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14

It's actually nix It's slang for nichts, as you have guessed. I'd love to say something more but, first, I'd like to understand what is "good to use" (obviously, don't write nix it in a formal context!), and, secondly, I'm not an expert. Whence I'm pretty sure somebody will illuminate us with a better answer.


9

Nix is, as was already pointed out, a colloquial, informal, shorter form of nichts. Nix does not derive from any specific dialect; rather it is present in one form or another in most dialects. There are rare exceptions like the Berlin dialect prefering nüscht It is okay to use in very informal writings, like text messages to friends or in a chat etc. Do ...


7

The pronunciation you heard for both Dostojewski and Gouda are the ones every German would reproduce. I would blame school subjects, mostly. While everyone gets taught English and many people French, which also means that there is a critical mass of speakers of those languages that everyone will have heard the correct pronunciation, Russian and Dutch are ...


5

Ich hoffe, dass es in Ordnung ist wenn ich auf Deutsch antworte. Es ist meine Muttersprache, und darin kann ich mich besser ausdrücken als auf Englisch. Auf Anfrage übersetzte ich meine Antwort jedoch auch gerne ins Englische. Die Beobachtung, dass Deutschsprachige generell dazu tendieren, Wörter bestimmter Sprachen (Englisch, Französisch) wie in der ...


2

I think, the answer really neither depends on how well a certain language is spoken in Germany nor the educational level. I rather think, it depends on the assumption, which languages should be spoken correctly with a high level of education. English, French, Latin and old Greek all once were lingua franca in Europe. They are the general compass of old/new ...


1

The Hessian, Palatinate and Rhine-Hessian regions of Germany actually do not use [ʃ] but rather [ʒ] for many ch sounds after front vowels. And the pronounciation in Bavaria is often [mɪlx] – they use the [x] sound a lot more often than the more Northern Germans.


1

My dialect usually stresses the i properly so you can distinguish it from an e. This is very much not true for at least one other dialect, where i and e even sound similar to me. I had a guy from the outskirts of Berlin spell a name for me on Skype. I heard Bick while it was actually Beck. I then asked my colleague also from the outskirts of Berlin to spell ...


1

Mainly what other people have said. However there is also the variant [iʒ], heard in the Rhine-Hessian region (Mainz, Alzey and others). What was said about Berg does apply. The Rhine-Hessian region also pronounces that one as [bɛʒ] (the r almost unheard, the g turned into a French j). People from Hamburg often call their town [hamburç]. And some accents ...



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