Tag Info

New answers tagged

7

"tröpfeln" belongs to a subclass of verbs called "Iterativa". They put emphasis on a repeating action and often have the additional meaning of a certain smallness of an action. They can be recognised by -eln, examples are sticheln, tröpfeln, streicheln, trippeln. When talking about "tröpfeln", you put emphasis on the fact that you put small droplets on your ...


2

Das war und bleibt ein Traum (für mich), dessen Erfüllung ich mir wünsche. "Das war mir ein Traum" is no familiar German sentence. If we take into account the abundance of genitive in contemporary spoken German, we should say: "Das war und bleibt ein Traum, von dem ich mir wünsche, er würde in Erfüllung gehen." or in short "Wenn dieser Traum nur ...


0

Mir scheint, neben den bereits von @CarstenSchulz genannten Beispielen gibt es andere (kurze) idiomatische Sätze, wo das "ich" oder "du" am Ende steht. "Das mach ich!" "(Den) hast du!" oder "Nimm du!" (Fussball)


4

Man kann sich durch den Satz durchbeißen. Dass er jedoch recht ungewöhnlich angeordnet ist, sieht man, wenn man heute weglässt: Das Buch gebe dir ich. Aber auch hier überlebt der Satz mMn, wenn man ich stärker markiert. Diese Freiheit scheint mir nur in gesprochener Sprache zu existieren. Ein Artikel von "Belles Lettres beschäftigt sich mit diesem ...


-1

In spoken language variant 1 is preferred. As a general rule you can say that when there is a shorter version the shorter one is preferred.


1

Structure-wise "erfüllen" has the same prototype as "geben". It is a transfer of object X (accusative) to receiver Y (dative) Ich gebe dir(y) etwas (x) "Erfüllen" is special in so far as only a very narrow semantic segment makes sense as X... wishes. Ich erfülle dir (y) einen Wunsch (x). The mere idea it could be one of the colloquial genitives ...


1

Usually, the expression Sie erfüllt den Kindern ihre Wünsche. simply means Sie erfüllt den Kindern die Wünsche. Here, the dative form „den Kindern“ is the Dativobjekt (indirect object): Das gehört den Kindern. Sie hilft den Kindern. Sie erfüllt den Kindern einen Wunsch. Sie erfüllt den Kindern alle Wünsche. Sie erfüllt den Kindern ...


0

Edit: as noted by @Loong, it's likely just a plain dative + accusative, only formulated in a way that gives the impression of a "his genitive" instead. So what follows is to be taken with caution. I think it's a case of "his genitive" in which the questionable/dialectal dative + possessive form ... den Kindern ihre Wünsche replaces the more correct ...


1

I would prefer the variant with "dass" in written German. Actually, this is a form of indirect speech, as something is repeated which is not a real event: the content of your thoughts. If it would be "ich dachte", then Konjunktiv would be used, either I or II.


4

Both are correct and both have exactly the same meaning. I would probably use the first (shorter) version, but I would not be irritated at all if somebody uses the second one; it is also idiomatic.


0

I would say it this way, but I am no native speaker: Im Sommer würde ich gern nach Italien fahren. (Based on: Ich würde gern ? im Sommer ? nach Italien ? fahren.) If you need to add mit meinem Mann, I would do this: Im Sommer würde ich mit meinem Mann gern nach Italien fahren. German word order is flexible, and you mustn't fall into the trap of ...


4

depends, what is more important comes after gerne. "Gerne" is a way to accentuate "würde". "Gerne" means "with pleasure", and after "würde" that means "would like" its a strong accentuation. Normally you say "gerne" after "würde" if you want to express a condition in a wish. It can be followed by "und nicht [...]" expressing something you hate most. Ich ...


8

You can put it almost everywhere. Ich würde [mit meinem Mann] gerne ... Ich würde gerne [mit meinem Mann] im Sommer... Ich würde gerne im Sommer [mit meinem Mann] nach Italien fahren. (Ich würde gerne im Sommer nach Italien mit meinem Mann fahren). The first 3 are perfectly idiomatic and there is little to no difference in emphasis. The last one ...


7

You would place the comma before "die Artikel zu lernen", if at all. This comma is facultative. Das wirklich Schwierige ist(,) die Artikel zu lernen. It's not easy to know when a comma is necessary, when optional and when plainly wrong. The rule that applies here is §75 E2. There's also a good summary that is very helpful.



Top 50 recent answers are included