Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

I tried to find dictionaries with pronunciation hints on Google Books, so that we can have references here to discuss about. Here are my findings. They all claim angeblich to be pronounced on the first syllable (which might surprise some commentors of your question): PONS Großwörterbuch Englisch: Englisch-Deutsch / Deutsch-Englisch, page 1327 Deutsches ...


4

Your examples are directly derived from ancient greek, where the corresponding letter Ξ was pronounced the same way and still is in modern Greek, if I may trust wikipedia. X is always pronounced /ks/ in German, no matter, where in the word, the x- special case directly linked to alphabet enumeration. You did not mention, why you mistrust the dictionaries, ...


4

Go to http://www.aussprache.at and enter at »Orthographische Suche« the word whose pronunciation you want to know. When you enter »angeblich« you will find that the six speakers (female and male voice from Austria, Germany and Switzerland) always stress the fist syllable and sometimes also the second (male voice from Austria). In the case of »ausführlich« ...


3

A very good tool is provided by http://www.aussprache.at In the Window "Suche" you can search for a word (example: search for »Chemie«). The findings are shown in the window above (for »Chemie« you find »Alchemie«, »Biochemie«, »Chemie« and »Chemielaborant«). Click on one of those findings. Left of this window you find the pronunciation written in ...


3

I do not think that the 'ks' sound is perceived as difficult by German speakers. Remember that we also have lots of 'ts' (represented by 'z') and 'pf' sounds. (There is however an Appel/Apfel dialect line.)


3

In English, t and r are both produced with the tip of the tongue, but at slightly different positions. When the tongue glides back from the t position to the r position, you get something like a sh /ʃ/ in between. In German, r is either pronounced in the back of the mouth (with the uvula) or with the tip of the tongue, but in the latter case, the tongue is ...


2

You finally stated your actual motivation to ask this question, namely that your German teacher had pronounced a German word with the same tr-slurry, turning tragen into /tʃra:gən/. But languages, despite being related, have completely different ways of using sounds and wildly different expectations of which sounds and which sound differences are important ...


2

But: there are cases in German where stress changes the meaning: umfahren : to steer around (a car around an obstacle, e.g. a traffic jam) "Wir empfehlen, den Stau weiträumig zu umfahren." umfahren : to run over (an obstacle with a car, e.g. a sign post) Pass auf, du wirst das Schild noch umfahren! Edit: the fact of the matter is that in German, ...


2

Wenn es um Gesetze geht, muss man immer streng nach Staaten unterscheiden. (Manchmal sogar auch innerhalb eines Staates nach Ländern.) Deutschland Das ist das Land in dem der in Bremen geborene Mediävist, Mundartforscher, Volkskundler, Kirchenmusiker und Deutsch-Professor Theodor Siebs im Jahr 1898 gemeinsam mit wichtigen Theater-Vertretern (die wiederum ...


1

Be aware that the following is only an educated guess. Even ignoring the unconventional stress, lebendig is a peculiar word. It is the only German word formed this way¹, i.e., by appending ig to the present participle. Usually such adjectives are formed by appending an adjective ending to the basic stem (here, leb), as for example in lebhaft, wendig, ...


1

This one is good. Some words have several speakers with a map showing the region they are in. It even has Swiss German speakers and words for which few resources exist. This has helped me quite a bit since I live in Switzerland. Forvo


1

It also depends on whether you want to emphasize something. In standard pronunciation you maybe stress the first syllable and when you emphasize a word you stress another syllable. I think there are no rules for stressing, it’s feeling for the language.


1

dict.cc provides the pronunciation. You just have to click the audio some users have uploaded. It's not always available, since it's sometimes the computer who speaks (but as I hear, that's the case in the dictionary you linked).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible