Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Both are reflexive verbs that can also be used in a non-reflexive way. Reflexive verbs are more common in German than in English (like "enjoy yourself"). "Ich bin mir sicher" works with or without the "mir", but "Ich kann mir vorstellen" does not, because the reflexive version "sich (etwas) vorstellen" (=> imagine something) has a different meaning than ...


12

Verlassen is an adjective here. The predicate is vorkommen. The closest translation keeping the structure of the sentence is Lars seemed endlessly deserted to himself. while in an English text you would probably just say Lars felt endlessly deserted. Vorkommen is not necessarily reflexive, it can be used in this sense with any kind of indirect ...


7

The verb konzentrieren is usually used reflexively: Ich konzentriere mich (auf etwas) Du konzentrierst dich ... Er konzentriert sich ... Also in your case, the conference is concentrating on something: Die Konferenz konzentriert sich auf die globale Erwärmung. On a side note, konzentrieren is usually reserved for humans, so I would suggest using ...


7

"sich" can often be translated to "himself/herself/itself, themselves" (*) or "each other", which covers all but one of your examples: Eine Klasse für sich. -> A class of its own (or, literally, by itself). Frauen unter sich. -> Women among themselves. Deutschland schafft sich ab. -> Germany abolishes itself. Your first example is a different ...


7

Im übertragenen Sinne wird jemand durch das Lachen getötet. Da dieser jemand immer der Lachende selbst ist, tötet er sich selbst. Er lacht sich also tot. Analog für "kaputt"; hier eine Gegenprobe: Sie lacht tot. / Er lacht den Postboten kaputt.


7

If the question refers to the use of the verb, particularly how to put the reflexive: Es ist schwer, sich vorzustellen, dass er nur 20 Jahre alt ist. Otherwise, see collapsar's answer.


7

I personally would not consider this saying to be rude. Most of the times, using "dir" in this case is leading to a more specific result. For example: Mach die Jacke zu. (Close the jacket) This could basically mean that someone is supposed to close any jacket. It could even be one that he is not even wearing. It just says that someone should close a ...


7

Your example "Wohin soll ich das Baby setzen" is fine. "Wo soll ich mich setzen?" is a bit odd, usually you say "Wo soll ich mich HINsetzen?" This contains your wohin - but it is split up. The "hin" is moved to the verb. I think you can say "Wohin" is used when the verb expresses some kind of movement while "Wo" is used to ask for the current ...


7

Feelings/emotions are expressed here with the Dativ (mir ist), not with Nominativ (ich bin). You could argue, that this is done for differentiation purposes, because (as Matthias mentioned) "Mir ist übel" and "Ich bin übel" mean different things. But that does not explain other uses like: Mir ist, als hätte es geklopft. (I think someone knocked at the ...


7

At this time of the year an old Christmas carol from 1480 comes to my mind where "träumen" was used reflexive (i.e. "unecht reflexiv" or rather reciprocal): Und unsrer lieben Frauen der traumete ein Traum: als unter ihrem Herzen gewachsen ward ein Baum. In modern German it is only rarely used reflexive, here are a few examples: Mir ...


6

In this sentence, verlassen is a participle, "left alone". sich vorkommen can be translated as "feel like".


6

In the given context, you'd rather use glauben instead of vorstellen: Ich kann es kaum glauben / Es ist kaum zu glauben, daß er nur/erst 20 Jahre alt ist Using an adjective, an alternate phrasing is possible: Es ist schwer/kaum vorstellbar, daß er nur/erst 20 Jahre alt ist.


5

Sie können reflexiv sein, weil sich das Lachen bzw. der Grund des Lachens auch auf den Lachenden selber beziehen kann. Hingegen bezeichnet das Verb „lachen“ allein nur die „Aktivität“ selber, ohne zugleich eine „Richtung“ des Lachens, seinen Grund oder seine Intention anzugeben. Man muss aber aufpassen: Komposita mit „lachen“ können reflexiv sein, müssen ...


5

This page lists the rules in more detail, and with examples. You should find most of your answers there. (EDIT) Excerpts pertaining to the question: Today, the reflexive pronoun is usually pulled as far to the beginning as possible. In the main clause, the reflexive pronoun is usually placed directly behind the conjugated verb: "Der Professor ärgert ...


4

Having a quick look at the link TvF posted, another good reference came to my mind. On belleslettres.eu, there's a good article (in German, including video) on where to place a reflexive pronoun. The most essential information are already given in the other answers. The reflexive pronoun is usually placed behind the verb. This is valid for a simple ...


4

The word "mir" is in this case a reflexive pronoun. Em1 already stated that "übel" can have different meanings. Without a reflexive pronoun ("Ich bin übel") you would say that you are vicious (not very common). With a reflexive pronoun ("Mir ist übel") you say that you are feeling sick. I am not sure why a reflexive pronoun is used. Possibly to ...


4

The reflexive constructions you cite (sich finden, sich lesen) are used commonly in everyday speech in these contexts. Das Buch liest sich sehr schnell. is even more common than the passive alternative Das Buch kann schnell gelesen werden.. The reflexive construction you make up (sich schicken) just doesn't exist. The passive construction is to be used ...


3

Your sentences are fine. You're right that you have to repeat each sein and haben when you have an alternating use of those verbs. If you'd drop them the sentence not only sounds incomplete but also is grammatically incorrect. Whenever possible try to reduce word redundancy. When you can group parts of the sentence, then do it and leave out words which ...


3

Laut Wiktionaryeintrag ist selbst ein Demonstrativpronomen, dass als Apposition benutzt wird. selbst bezieht sich hier zwar auf das Subjekt der Autor. Es ist aber kein Rückbeziehung oder Teil des Verbs (reflexive Verben), sondern lediglich eine Verstärkung. selbst kann ohne grammatikalische Probleme und ohne Verlust der Kernaussage in dem Satz weggelassen ...


3

First of all, your German sample text does not end in a relative clause (as your translation does) but is a sequence of to main clauses. To make it a relative clause, it should read Ich habe für euch ein Tutorial gebastelt, das sich gewünscht wurde. But still, it sounds weird (and does so because the "no passive" rule applies). The only way to make it ...


3

A sentence that has sich in it is a Reflexivsatz. Sich is a "Reflexivpronomen", just like mir, mich, dir, dich... Off the top of my head, I agree with Anurag Kalia and his comment that, in a statement, the "Reflexivpronomen" belongs after the verb that follows the subject that the verb refers to. In a question, however, the "Reflexivpronomen" is after the ...


2

Heinrich Heine träumte es von einem Königskind: Mir träumte von einem Königskind Mir träumte von einem Königskind, Mit nassen, blassen Wangen; Wir saßen unter der grünen Lind', Und hielten uns liebumfangen. "Ich will nicht Deines Vaters Thron, Und nicht sein Zepter von Golde, Ich will nicht seine demantene Kron', ...


2

Die Konferenz "konzentriert sich" auf ... That is no German. That is a word-for-word translation of Englisch "focuses on". You can express the idea with: Hauptthema der Konferenz ist die Klimaerwärmung. Or: Die Konferenz beschäftigt sich hauptsächlich/vornehmlich/ausschließlich mit dem Thema Klimaerwärmung. Konzentrier dich! - That is what you say to a ...


2

The word "entscheiden" can be used with or without "sich". Both versions are correct, but have different meanings: Erfolg kann man nicht plannen, oft muss man spontan entscheiden. You can't plan success, you often must decide spontaneously. The decisions you meet directly concern other persons or other companies. It is you who makes the decisions, ...


2

Beide Verben sind zunächst im Gegensatz zu "lachen" telisch. Das heißt, sie haben ein "Ziel". Hier sind das die Adjektive/Präfixe. "Lachen" hat kein "ziel". Du machst es, und danach nicht. Das reicht aber noch nicht. Du kannst beide Verben abstrakt als "Produktionsverben" kategorisieren und das generische "machen" einsetzen. Solche Verben brauchen eigentlich ...


2

Version a) and b) are correct and they mean the same. Version b) might have a little more personal touch that a) which sounds a bit "businessy". Version b) is the only possible construction if you decide a "direct object" so Ich entscheide etwas. Also, if you decide something that concerns only others you cannot really use the "mich" version. That ...


2

Wo and Wohin can also be used to emphasize when repeating a question. Consider the following dialogue. Me : Wo soll ich mich setzen? Host : Dahinten Me : Wohin soll ich mich setzen? Host : Dahinten neben meiner Schwägerin.


1

That's how I'd order it. The ones from your list in bold. Wo darf ich mich setzen? very formal Wohin darf ich mich setzen? formal Wohin soll ich mich setzen? less formal Wo soll ich mich setzen? even less formal would not use that one personally Wo soll ich mich hinsetzen? informal Und wo soll ich mich hinsetzen? very informal


1

Da sowohl Ich setze mich auf den Stuhl am Tischende. (wohin?) als auch Ich setze mich am Tischende. (wo?) korrekte und sinnvolle Sätze sind, gilt dies auch für beide Fragen. In der Tat würde ich, wenn ich förmlich sein möchte, „Wo darf ich mich setzen?“ vorziehen, auch wenn ich mir nicht sicher bin, warum. Das mag daran liegen, dass hinsetzen ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible