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1

Perhaps what they meant was this: Bitte gib uns Bescheid, wenn du planst, teilzunehmen. where "teilzunehmen" is a single infinitive clause consisting only of "zu" and a verb. since the verb is separable, the "zu" is inserted between the separable prefix and the verb proper.


4

The reason seems to be that the sentence consists of three clauses and that infinitive clauses are treated much like subordinate clauses. [1,2] These are the three clauses: The main clause (Hauptsatz), "Bitte gib uns Bescheid". The subordinate clause (Nebensatz), "wenn du planst", which is dependent on the main clause. The infinitive clause ...


1

Der Hund will drau├čen bleiben. --> The (your) dog wants to remain outside. Vs You (customer)! Leave your dog outside! It is indirect and polite. Not directly addressing the customer. Since it's the dog being addressed and the customer is the master of the dog. The customer has the choice of leaving the dog outside or granting him ...


3

"Wollen" is same as "to want", but sometimes it can be used as "should", but to me as a native speaker this can sound distancing and arrogant. Example: Wollen Sie bitte dies zur Kenntnis nehmen. If someone would write this in an email to me I would be galled. The sentence "Der Hund will draussen bleiben." sounds to me whether someone didn't want to ...


3

Definitely humorous. "Wollen" is a modal verb but it always signals intent. There are phrasings that use it differently Die Hausaufgaben wollen gemacht sein. The homework has to be done/is to be done. Even this sounds quite a lot like "want to" to me, but anyway, this seems different to the dog example though as "bleiben" isn't passive at all.



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