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In Standard German, a phenomenon called terminal devoicing (Auslautverhärtung in German) effects the pronunciation word-final (or more generally: morpheme-final) consonants. It leads to the merging of the phoneme pairs b–p, d–t, w–f, g–k and /z/–/s/ (a phoneme pair not reflected in orthography). These are typically pronounced as if the unvoiced letter were ...


2

They both end with the same /t/ sound, that's true. However, to my perception, Rat tends to be pronounced with a significantly longer a than Rad. So basically Rad /ʁat/ Rat /ʁa:t/ This is at least the case in more western standard German (Rhine/Ruhr) in compounds like Stadtrat /'ʃtatʁa:t/ vs Fahrrad /'faʁat/. The longer a-sound has the effect that the t-...



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