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7

Alles was ich im allgemeinen Teil über österreichisches Deutsch sage, gilt sinngemäß auch für schweizerisches Deutsch (nicht zu verwechseln mit Schweizerdeutsch welches keine Hochsprache sondern ein Dialekt ist). Da ich im Osten Österreich lebe (geboren und aufgewachsen in Graz, seit 20 Jahren in Wien) kenne ich das schweizerische Deutsch aber zu wenig um es ...


5

I went to a German school in the U.S. so students would constantly flip flop between languages. I would say that in most cases people would revert to the pronunciation of whatever language they were currently speaking in. So for your example, if I was saying sorry in a German sentence, I would pronounce it like you described. I think in general the converse ...


5

I'm an Austrian physicist and I cringe every time I hear "Shwrodinger", "Ainsdine", "Goudel" and other names of people*. In German to English, eu, st, sch, ä, ö, ü, etc. get lost every time, but I've been adviced to do the same mispronunciations when talking with Americans, so they can follow you. Conversely, in both directions and in general, for social ...


4

Eine Sprachvarietät ist eine eigene vollwertige "Sprache in der Sprache". Einzelne Varietäten unterscheiden sich durch Unterschiede im Vokabular, aber durchaus auch in der Grammatik. Es sind in aller Regel Schriftsprachen mit fester Schreibweise. Klassische Beispiele sind eben Britisches und Amerikanisches (oder Kanadisches, Indisches etc.) Englisch: Alle ...


4

Ein Dialekt ist eine Spezialisierung (also ein Unterbegriff) der Sprachvarietät. Dementsprechend ist ein Dialekt eine Sprachvarietät, aber zum Beispiel auch die Jugendsprache, Fachsprachen oder, wie im genannten Zusammenhang, auch Österreichisches Deutsch. Dialekt: die ursprüngliche, landschaftlich verschiedene Redeweise einer Region im Gegensatz zur ...


4

While NiftyKitty95’s answer has a point that you might usually want take a look at what native speakers do, it does not take into account that English and German speakers treat loanwords differently: German speakers with sufficient knowledge and training of English pronunciation¹ will in my experience usually do the following: If a word has been borrowed ...


3

Well, unaware of the social effect of your choice, Wikionary entry for the German word sorry actually has both pronunciations: one that matches the English word: [ˈsɔri] a second one, that maybe reproduces the germanized word: [ˈzɔʀi]. The z-sound is as if the word would be actually read in German; the R-sound, like that in drei, as well. So, my guess ...


2

Generally there is no "correct" pronunciation for German, mainly because of so many regional variations. Nevertheless there are common pronunciations given for words in the various dictionaries: Universität - IPA notation: [ˌunivɛʁziˈtɛːt] Universität - LEO via linguatec Universität - Wiktionary Universität - Pons Still, these pronunciation vary ...


1

I would not think much about the pronunciation of "sorry" in German. It is an English word and you can pronounce it in the way you are used to. The difference in pronunciation is minimal, when Germans pronounce the English word correctly. And most Germans speak English or have learnt it at school. If some German pronounces the word in a different way, he ...


1

There are a lot of German dictionaries online with audio facility where you can hear the sound. The ch-sound after the vowel a is different from the ch-sound after i. I simply call the first ch "Bach-sound. When you pronounce the German word Bach the mouth opening is wide for the vowel a. When you pronounce the ch-sound you keep this wide mouth opening and ...



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