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1

"Ankleiden" is the action of actually dressing up - From naked to fully in clothes. Mainly used in the reflexive form, but you can also dress up someone else. Works only for actual clothing. "Bekleiden" has the general meaning of "to cover" - Can be used for putting someone else into clothing, i.e dressing up someone else Describing the action that ...


2

First off, note that both words are not used a lot in colloquial. These are rather formal words. However, in this case, as so often, it's important to understand how the prefixes an- and be- affect the meaning. Admittedly, it's hard to grasp for be-. But basically the prefixes are the opposites to aus- and ent-. The word pair an-/aus- is pretty simple. ...


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They are not exact synonyms. For example, in figural speech, you can "ein Amt bekleiden" (hold an office) but you cannot "ein Amt ankleiden". Ankleiden means the act of putting on a dress. (change from undressed to dressed) Bekleiden is rather used figuratively ("ein Amt bekleiden") or in the form "mit etwas bekleidet sein" (to wear something).


0

Ich lerne bei dir. Ich lerne bei dir Deutsch. Ich gehe oder fahre zu dir nach Hause, zu deinem Arbeitsplatz oder an einen anderen Ort an dem du gewohnheitsmäßig anzutreffen bist. Dort, an diesem Ort lerne ich. Es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass ich mich zu dir begebe, um dort mit oder von dir zu lernen, aber »bei dir lernen« macht eigentlich nur ...


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It's actually pretty easy: "bei dir" is referring to the location "mit dir" is referring to the person. So if you were happy to learn "with her" - which I would assume - you would use "mit dir". If you were happy to study with her at her new place then you would use "bei dir"... Hope it helps...


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It's a bit different from English, where all the following cases would translate into "with": If you learn something "mit jemandem" - Both are learning, that is, you learn "together with someone", probably both at the same level of knowledge. In case you learn something "bei jemandem" - One is learning, one is teaching (case #1, apparently your case), or ...


3

If this particle is written it’s usually indeed spelled eh. It’s synonymous to longer ohnehin and sowieso, meaning ‘anyway’. In formal speech or writing, one of these should be used instead. An English translation of the example sentence would thus be: “I’m not hungry anyway.” PS: Also note that keinen often sounds like kein, but should still be written ...



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