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82

Quatsch is not vulgar at all and can be used in normal everyday speech to denote "nonsense": Kinder machen Quatsch. (The children fool around in a harmless and funny way, e.g. making faces.) But replying with "Quatsch!" might be percieved as offensive in the same way as "Nonsense!" would be in English - depending on the tone, facial expression and ...


23

When you follow from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schmuck_%28pejorative%29 to the German version, you will see that in German the word is spelled Schmock, which is something completely different from Schmuck. schmuck = Schmock jewelry = Schmuck It seems to be a case of a false friend. And let me add that I didn't know the word Schmock. Edit: ...


20

I have never connected dingsbums with bumsen. I don't think this connection is usually made. To me dingsbums is a perfectly fine word to use, albeit very colloquial and hence not necessarily appropriate in serious situations. It's only rude if you keep referring to somebody as dingsbums whose name you should know. ;-) Dingsda, dingenskirchen and ...


18

Here's an (incomplete) list of German language internet acronyms. Only one of them expresses a bodily reaction: BD - Bis dann BG - Breites Grinsen DAU - Dümmster anzunehmender User (cf. Luser) HGW - Herzlichen Glückwunsch IDA / IEA - Ich dich (euch) auch ILD - Ich liebe dich HDL - Hab' dich lieb HDGDL - Hab' dich ganz doll lieb kA - keine Ahnung (anglc.: ...


16

"krass" is actually not such a new word as it's modern slang usage suggests. It is a loanword from Latin "crassus" and as such shares the same etymology as the English "gross" does. In general usage "krass" is used for extremes in either a positive or mostly a negative connotation: Diese Aussage steht in krassem Gegensatz zu seiner sonstigen ...


15

There are, as in English, various ways of expressing this. Einen Moment, bitte or einen Augenblick, bitte -- this is absolutely common, sufficiently polite and probably the exact counterpart to One moment, please. You'd say that at the phone if you need to look up something. It's rather neutral, you don't indicate you are feeling pushed (you may add that ...


14

It is a short term for 'mal', that's all. I think the pro-word is Contraction. It even has a specific part about German dialects and contractions. edit: Also refer to Em1's answer & its comments: 'ma' (and 'wa' for this case) can also be used as contractions of 'wir'. Additionally I agree that none of this should be used in formal language.


13

The expression sich wegpissen has probably evolved from Sich wegschmeißen vor lachen (which is not vulgar) and Sich bepissen vor lachen. As has already been said by others, the latter one obviously comes from the imagination that you have to lough so hard you can't hold back your urine anymore. Like in your example you can say Dieses Video ...


10

As a programmer I call the technique "rubber ducking" and I have no German translation for that meaning of the term. I would translate "rubber duck" itself (i.e. the toy) as "Quietscheentchen" or "Badeente" as you already wrote, but I've never heard that translation used when referring to the technique. It is relatively common in computer sciences/IT that ...


9

Both words are standard German, but I think "genau" is used more often in small talk. As Jan says in his comment, if you're on the receiving end of a discission, it is quite sufficient to say "genau" at the appropriate points. To me, "stimmt" would sound less natural in this context (but that might indeed be a regional thing). For me, "stimmt" is connected ...


9

As mentioned in the other answer, its meaning here is mal. Also often used is ma in the sense of wir. Soll ma das machen? => Sollen wir das machen? Ham ma noch was Zeit? => Haben wir noch etwas Zeit? This is true for many parts of Germany, especially Northern Germany, and is not necessarily restricted to young people. However, note that the above ...


8

Ein Pauker ist ein Lehrer. Im Duden wird die Herkunft kurz erläutert: [gekürzt aus Arschpauker, eigentlich = jemand, der beim Unterrichten Schläge auf das Gesäß austeilt] (Schülersprache) Lehrer Die Redewendung "blau machen" bedeutet generell, bei etwas nicht anwesend zu sein, obwohl man es eigentlich muss, vor allem Arbeit und Schule. Ich habe ...


7

These are nonsense words like du-bi-du or schalalalala So there is no real meaning or translation for this. There was a time in German music when using nonsense words like these quite regularly. For example this song by a German cabaret artist.


7

"Krass" as a slang term can mean many different things from "cool" over "that's odd" to "what a pity". It depends on the situation. Colloquially it's an all purpose adjective, mainly used by young people. For emphasizing you can use it together with "voll". Examples: "Gestern ist meine Mutter gestorben." (Yesterday my mother died.) "Krass. Tut mir ...


7

Wahrscheinlich entstammt "abnibbeln" wie so manche umganggsprachliche Wörter aus dem Rotwelsch. Hierzu folgende Referenzen: Franka Birkholz: Rotwelsch - Die geheime Sprache sozialer Außenseiter: abnibbeln - sterben (jidd. niwel - verwelkt) Di Gojim: Kleines jiddisches Glossar: abnibbeln - hebräisch nawol = welken Denkbar ist auch die Herkunft ...


6

When referring to "you and your friends/family" exclusively (e.g. you ask one person if they and their friends family are coming over tonight), you'll often just use "ihr" if everybody knows who is addressed. For example, when I ask my sister: Kommt ihr Sonntag auch? Then it is implicitly clear that she, her husband and her children are addressed. ...


6

I would translate this to "geiler Scheiß": This preserves the rude language quite well and has also the positive connotation. As a sidenote: The internet-meme "shit was so cash" (as explained here) is sometimes (jokingly) translated literally to "Scheiße war so Bargeld".


6

I did not look up the definitions, but do think I have a (probably rather subjective :-)) concise interpretation of the definitions you asked about. I mostly do agree with 0x6d64, but not completely. As far as usage of words is concerned (referring to the definitions you asked about explicitly). Assuming you are not a native German speaker, then if a word ...


6

"Wo" propably originates from old hig german (h)wār and morphed to "wa, wo, war" later. This may explain that interjections with a similar meaning like "Ach was", "Pa wa", "A wa" share a same etymology. In the Grimm's we can read: IV. wo im gebrauch als interjektion findet sich umgangssprachlich in den verbindungen i wo, ach wo u. ä., die die ablehnung ...


6

This contraction of "friend" and "enemy" is only rarely found in contemporary German media, but it may be the starting point of a new loanword that will eventually make its way into common usage over time: Vielleicht lernen ja alle Beteiligten etwas daraus. Etwa, dass auf Dauer Kompromissbereitschaft unter geschäftlichen Frenemys wertvoll ist - Frenemy, ...


6

The correct spelling is ne and it's a common but informal interjection in many parts of Germany. It replaces nicht wahr? and oder? in some dialects. Note, that it does not mean Nein in this context1. The pronunciation may vary between dialects from a clear German e-sound to a German ä-sound. But it's definitely not pronounce with an ö-sound. Nö would again ...


5

In vulgar colloquial German two related sayings come to mind: "Aus Scheiße Geld machen" - to make a lot of money from sth. worthless "der Geldscheißer" - a fictional person that gives you all the money you need (Uncle Scrooge) In German both expressions have a slightly different meaning as compared to the Endlish expression but this also depends on the ...


5

Im Ruhrgebiet vor 49 Jahren geboren und aufgewachsen, muss ich als Zeitzeugin anmerken, dass ich mit diesem Ausdruck von Kindesbeinen an vertraut bin, dies fand deutlich vor 1990 statt. Ob er schon vor den 1960er Jahren existierte, ist mir aufgrund meiner persönlichen Noch-nicht-Anwesenheit jedoch nicht bekannt.


5

Since most phrases in youth language are very temporary, you won't find an up-to-date resource (even online). Also the well-established publisher Langenscheidt already failed to collect such phrases. Therefore, I would recommend that you just ask if someone uses such phrases. If you insist on hearing some phrases before you travel abroad, try to get in ...


5

According to German wiktionary: (translations below each line) Bedeutungen: (Meanings) [1] extrem, besonders intensiv (extreme, very intense) [2] (umgangssprachlich Ausruf der Überraschung) (colloquial expression of surprise)


4

It's not rude, most people wouldn't associate it with 'bumsen'. But it is definitely a very very informal word (if it can be called a word at all) and would seem very sloppy or even clumsy in any kind of formal setting. So just keep using it to score with German friends and otherwise don't use it at all. :) Same is true for 'dingsda' that's even more of a ...


4

Ich glaube, es bedeutet Der Lehrer. Correct. And yes, it is colloquial. But it has almost vanished, at least from colloqial language. The ngram shows it's usage is diminishing also in literature (while pauken - surprisingly - has increased recently): Edit: Note that pauken is (amongst other meanings) colloquial for lernen (not lehren) Concerning ...


4

Im Wikipedia-Artikel über den Ausruf "Ey!" steht, der Ausdruck sei als Teil der sogenannten Jugendsprache, restringierter Soziolekte/Ethnolekte aufgekommen und hätte als anerkennende Form weite Verbreitung im Rahmen der in den späten 1980er Jahren beliebten Mantawitze gefunden. Auch im Diagramm von Googles Ngram Viewer wird der Trend seit den achtziger ...


4

"Jungs", "Mädels", "Leute", depending on the context and gender. EDIT: Need to point out, I'm talking about non-formal, but generally polite language. Other forms are certainly possible, again depending on the context and in most cases the general language level people are speaking: "Kommt Ihr heut' rüber, Ihr Schweine?" is somewhat rude, but might be ...



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