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For my understanding as a German native speaker the mögen in Es mag paradox anmuten... has two purposes at the same time: It implies an uncertainty about the rest: Maybe it seems to be paradoxical to you but it need not seem paradoxical to everyone. It makes the whole phrase a concessive clause (Konzessivsatz/-konstruktion) as if a zwar was present (Zwar ...


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"mag" is a modal (mögen); it is ethymologically the same as "may", yet be careful, as both languages use it quite differently. I'll try a (somewhat free) translation: "As strange as it may seem in the face of current, brutal events: during the course of past milennia, Earth became a more peaceful place" Note that "may" must not be used to denote permission: ...


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It is a passive voice construction. Er bekommt die Frage gestellt Er bekommt ein Buch geschenkt The specific type of question (or the description of the book) can be inserted in different places. Er bekommt die Frage gestellt, wann ... Er bekommt die Frage, wann ..., gestellt. Er bekommt ein Buch geschenkt, in dem ... Er bekommt ein ...


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It's just regular passive voice: He gets asked a question.


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You should study the grammar chapter word order in German. But I admit that German word order is quite a hurdle for learners.


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I think I have two tips. One: What helped me most learning English and Dutch was to read literature. Anything German should be of some help to a learner, as long as you keep switching contexts to get as broad an overview as possible. Magazines, newspapers, prose, forums, advertisements... You'll eventually get a feeling for when which word order is made ...


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That's one of the most common mistakes English speakers make, so don't worry, you are not alone. :-) Unlike English, which has a fixed word order (SVO), German doesn't need a fixed order. Only the position of the verb(s) is fixed. But there's something like a neutral word order, and if you deviate from that word order, parts of the sentence get emphasized ...


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You’re right, “o.g.” means “obengenannte”, i.e. “abovementioned”. Full translation is The prospective tenant certifies that the abovementioned, previously unknown to him, rentable apartment, was pointed out to him by the broker, and that he has received complete data. “o.g.” is in the correct spot, as it refers to the entire phrase “ihm unbekannte ...


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You are right about the meaning of o. g.: It stands for obengenannte (or any inflected form) which translates as abovementioned. So the relevant segment of in your is: obengenannte ihm unbekannte vermietbare Wohnung. This is the noun Wohnung (appartment) which is described by three adjectives: obengenannte (abovementioned) ihm unbekannte (unknown to ...


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Aussagesatz (Hauptsatz mit Nebensatz als Objekt) Personalform des finiten Modalverbs befindet sich an zweiter Stelle (es heißt ja Ich möchte zeigen und nicht Ich zeige möchten) Infinitiv kann im Vorfeld stehen Also handelt es sich hier um korrektes Deutsch. Das einzige, was diese Konstruktion zu jener beginnend mit wir unterscheidet, ist - wie du richtig ...


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Answer to the first question: yes, reflexive pronouns can follow prepositions; just as in English by the way He is angry with himself. As for the second part: First of, we have to make a distinction between pronouns that simply refer back to the subject and such that relate individuals of a group subject to each other. The latter are called ...



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