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The sowohl … als auch (i.e. not only … but also) construct may be used to connect two parts of a sentence similar to und. When using this we have to take care that the logic behind each part remains intact. For the eample in question we could use the long form: Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, habe ich sowohl Methoden für die Verbesserung der mathematischen ...


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Considering your comment that the intended meaning is I improved the mathematics models and the numeric efficiency I would say Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen habe ich Methoden sowohl zur Verbesserung der mathematischen Modelle als auch der numerischen Effizienz der Löser eingebracht und umgesetzt. You have Mehoden zur Verbesserung eingebracht. ...


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In diesem Beispiel stehen die beiden Konjunktionen vor zwei verschiedenen geschachtelten Sätzen: Ich weiß, (dass, (nachdem er einen Job bekommen hat,) er sich einen Audi kaufte.) Die Satzstruktur wird klarer, wenn man die Bestandteile umdreht: Ich weiß, dass er sich einen Audi kaufte, nachdem er einen Job bekommen hat.


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I’m no native English speaker either, but I believe the idiom is stylistically more restricted, prefering a shared verb: Just as X is doing Y, so is Z Just as X does Y, so ?is Z Just as X does Y, so does Z It’s then similar in German, but (as in English) there are several similar alternatives: wie X Y tut, so auch Z so wie X Y tut, so auch ...


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"Genau wie X so Y" is absolutely fine, but is usually used with a noun phrase. This is the case when both parts have the same verb. It doesn't really work in your example, but it would be like this: Genau wie die öffentliche Meinung über Politik so ist auch das Vertrauen in John Does Versprechen schwächer geworden. But it's not restricted to a noun ...


5

I would use: So wie ..., ist auch ... In your example: So wie die öffentliche Meinung über Politik im Allgemeinen zum Negativen tendiert, ist auch das Vertrauen in John Does Versprechen weniger und weniger geworden.


2

Your first reading is correct: "nicht mehr" means "not any more" or "no longer" (i.e., something is not the case at the time of interest, but it was the case earlier). The tricky thing is just that the second negation lurks in "niemand" = "nicht jemand" (which could not be expanded as such here; instead your rewriting using "man" is fine - except that the ...


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Your assumption is correct. The first reading is definitly right and it is the only reading that makes sense. I am not sure what you mean by grammatically permissable according to the second reading, but generally unbedingt expresses a final state, means something can not be more or less unbedingt (absolute). Therefore mehr can not modify unbedingt the way ...


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I am actually not sure if I fully get the differences between (a) and (b) that you are pointing out - I get (a), but not necessarily (nicht unbedingt, [sic]) (b) - see below for an assumption. (a) For sure they had, late at night, when nobody cared so much any more and nobody absolutely insisted any more on what was right... You could also translate to ...


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Trotzdem and obwohl are both conjunctions that are both used to express the same thing: Causal disagreement between events in time. They differ, however, in the causal order of their arguments: E1, trotzdem E2 (Er war krank, spielte aber trotzdem Tennis) Event E1 is first in the timely order of events, the disagreeing event that is in the part of the ...


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Your first examples have different meanings. Er spielte Tennis, obwohl er krank war. He played tennis despite being sick. Er war krank, obwohl er Tennis spielte. Would rather mean that he was sick despite the fact he played tennis (because sports might be considered being good for your health) Sie ist nicht glücklick, trotzdem hat sie im ...


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If you leave the conjunction in the middle, there is a slight difference in meaning. First off the first example: Er spielte Tennis, obwohl er krank war. It implies that he shouldn't have played tennis because he was sick. Er war krank, obwohl er Tennis spielte. Implies that he shouldn't be sick, because he played tennis, as if him playing ...


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Das Verb steht im Hauptsatz immer an der zweiten Stelle: Ich schlafe auf dem Bett. Auf dem Bett schlafe ich. Im Fall deiner Frage ist der komplette Nebensatz das erste Satzglied, weshalb das Verb auch in diesem Fall an zweiter Stelle steht. Dass das Subjekt am Satzende steht, ist reiner Zufall, da der Hauptsatz keine weiteren Informationen ...



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