Hot answers tagged

23

Because the point of the point (pun intended) is to give the ordinal number instead of the cardinal number. Interestingly enough, English does use ordinal numbers for days when writing "on the fifth of May", or "May 5th" but omits the ordinal marker for dates like 05-05. German is more consistent as it always uses the '.' (Except for the YYYY-MM-DD format ...


14

If you want to learn German, then you learn standard German, which will be understood in all countries where German is spoken. But »nee« is not a standard-German word. It is a dialect word. »Nee« is part of many dialects, spoken mainly in mid and northern parts of Germany. But there are also German dialects, where »nein« is another word: See also here. If ...


11

We use the point to get the ordinal, not cardinal number. Compare: der 1. Platz (=der erste Platz) Straße des 17. Juni (=des siebzehnten Juni) That's why we must use the point in dates. According to the range - these would be some common ways of giving a time period: - 30. September 2015 vom 5. bis (zum) 30. September 2015 vom ...


11

According to Deutsche Post, a domestic mail address in Germany consists at least of [name] [street name and number] [postal code] [place of destination] For example: Erich Müller Goethestr. 13 22767 Hamburg However, it is customary to add the form of address in the accusative case. (In Switzerland, the form ‘Herr’ is considered permissible.) ...


10

It's a bit different from English, where all the following cases would translate into "with": If you learn something "mit jemandem" - Both are learning, that is, you learn "together with someone", probably both at the same level of knowledge. In case you learn something "bei jemandem" - One is learning, one is teaching (case #1, apparently your case), or ...


7

First of all, there is of course the verb kommentieren (to comment) itself. But if I understand you correctly you are out for verbs that you can use together with the noun Kommentar. It is difficult, if not impossible, to give a complete list, but here are some of the most common (IMHO): einen Kommentar lesen, schreiben, abgeben, verfassen, hinterlassen ...


6

“Nee” is not slang, it's simply dialect. This form of “nein” occurs in more than one, but definitely not in all German dialects. I am from Berlin, and even though I do not speak a real Berlin dialect, saying “nee” is one of these things that happen when I speak sloppily, but not in all instances, so I say “nein” often enough and would not find it in any way ...


5

Der Begriff „Autopilot“ ist ein Kompositum der zwei Begriffe „Automat“ und „Pilot“. Wikipedia Da gelten die Beugungsrsregel für das letzte Nomen, Pilot. Es ist egal, dass das nicht mehr ein echter Pilot ist. Auch abstrakte, leblose Objekte wie Graph beugt man mittels der N-Deklination – und auch in Akkusativ. Das ist die Theorie. Natürlich wäre ...


5

Als Nichtlateiner kenne ich nur ganz wenige, lateinische Phrasen, etwa "ad hominem" und darin ist das "ad" keine Abkürzung, wie auch der Screenshot 2 Verwendungen ohne Punkt zeigt, wärend ansonsten an Punkten nicht gespart wird. In "ad hominem" heißt "ad" soviel wie "zu" (zur Person), und also wird das Ad für Zu stehen, also "Zu Paragraph 18.20" im ...


4

Although Germany, Austria and Switzerland are federal countries like USA who consist of smaller states (»Bundesländer« in Germany and Austria, »Kantone« in Switzerland) you don't write those states into a post address. The reason is, that postal codes in those three countries are unique across the whole country. Postal code is written before the name of ...


3

Reading will help to improve your reading skills. Reading means: Consume language that others have produced without being able to hear it. Of all the possibilities to interact with a new language, reading is the most useless way to practice speaking skills. When you write in German (and get your writings corrected by someone who speaks German), you will be ...


3

If this particle is written it’s usually indeed spelled eh. It’s synonymous to longer ohnehin and sowieso, meaning ‘anyway’. In formal speech or writing, one of these should be used instead. An English translation of the example sentence would thus be: “I’m not hungry anyway.” PS: Also note that keinen often sounds like kein, but should still be written ...


3

Depends on what you mean to say: You can either say Anfang April werden.... Which means "we'll send out the tickets beginning of April" (like 1/04-5/04) or Ab Anfang April werden... saying "starting from beginning of April we will be sending out tickets" (But that process could last until November...) And in my opinion, the usage of "ab" has ...


2

Yes, this is correct. "Anfang April" is used for one time activity. "Ab Anfang April" is correct too but it's used for regular activities - "Ab Anfang April werde ich jede Woche ins Kino gehen".


2

You don't need to speak Swiss German, but understanding it will probably be necessary, as in my experience some Swiss refuse/or are unable to speak an understandable Swiss Standard German. When I (German native from northern Germany with no exposure to Swiss German) went on holidays to Switzerland I several times had to switch to English to avoid a ...


2

I am native Swiss so here's what I think about: Swiss German is a german dialect, not a proper language. Learning Swiss German for a non-native is a huge task because it has up to 26 dialects at least and even in these 26 there are differences between villages. These dialects are old grown and we identify each other by hes/her dialect. In School we all ...


2

First off, note that both words are not used a lot in colloquial. These are rather formal words. However, in this case, as so often, it's important to understand how the prefixes an- and be- affect the meaning. Admittedly, it's hard to grasp for be-. But basically the prefixes are the opposites to aus- and ent-. The word pair an-/aus- is pretty simple. ...


2

They are not exact synonyms. For example, in figural speech, you can "ein Amt bekleiden" (hold an office) but you cannot "ein Amt ankleiden". Ankleiden means the act of putting on a dress. (change from undressed to dressed) Bekleiden is rather used figuratively ("ein Amt bekleiden") or in the form "mit etwas bekleidet sein" (to wear something).


1

"Ankleiden" is the action of actually dressing up - From naked to fully in clothes. Mainly used in the reflexive form, but you can also dress up someone else. Works only for actual clothing. "Bekleiden" has the general meaning of "to cover" - Can be used for putting someone else into clothing, i.e dressing up someone else Describing the action that ...


1

It's actually pretty easy: "bei dir" is referring to the location "mit dir" is referring to the person. So if you were happy to learn "with her" - which I would assume - you would use "mit dir". If you were happy to study with her at her new place then you would use "bei dir"... Hope it helps...


1

Well, to learn vocabulary and grammar in a class is boring and strenuous. My method is different. I begin with simplest children's stories for 5-year-old children. These stories are interesting, they are illustrated in colours with one or two sentences on each page and they are short. Furthermore they often contain dialogues. Of course, I need a dictionary ...


1

Well, the answer is probably the same for any language: learn the vocabulary and grammar in a class. But besides books and people in class, there is something that I found very good for learning English and it sure applies also for German: Watch TV series on DVD. The reasons for this are as follows: A TV series runs longer than a movie. This gives you time ...


1

I find watching German films that are about things I know a lot about helps, for example I am a WWII enthusiast and watch documentaries and war movies in German so I don't have to read subtitles I can just watch and since I already know about the events taking place I can infer what they are saying. It is like reading and figuring out the meaning of a new ...


1

Actually for spoken German you need a language environment,a group learning. Reading a newspaper will help you up to some extent. But you should join any German learning institutes. Goethe institutes are best for such learning.


1

Latin ad (or German zu, zu[m] Punkt) is used similar to re (bezüglich = bzgl., in Sachen / in der Sache/Angelegenheit) – as popularized by email subject lines – in sophisticated German. The former is most often used with numbered items as in enumerated or ordered lists, but sections or paragraphs in this case, the latter more with spelled out topics, and re ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible