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14

First of all, something regarding the adaption of place names in general: We only use adapted names for places that have been of historical importance to Germany – at least I do not know of any place name that has been adapted into German recently. In particular I do not know of any street whose name has been adapted. This rule does however not necessarily ...


10

Street Names are unambiguous, they are not to be translated. If you ask because you want to ship a package or a letter by post, you need to know this. Otherwise your shipment can not be delivered.


4

I agree with the other posters, do not translate street names. Also, compass directions in street names are probably much more frequent in the US, where streets are arranged in a grid with some kind of center, and house numbers are counted from the center, so "1 south gee street" would be next to "1 north gee street". German cities generally don't have this ...


2

John ist gelangweilt and John friert (dialectal: John friert es) are better, unambiguous alternatives to John ist langweilig (‘boring’ ./. ‘bored’) and John ist kalt (‘cold’ ./. ‘freezing’). Some dialects, e.g. Ripuarian, allow articles before certain kinds of proper names, as in dem John ist langweilig and dem John ist kalt. Elsewhere, this sounds very ...


2

But what if the nouns in question are proper nouns / nouns without articles (which don't have any case markers)? How would it look then? Do you mean something like Peter ist langweilig? Yes, this is ambiguous, meaning you'll have to decide from context whether Peter is bored or boring. Also, how does German solve such problems in the general case? ...


2

To add to Roberts answer, the suffix -s is only omitted on names if the name is after an article ("des", "eines"). If the order is changed so that the article gets left out, then also names have to have the suffix -s. (If the name is ending on an s or a similar sound like -sch, instead of the -s an apostrophe is added) Examples: das Werk Angelus ...


1

Your first examples are all names, and they remain unchanged. With other nouns, you need to use the Genitive case; for example "Jäger des verlorenen Schatzes", "Herr des Hauses", "Regisseur des Films", or "bester Schauspieler des Theaters". Other terms like "Meister der Musik" or "Chef der Behörde" or "Verwalter der Finanzen" remain without Genitive-S ...


1

John ist langweilig seems to be used differently. I've never encountered that sentence with the meaning of "He's bored", but only in the sense of "He's boring". In other German-speaking parts, however, it seems to be valid to mean both; particularly in regions where they also use the word fad, meaning langweilig. So we're talking about Southern Germany and ...



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