Hot answers tagged

3

As you correctly say, both [​ɪ] and [e] are more open than [i]. However, [e] is even more open (so the order, starting from the most open, is [i] – [​ɪ] – [e]), and there is another difference: While [i] and [e] are both front vowels, [​ɪ] is produced a bit further back (“near-front”). You can best compare the different positions of all vowels on a vowel ...


3

Yes it is entirely possible to substitute the shwa-n combination with a vocalic n. Wrzlprmft wrote an answer on the topic stressing a different point and to an unrelated question (and in German). The bottom line is that the difference between shwa-consonant and just the consonant is not phonemic in German and they are not allophones, so nobody will really ...


1

Just from my personal observation as a native speaker, both the version with a schwa and with no vowel are possible. If you want to clearly pronounce the d then it is natural have a vowel after it. Bavarians usually are easily recognized by their vowels, even if they otherwise speak Hochdeutsch. I cannot give details, though. I think that I do indeed ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible