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37

s and ch are spoken separately, if (and almost only if, see below) they are meeting due to some sort of word composition. The diminutive forms you give are examples for this: For instance, in Höschen is a composite of the “umlauted” stem of Hose, i.e., Hös-, and the diminutive suffix -chen. Something similar can happen with regular word composition, like in ...


15

Both words are pronounced the same (in standard German): [ˈzaɪ̯tn̩], singular [ˈzaɪ̯tə]; source: Duden-Aussprachewörterbuch (3rd ed., 1990). German orthography has a tendency to separate homophones wherever possible; similar cases are Leib/Laib, Lärche/Lerche.


13

I never heard Germans (including myself) pronounce it other than eye-tee. I also think that this is the correct way to pronounce it since Information Technology is an English term and therefore should be pronounced English, not German. However if IT would refer to Informationstechnologie it is a German word and should be pronounced German. Though ...


10

No, they aren't. The former is ʀɔk, the latter [ʀʊk] (compare the dirkausob's recording there in dict.cc).


10

It is a bit confusing. Originally, the verb is gucken, pronounced with a g as is to be expected from the spelling. However, in northern German dialects, there is an unrelated verb kieken with about the same meaning (to look), giving rise to a hybrid kucken. This, in turn, has expanded quite a bit southward, even into regions where kieken is completely absent ...


10

Zwar gibt es keine verbindliche einheitliche Ausspracheregelung für die deutsche Sprache, dennoch gab es und gibt es Versuche einer Normierungen: Bühnensprache nach Siebs Völlig auf die Bedürfnisse einer Theaterbühne ausgerichtet, wurde versucht, die Aussprache der Schauspieler auf den deutschen Theaterbühnen Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts zu normieren. Diese ...


8

Wenn ein s im Auslaut stimmlos gesprochen wird, liegt dies an der Auslautverhärtung des Deutschen, die auch dazu führt, dass andere Konsonanten im Auslaut härter ausgesprochen werden – so endet z. B. die Aussprache von Wald genauso wie die von Halt. Wenn nun Begungsformen oder andere Ableitungen eines Wortes existieren, in denen der entsprechende Konsonant ...


8

Alles was ich im allgemeinen Teil über österreichisches Deutsch sage, gilt sinngemäß auch für schweizerisches Deutsch (nicht zu verwechseln mit Schweizerdeutsch welches keine Hochsprache sondern ein Dialekt ist). Da ich im Osten Österreich lebe (geboren und aufgewachsen in Graz, seit 20 Jahren in Wien) kenne ich das schweizerische Deutsch aber zu wenig um es ...


8

The URL is: ha te te pe Doppelpunkt Slash Slash german Punkt stackexchange Punkt com Slash question Slash ask Some people say »Schrägstrich« instead of »Slash«. The software version: Windows acht Punkt eins


7

You would omit the zeros. Heute Abend essen wir erst um zwanzig Uhr.


6

Pronunciation is regionally different in Germany. In Swabia this example is pronounced like follows: Saite [aɪ̯] or [ɔɪ̯] as in "Saitewürstle" Seite [ɛɪ̯] as in "Gang uff'd Seite, I mecht vorbei", or "Seitenbacher" Note however that this is inconsistent. Depending on the word, the Swabian pronunciation of "ei" may be [aɪ̯], [ɔɪ̯] or [ɛɪ̯]. The ...


6

In German standard pronunciation, there are contrasting /s/ and /z/ phonemes; for instance, Busen [ˈbuːzn̩] and Bußen [ˈbuːsn̩] differ only in the voicedness of the s (a so-called minimal pair). This difference is, however, neutralized both at the start and at the end of words: At the start of words, only a voiced [z] may appear; at the end of words, only a ...


6

I'm an Austrian physicist and I cringe every time I hear "Shwrodinger", "Ainsdine", "Goudel" and other names of people*. In German to English, eu, st, sch, ä, ö, ü, etc. get lost every time, but I've been adviced to do the same mispronunciations when talking with Americans, so they can follow you. Conversely, in both directions and in general, for social ...


5

To add some IPA to this discussion: You would usually transcribe the r in that position (after unstressed e at the end of syllable[1] or word) together with the e as either [əʁ] or [ɐ] The first one is with a voiced uvular fricative[2], but it is barely audible, not as strongly pronounced as in French. The second version is what you'll more often ...


5

You must have a fine ear to notice that. Generally, the word sind is always pronounced with a voiced "s". However, the second example puts the word Autos in front of it. A word that ends with an unvoiced "s". So technically we'd have the following transition. s-z-i To do that we need to do two things... "set on" the vocal chords and form an "i". In ...


5

Für die Aussprache bzw. Schreibung von Eigennamen (nicht nur Ortsnamen, sondern beispielsweise auch Familiennamen) gibt es keine festen Regeln. Die Schreibweisen sind zu sehr unterschiedlichen Zeiten fixiert worden, größtenteils vor der Normierung der deutschen Rechtschreibung, und unterlagen den Moden der jeweiligen Zeit; Beispiele für solche Moden wären ...


5

I went to a German school in the U.S. so students would constantly flip flop between languages. I would say that in most cases people would revert to the pronunciation of whatever language they were currently speaking in. So for your example, if I was saying sorry in a German sentence, I would pronounce it like you described. I think in general the converse ...


4

The English ee, as in speech, is the same sound as the German I [iː]. There is no exact equivalent to German E [eː] in the standard varieties of English (Received Pronunciation, General American). The difference in pronunciation is the degree to which the jaw is opened; [e] is less open than [i]. The position of the tongue is the same for both vowels ...


4

In some dialects or in colloquial German there are cases when er has different pronounciations, but not in "high German". There's actually no rule for that and you are fine pronouncing er as /eːɐ/ all the time. One case where er could be pronounced differently is the following A: Hat er das wirklich gesagt?? B: Ja, hat er. In both cases, hat er ...


4

I think you might be reading (sorry, hearing) too much into this. As an (admittedly, Austrian) native speaker, "Heer" and "hehr" are perfect homophones. There should also be no [i:] in any of the other words you mention.


4

Die Schreibung von Schmied mit ie geht wohl laut Grimms Wörterbuch auf den Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts zurück: "... die ursprüngliche kürze des stammvocals von schmied erscheint im früheren nhd. durchgehends gewahrt. Maaler 358a, Hulsius 286b, Schottel 1404, Stieler 1879 und Wachter 1443 bieten schmid, Frisch 2, 208a daneben auch schmied, das er für die ...


4

German and French differ in their phoneme inventories. In particular the French nasal vowel variants (as in sang, en, quinze, bon or brun) are missing in German¹ and they are not part of the native speaker’s sound inventory. Thus the “correct” pronunciation is the original French one, but German native speakers may only be able to vocalize these sounds to a ...


4

Ein Dialekt ist eine Spezialisierung (also ein Unterbegriff) der Sprachvarietät. Dementsprechend ist ein Dialekt eine Sprachvarietät, aber zum Beispiel auch die Jugendsprache, Fachsprachen oder, wie im genannten Zusammenhang, auch Österreichisches Deutsch. Dialekt: die ursprüngliche, landschaftlich verschiedene Redeweise einer Region im Gegensatz zur ...


4

Eine Sprachvarietät ist eine eigene vollwertige "Sprache in der Sprache". Einzelne Varietäten unterscheiden sich durch Unterschiede im Vokabular, aber durchaus auch in der Grammatik. Es sind in aller Regel Schriftsprachen mit fester Schreibweise. Klassische Beispiele sind eben Britisches und Amerikanisches (oder Kanadisches, Indisches etc.) Englisch: Alle ...


4

While NiftyKitty95’s answer has a point that you might usually want take a look at what native speakers do, it does not take into account that English and German speakers treat loanwords differently: German speakers with sufficient knowledge and training of English pronunciation¹ will in my experience usually do the following: If a word has been borrowed ...


4

Wer meine Antwort zu lang findet, darf gerne zum Abschnitt »Zusammenfassung« hinunterscrollen. Plurizentrische Sprachen Es gibt derzeit ungefähr 5000 verschiedene lebende Sprachen. Davon haben etwas mehr als 30 Sprachen einen ganz besonderen Status. Sie sind plurizentrisch. Das heißt, dass es mindestens zwei geografische Gebiete gibt, in denen die dort ...


3

I doubt there is a general answer for this question. I'd say like in French, but still with a different pronunciation. Whereat a French would pronounce it not like a German. But if someone knows French, that might be again a different situation. So it might depend on the speaker. For instance leo.de gives Chance and Engagement (close to French) but ...


3

Again I'm on my quest to add some IPA to this site: How Bruder is pronounced was explained here, so I'm not going to repeat that. Now for mehr. In IPA you would write: [ˈmeːɐ] The difference is that in this case, we have a stressed e and not a schwa [ə] as in Bruder. [eː] is a vowel that is produced in the front part of the mouth, whereas [ə] is in ...


3

Not really sure how the 'r' is pronounced in french, but the 'er' in 'Ver-' is exactly pronounced the same as the 'er' in 'Bruder'.


3

If an -r is the final letter of a word, the it is usually pronounced similar to an short "a". Mehr is no exception to that. Mutt(e)a, Brud(e)a, Wint(e)a, meea, voa, Uua.. The proper IPA symbol is different.



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