Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Ich nehme an, Du meinst mit ...'Verben, die mit dem Dativ funktionieren'... Verben, die im Hauptsatz ein Dativobjekt regieren. Denn mit dem Relativpronomen kann man auch einen Bezug mit dem Dativobjekt des Nebensatzes herstellen. Ich gebe dem (dat.), dem (dat.) ich die Antwort verraten habe, keine Schokolade (-> WEM habe ich die Antwort verraten) ...


3

There is no reason for the subject to come right after the verb. Indeed (1) 2003 hatten in der Schweiz ca. 42000 Skifahrer einen Unfall. and (2) 2003 hatten ca. 42000 Skifahrer in der Schweiz einen Unfall. are both grammatically correct. The first actually reads better. The reason for that is that we often put the interesting or new information ...


4

Yes, it's perfectly fine if the subject isn't in first or third position. The only fixed rule is V2 (verb in 2nd position). And in theory you can scramble the other parts as you like - putting those with an emphasis to the front. Note that in your quote it's actually two pieces of information that get an emphasis: Time and place. But as you must follow V2, ...


0

In cooking books one uses the shortest form possible. So the normal sentence "Man muß Nudeln kochen, dann Schinken schneiden, dann ..." gets the shorter form with infinitives: Nudeln kochen, Schinken schneiden etc.


1

You can see it that way: Nudeln kochen, ... is a description of the procedure to be followed, which gives all the information needed, if you would like to cook according to this recipe. It is not essential to write it as a command, the description will do.


5

In recipes, instructions and so on, the infinitive can be used instead of the imperative form. That's why the verb is at the end of the sentence, as usual for infinitives. As you say, the command form would be Kochen Sie die Nudeln! Schneiden Sie den Schinken in Streifen! ... (note the pronoun), but this is often perceived as too strong for ...


-2

You are talking about two things: Word order If you say »Koche Nudeln!«, then this theoretically is the sort form of »Du koche Nudeln!« or »Koche du Nudeln!« (but both sentences are unusual). This is because in »Koche Nudeln!« there is no subject. The subject is »du«. (It's the same in English: The subject in »Cook noodles!« is the omitted word »you«.) ...


0

Das tangiert deine Frage (»welcher Satz ist richtig?«) natürlich nur marginal – aber als wesentlich schöner empfinde ich folgende Varianten: Ich habe drei Zimmer reserviert. Drei Zimmer wurden (auf Ihren Namen) reserviert. Das vermeidet sowohl den etwas holprig empfundenen Nominalstil wie auch es gibt als Subjekt-Prädikat-Kombination. Wenn du ...



Top 50 recent answers are included