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20

For those notes that are a letter of the alphabet, e.g. C, A, E, H, B (yes, that one, too) they are pronounced as the letter itself would be. Note, that English B is called H in German and English B flat is German B. A sharp is rendered as the syllable -is added to the letter name. So C♯, D♯, E♯ would be cis, dis, eis. Note that eis is pronounced e-is, not ...


14

If the original form of the name was Ruhle without an umlaut, its German pronunciation would be very similar to the word ruler in non-rhotic accents of English (which include Australian English), i.e. with two syllables, unlike rule. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), the pronunciation would be represented as [ˈruːlə]. If, on the other hand, it ...


13

Wir sind eine zutiefst literale Gesellschaft. Praktisch alles, was wir über Sprache zu wissen glauben, basiert auf ihrer Verschriftung. Darum ist der naive Ansatz, den die meisten Deutschsprechenden verfolgen werden, wenn man sie bittet, ein Wort rückwärts zu sprechen, der buchstabenzentrierte. Da die meisten in der 1. Klasse einige Buchstabenkombinationen ...


13

Yes, there are: Weg [veːk], weg [vɛk]. It is, however, not the capitalization itself that affects pronunciation; it just so happens that one of the words is a noun and therefore capitalized.


11

"Horicontal" is not a German word. Nor does it match any German spelling pattern, not even an imported one. The standard pronunciation for the combination "co" is "ko" as in for example "Co-Sponsor". So "horicontal" would be pronounced "horikontal". Might well be that back a hundred years ago (or more) some scholars would write it with a "c" because they ...


11

The German sequence of the basic notes (white keys on piano) is: C, D, E, F, G, A, H. The system is simple. There is no »flat« or »sharp«, just the suffixes »-es« and »-is«. And you have to keep in mind, that the German name of the English B is H. There are five exceptions, they are written in boldface. I will not talk about enharmonic, I guess you know ...


11

The article in the English Wikipedia gives two similar pronunciations /ˈɔɪlər/ (Swiss) and /ˈɔʏlɐ/ (German). I agree with them. The article even has a footnote that explains with references that English-style /ˈjuːlər/ is considered wrong, but it certainly isn’t uncommon. Unlike the variant Lennart or English Leonard, his given name Leonhard is pronounced ...


11

There is no difference in pronunciation (not in Hochdeutsch at least), and you don't need to differentiate them, since grammar orders them. That is: das dass (✗) is forbidden by grammar rules. In particular, dass requires a punctuation sign, in fact: das, dass das. Dass das; dass are possible.


9

The @ sign is typically pronounced as an English at. For the dot, you either say Punkt or nothing at all, if it is clear where the segments start. Regarding other special characters, the underscore is called Unterstrich and the hyphen Bindestrich or just Strich. (Sometimes Minuszeichen or Minus is used, i.e. minus sign, though I fail to see a good reason for ...


7

I think that passage from your textbook is neither very clear nor very complete. In German the letter r is usually pronounced with a guttural sound when it is at the beginning of a word: Raum immediately after a consonant: frisch at the beginning of a syllable: abräumen In all other cases, the r is pronounced more like ah or a schwa: warten, Finger, nur, ...


7

No, säen and sehen are distinct in many dialects. The vowel in both verbs is long. Long e is rendered as [e:] while long ä is rendered as [ɛ:] in many dialects thus providing a clear distinction. You would have been correct if the verbs had short vowels. Short, stressed e is pronunced [ɛ], exactly like short, stressed ä. Furthermore, sehen is an irregular ...


7

The prerequisite for this answer is knowing how to pronounce er and sehen (which you might hear in the very first lesson of a German course). The IPA signs for the words you asked for are: for eh, [eː] long e as the [eː] in sehen for ehe (or Ehe, which is not the same), [ˈeːə]. I.e. the same long e as above and then the second e of sehen. for ...


7

As you correctly say, both [​ɪ] and [e] are more open than [i]. However, [e] is even more open (so the order, starting from the least open, is [i] – [​ɪ] – [e]), and there is another difference: While [i] and [e] are both front vowels, [​ɪ] is produced a bit further back (“near-front”). You can best compare the different positions of all vowels on a vowel ...


6

The names Rühle/Ruehle do seem to be a bit more common in Germany than Ruhle. On the other hand, if your ancestors spelled their surname Ruehle there was no reason to change it, and if they spelled it Rühle they would most likely have transcribed this as Ruehle right upon entering the country. (PS: But as hobbs pointed out in a comment, it’s quite possible ...


6

No, they are pronounced differently. The reason, though, is not the "h", but the fact that "ä" and "e" are pronounced differently, although casually spoken language, especially regional accents or even dialects, may make them sound similar or even identical. The "official" pronounciations, though, are distinct. [EDIT] after the clarifications ...


5

The classical book concerning this topic is Der kleine Hey, which is also used by professional singers. As I just learned, there is also an edition with an enclosed DVD (ISBN 9783795707026), which gives an impression, how the mouth should look like etc.


5

Yes, they would. iShelf is pronounced [aɪʃɛlf] and iSelf is pronounced [aɪsɛlf]. The differing sounds [ʃ] and [s] are both part of the German phoneme repertoire and distinguishing them is essential to understand the German language. For example, the German words Busch ([bʊʃ]) and Bus ([bʊs]) or Sex ([sɛks]) and Schecks ([ʃɛks]) only differ by that sound. ...


5

Except from the example "Weg" there is no common such pair. However, capitalising things works as an emphasizer, and that does affect pronunciation somewhat; it might be slower, more majestic, etc. Douglas Adams, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency: The door was the way to... to... The Door was The Way. Good. Capital letters were always the best ...


4

First of all: In German each vowel has a short and a long version, and it can be spoken closed and open, which produces different spoken sounds for the same written letter. (»Mond« and »Tonne« are written with the same letter o, but the pronunciation is not exactly the same; There are at least four different pronunciation for the letter e) Compared with ...


4

I have thought about how I can answer you without speaking, so I have searched for a few videos in which you can find your answer. Ehe (1:35 Min): https://youtu.be/1p2cTwcqt_M Eh: Like "Ehe", without the last syllable. Eher (1:30) https://youtu.be/JcmDlftUzck


4

Diese Frage hat mich auch schon beschäftigt. Bevor ich aber zu meiner »damals« gefundenen Antwort übergehe, werfen wir einen kurzen Blick auf Wiktionary: Dort werden direkt hintereinander die beiden Aussprachen U-kra-i-ne und U-krai-ne genannt, und die entsprechenden Wortreime als -ine und -eine gegeben. Beim Duden gehen sie sogar einen Schritt weiter, und ...


4

Phonetisch¹ ist der Unterschied zwischen [ˈhɛkl̩] und [ˈhɛkəl] minimal und es gibt einen fließenden Übergang, da [k] als Plosiv natürlicherweise ein Ausatmen, also zumindest ein leichtes Schwa nach sich zieht. Der Unterschied zwischen [ˈhɛkl̩] und [ˈhɛkəl] liegt also darin, ob nur ein minimales Schwa oder mehr vorliegt. Die reale Aussprache ist nah am ...


4

Yes it is entirely possible to substitute the shwa-n combination with a vocalic n. Wrzlprmft wrote an answer on the topic stressing a different point and to an unrelated question (and in German). The bottom line is that the difference between shwa-consonant and just the consonant is not phonemic in German and they are not allophones, so nobody will really ...


4

Im Deutschen ist formal [ɡluˈteːn] korrekt, da ist m.E. Deiner Recherche nichts hinzuzufügen, aber da die englische Aussprache eben [ˈɡluːtn̩] ist, scheint sich hier per verstecktem Anglizismus diese Aussprache einzuschleichen. Satire Zu unterscheiden ist vielleicht auch – mal ganz zynisch unterstellt – zwischen den Menschen, die an Zöliakie leiden und ...


3

The four are actually pretty discernable once you know what you need to do. We have two variants that end in er and we have two that don’t. And we also have three variants that have an additional eh in the beginning and one that doesn’t. We can consider the cases independently: eh at the beginning means that a long [e:] is added. er at the end is ...


3

Sehr passend zu diesem Thema gibt es den Wikipedia-Artikel Namen auf -ow. Vereinfacht gesagt, sieht die Lage ungefähr so aus: Im Mittelalter hatten viele Orte am Wasser Namen germanischen Ursprungs, die auf -ow oder -owe endeten. Diese Endung ist mit den Wörtern Au und letztlich auch aqua verwandt und wurde im Rahmen des Lautwandels meist zu -au. Viele ...


3

The first e in "leben", "stehen" and "sehr" is a long e and thus pronounced like the "a" in "late" without the "-y" sound. The e in "pet" is a short e that you can find in the last e of "leben" and "stehen". In no case an "e" is pronounced like "i" in "Licht". In particular, "leben" and "lieben" are pronounced differently. There's normally no danger to ...


3

Reading will help to improve your reading skills. Reading means: Consume language that others have produced without being able to hear it. Of all the possibilities to interact with a new language, reading is the most useless way to practice speaking skills. When you write in German (and get your writings corrected by someone who speaks German), you will be ...


3

The thing about the perception of accents is that it is extremely opinion based. Some people love French accents, some people hate them, much the same way as some dialects are loved by some and hated by others. It is safe to say that everybody will have a personal opinion on how British (or American or Australian/others, although these last ones are ...


3

Pronouncing "chs" as "ks" is just a simplification that has been made official over the original /çs/ and /xs/ pronounciation, akin to pronouncing -ig as /iç/ instead of /ik/ for the Auslautverhärtung (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final-obstruent_devoicing#German) or /ik~g/ as fortis and lenis (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortis_and_lenis) The ...



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