New answers tagged

0

I don’t really see your problem, but of course there is a subordinate clause and it is initiated by dass. You can tell that it is one because: There is a subject (nominative ich) and a conjugated verb (antworte); if you extend it with an object, you realise that the verb is last: […] dass ich dir antworte. And it has to be dass (and not das) for a ...


7

It may sound surprising, but the subclause marked by dass can in fact be governed by verb, a noun or a substituting pronoun. Most common form: Ich verlange, dass du mir antwortest! Subclause governed by noun: Die Vorstellung, dass ich dir antworte, ist abwegig. Subclause governed by pronoun: Ich bestehe darauf, dass du mir antwortest! The ...


1

It is correct. If it were das instead, what word would be targeted by the article/pronoun?


5

All three spellings are routinely used. The "correct" spelling, of course, would be Jägertee (hunter's tea), but in my experience the other variants, particularly Jagertee [1] are actually more common. As is commonly the case with dialect expressions there is no fixed orthography, of course, hence the confusion. With that in mind, EC Regulation No 110/2008, ...


3

The Standard German terms and spellings for ‘hunter’ and ‘tea’ are Jäger and Tee, so their compound would be written Jägertee ‘hunter’s tea’. (If the left-side component ends with -er there usually is no fuseme “Fugenlaut” like s or n, therefore it’s not ?Jägerstee.) However, at least two types of words don’t necessarily have to follow basic graphotactic ...


1

Beide Schreibweisen sind völlig korrekt und Standard und entsprechen zwei meist deutlich unterscheidbaren Intonationsmustern. Oft ist aus dem Kontext klar, ob weißt du wahrscheinlich als Frage intoniert wird (du sehr hoch gesprochen, gefolgt von einer kleinen Sprechpause) oder nicht (du tiefer gesprochen als weißt), wobei letzteres der häufigere Fall ist. ...


1

Im Duden findet man Beispiele (jedoch ohne Hinweis auf eine Regel) für einen derartigen Gebrauch von „weißt du [was]“, die alle nicht mit einem Fragezeichen, sondern mit einem Komma geschrieben werden. In Band 2 – Das Stilwörterbuch mit der Bedeutung „ich schlage vor“: Weißt du was, wir fahren einfach dorthin. In Band 11 – Redewendungen mit der ...


3

German does not feature a 100 % phoneme to letter mapping. Some letters or their combinations can represent multiple phonemes: See lebendige which features three different phonemic varieties that are all written as e (/e/, /ɛ/ and /ə/). One of those cases is (much like in English) the letter s, which can be both voiced /z/ or unvoiced /s/.* Single s in ...


4

Weißt du, ich bin noch sehr neugierig auf … Ist die gängige Weise das aufzuschreiben. Als separaten Fragesatz würde man das eher im Fall der betonenderen Form verwenden: Weißt du was? Ich bin noch sehr neugierig auf … Obwohl man auch hier auch nur ein Komma setzen könnte.


2

It’s rather simple. If the two fragments of the word are next to each other in the way they would be in an infinitive, then connect them into one word. Otherwise, leave them apart.‡ This also gives you a hint to the pronunciation: If they are written together, pronounce it as one word, otherwise as two. In essence, you need to remember that only the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included