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18

“Guten Tag” is the conventional alternative. It may sound a little formal but it’s really not. Personally I prefer a hearty “Hallo” (or “Moin” in the north) but this is generally not seen as very polite and should be avoided if you don’t know your interlocutor and don’t want to give offence. In particular, answering “Grüß Gott” with “Hallo” is certainly a ...


17

"Guten Morgen" (any time before noon) "Guten Tag" (any time between mid-morning and 6 pm) "Guten Abend" (any time after 6 pm) Times above are a rough estimate. People don't get huffed if you're a minute or two early/late (unlike in English speaking countries, where people feel a need to apologize if they use "good morning" at two minutes past noon). ...


17

Ich hoffe, es ist in Ordnung, wenn ich auf Deutsch antworte, denn es ist meine Muttersprache, und darin kann ich mich besser ausdrücken. Grüß Gott Ich bin ein Atheist und ich lebe in Wien. Ich mag den Gruß "Grüß Gott" auch nicht und das aus demselben Grund. Aber ich benutze den Gruß trotzdem, denn hier in Österreich denkt kaum jemand über den religiösen ...


16

The simple answer is: "Sie" is always appropriate unless you are addressing a child. However, there are a lot of situations where the "Du" is more common today; this includes most usages in forums, blogs or social networks, leading to the belief that it is accepted for general use. Some companies use it as a form of corporate identity. Ikea and Apple come ...


13

Wenn der Name des Ansprechpartners bekannt ist, dann Sehr geehrter Herr Meier oder Sehr geehrte Frau Meier Ist der Name nicht bekannt, dann Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren So formell das auch klingen mag, aber es ist die "normale", höfliche Anredeform für Schriftverkehr. Liebes Finanzamt wurde schon vor Jahren von der Liste der ...


13

In der langen Version würde man sagen: Pfüat di Gott was soviel heißt wie "Gott behüte Dich". In der originalen Reihenfolge (Kommentar teylyn) "Behüt Dich Gott", verkürzt zu B'hüt di Gott. Nachzulesen im Bayrischen Wörterbuch.


13

The salutation "Guten Tag" in written communication is a more informal variation of "Sehr geehrte/r....". Both essentially say the same thing, but "Sehr geehrte/r" has been the accepted way to formally address a person for I don't know how many decades. In my personal experience, "Guten Tag" has gained traction especially in industries that cultivate a ...


13

Several possibilities there: You can ask the child in a cutesy tone (Duzen), if it's a rather young child. The mother will probably smile from ear to ear and wait for the kid to answer, or eventually answer the question for her kid (or call the police for harassment ;) If the kid is your friend (similar age, same school, etc. etc.), you can just quickly ...


13

It's from Latin, servus meaning slave, servant. So when someone greets you, Servus! it meant originally "[I am your] servant" but it is nowadays only a friendly greeting, like "Hi!" in English. Think of old-fashioned sign-offs in English letter-writing: Your obdt. & humble servant You will hear "Servus!" much more often in southern ...


12

Summary: Books with the title "Frohes Schaffen" have been published by an Austrian social-democratic publisher of children's books since 1925, so a Nazi origin seems unlikely. It's still quite possible that they used and popularized that phrase later, though. There seems to be a book series that was published at least since 1925 with the title Frohes ...


11

In written, formal communication, it's never wrong to use it. If you use the name, you would usually abbreviate the title: Sehr geehrte Frau Prof. Maier, if you don't use the name, don't abbreviate: Sehr geehrte Frau Professor, In oral communication in Germany, it becomes more hazy, and is subject to many subtleties. It depends extremely on context and ...


11

As a Non-Bavarian with roots in Bavaria, my experience is such: As a Bavarian in Bavaria: That greeting is totally neutral with no notion of a religious attachment As a Non-Bavarian in Bavaria: Using "Grüß Gott" is the same as mentioned above, with a slight hint to respecting the culture. Using "Guten Tag" is a clear statement that you're not a local, but ...


11

This heavily depends on the workplace. There are a lot of offices where not a single word is uttered in the toilet, then there are others where lengthy conversations from stall to stall are common. Also, the relationship to your boss plays a role, obviously. So: When in doubt, keep silent. Repeat their greeting if there is any.


10

The least problematic variant for both, formality, and familiarity in a case, when you communicate with strangers but expect to have a somewhat closer relationship in the future would be adressing them with their last name, and use 'Liebe...' Examples: Liebe Beate Müller, lieber Hans Müller, Liebe Familie Müller,* Only in case they already had ...


9

Moin moin means Guten Morgen (good morning), literally Schönen Morgen (beautiful morning), from Low German. It's similar in Dutch and I think Frisian as well. Moin is short for Moin moin and means just Guten or Schönen and can therefore be used all day. In Northern Germany (well, Schleswig-Holstein at least) you'll encounter Moin moin all day as well ...


8

I don't know whether it originated from Nazi Propaganda, and honestly, I don't care. This never even crossed my mind. Even if it did, as you say, it seems to have lost all connotation. I don't think we should let evil people dictate what words to use and which ones to avoid; we should not let them monopolize harmless phrases like this one. Indeed, I think ...


8

Liebe Angela, lieber Peer, ... or Liebe Angela und lieber Peer, both sound perfect to me, if they both signed their last email with Angela und Peer. If you address both the parents and their children* (!), you can use Liebe Familie Müller, Only an official sender (like the tax office) would use Eheleute Müller and only in the ...


8

Grüezi ist in dem Sinne nicht modern, sondern einfach höflich und deshalb Standard wenn man eine unbekannte Person anspricht oder jemanden, mit dem man per Sie ist. Es handelt sich also um eine Höflichkeitsform. Wenn man mit jemandem per du ist (Freunde, Familie, Kollegen), wird oft mit einem der folgenden gegrüsst: Hoi Hallo Sali Salü Ciao Tschau ...


8

Zunächst einmal, korrekt ist: Sehr geehrte Dame, sehr geehrter Herr, ... Danach folgt (beginnend mit einem Kleinbuchstaben) der Text. Da eine Bewerbung meist an eine bestimmte Person geht, ist für mich die Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren Klausel etwas zu unpersönlich. Deshalb möchte ich die unbekannte Person direkt ansprechen. Das tust Du in ...


7

In my experience you usually use "Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren" to begin a correspondence, possibly when you're not entirely sure who is going to read/respond to it. As the correspondence continues, it may be adequate to switch to "Guten Tag", as it builds up some familiarity with the correspondant. It could easily be considered a little too formal to ...


7

You don't use Guten Tag in the evening or at night. ;) No, seriously, Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren is the way to go if you are writing a formal letter to someone you barely know. If you meet someone in person, you could say Guten Tag!.


7

There would be another alternative. Habe die Ehre It is an older but still used form in Austria. It can be used to say Hello and Good bye. Younger people often use a derived version to greet each other. Dere


7

Further north, you can also use Moin, or Moinmoin. It's fun to say, perfectly polite, quite common, and somewhat disarming.


7

I was taught a common phrase for this is “Es freut mich, Sie kennenzulernen”, often shortened to just “Es freut mich”.


7

I am from Bavaria and to be honest, I doubt that people today actually see a religious background in saying "Grüß Gott". It's just the way they greet each other. So a reply like "I will if I ever meet him" or "whom?" or "which one?" will mostly be frowned upon. Personally I think that this is even more rude than greeting an anti-religious person with "Grüß ...


7

Use the same greeting you would use otherwise, or none at all. (Perhaps not "Mahlzeit", I agree. Certainly not "Servus" unless you are "duzing" your boss.) Notwhing wrong with Grüß Gott, even in front of the stalls.


6

Kommt, wie schon gesagt, drauf an. Geschäftlich auf jeden Fall die erste oder zweite Variante benutzen. Nur so ist man definitiv auf der sicheren Seite. Für private Angelegenheiten muss man es der Situation anpassen. Eine E-Mail an den neuen Vermieter würde ich ebenfalls mit der, zwar sehr formalen aber dennoch sichereren, zweiten Variante ansprechen. ...


6

I generally discourage religious phrases, but "Grüß Gott" has really lost its religious meaning and is used by most atheists (with some exceptions, of course) because of the dominant geographical meaning. Note that you can get through the day with the acceptable "Guten Morgen!", "Mahlzeit!", "Schönen Abend!". but not everyone likes "Mahlzeit" because ...



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