: Heute gehört die s-Endung zum Standard der deutschen Pluralbildung. Sie wird immer verwendet, wenn keine andere Möglichkeit vorhanden ist (unter anderem, wenn man das Wort nicht durch Analogie zu anderen Pluralformen einordnen kann), zum Beispiel bei Akronymen und vielen ...


10

Essentially, the letter "y" itself is no vowel in the German Language. The letter that are vowels in German are: a, ä, e, i, o, ö, u, ü WIKIPEDIA (On Wikipedia there is also mentioned É == ee, as in "Varieté" .) Moreover, they WIKI article says that the letter "y" can be accounted as a vowel, since its pronunciation is often like the German "ü". In ...


10

Laut Wikipedia ist "ſ" eine typografische Variante von "s", hat also nur eine andere schriftliche Erscheinungsform, aber keine andere Aussprache. Weiter unten im Artikel gibt es allerdings Hinweise, wie "ſ" manche Doppeldeutigkeiten in der Schriftform von Komposita (und damit einhergehend auch unterschiedliche Aussprachen gleich geschriebener Wörter) ...


10

"Er" is pronounced like the English word air and "Ihr" is pronounced like the English word ear. If the recorded voice does pronounce it wrong, I don't know how to help you. Do you also have these texts in a book, so you can follow the text while hearing?


10

The IPA would be [ˈblɔk(ˌ)ɛlʲtəstə]. Primary stress on the first syllable, with the second syllable optionally taking secondary stress. In fact, as a general rule, in compounds it is the first element (or root) that gets the primary stress. See for yourself: Auto­bahn, Wohnungs­tür, Herbst­wetter, Kontroll­fluß­graph, etc. More notable ...


10

It is a bit confusing. Originally, the verb is gucken, pronounced with a g as is to be expected from the spelling. However, in northern German dialects, there is an unrelated verb kieken with about the same meaning (to look), giving rise to a hybrid kucken. This, in turn, has expanded quite a bit southward, even into regions where kieken is completely absent ...


10

No, they aren't. The former is ʀɔk, the latter [ʀʊk] (compare the dirkausob's recording there in dict.cc).


10

Zwar gibt es keine verbindliche einheitliche Ausspracheregelung für die deutsche Sprache, dennoch gab es und gibt es Versuche einer Normierungen: Bühnensprache nach Siebs Völlig auf die Bedürfnisse einer Theaterbühne ausgerichtet, wurde versucht, die Aussprache der Schauspieler auf den deutschen Theaterbühnen Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts zu normieren. Diese ...



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