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10

"Horicontal" is not a German word. Nor does it match any German spelling pattern, not even an imported one. The standard pronunciation for the combination "co" is "ko" as in for example "Co-Sponsor". So "horicontal" would be pronounced "horikontal". Might well be that back a hundred years ago (or more) some scholars would write it with a "c" because they ...


8

The @ sign is typically pronounced as an English at. For the dot, you either say Punkt or nothing at all, if it is clear where the segments start. Regarding other special characters, the underscore is called Unterstrich and the hyphen Bindestrich or just Strich. (Sometimes Minuszeichen or Minus is used, i.e. minus sign, though I fail to see a good reason for ...


4

The first e in "leben", "stehen" and "sehr" is a long e and thus pronounced like the "a" in "late" without the "-y" sound. The e in "pet" is a short e that you can find in the last e of "leben" and "stehen". In no case an "e" is pronounced like "i" in "Licht". In particular, "leben" and "lieben" are pronounced differently. There's normally no danger to ...


1

The e in Leben is long, so it is quite different from the e in pet, which, if my understanding of English pronunciation is correct, is more like the short ä in hätte. The German long e is also different from the German long i as in Lieben. For a German there is no danger of confusing them. If your native language does not have both of these or does not ...


1

The idea that German speakers try to pronounce words of foreign origin like the original seems to me essentially incorrect. It does not even work like that with a closely-related language like Swedish. You can bet that a German speaker would get all the following Swedish words and names wrongly pronounced: Gösta gylden Wilander Kerstin själ Göteborg kedja. ...


1

Emanuel's answer is correct. (Only the speculation in the last sentence is unfounded.) But that leaves the question why some German speakers would make this mistake. I think I can explain that. It seems to me that this is an obvious example of a hypercorrection. In German, words of Latin origin eventually get c replaced by either z (before e and i) or k ...



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