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1

The sentence is a good example of how we can introduce several levels of uncertainty in a statement. The doctor who wrote this managed to include 5 of them: Es ist eine Osteonekrose. Es ist eventuell eine Osteonekrose. Eine Osteonekrose kommt eventuell in Betracht. Auch eine Osteonekrose kommt eventuell in Betracht. Auch eine ...


2

There is nothing in this sentence that requires the use of the subjunctive. Kommt auch eine Osteonekrose in Betracht? is a correct sentence with the same meaning. However, since the question implicitly suggests that whoever is asked has overlooked or wrongly excluded the possibility of an osteonecrosis, I would often use a Konjunktiv II of politeness ...


2

As rogermue correctly pointed out, Konjunktiv II is used to express a possibility. The fragment presented in the question is either a question or part of a statement. (It is not a stand-alone statement because the verb needs to be in the second place of the sentence in a statement.) Question: Käme eventuell auch eine Osteonekrose in Betracht? ...


-1

By "käme in Betracht" (past subjunctive) a remote possibility is expressed, meaning "something might be possible".


2

I don't see anything special in this sentence. "könne" relates to "Das waren Erwartungen, nachdem die Euphorie der Revolution verflogen war.", basically the same as in: Er erwartet, dass es noch schlimmer kommt: die aufgepumpte Bundesrepublik könne sich rückwärts entwickeln, zu einem neualten Reich des Bösen. "könne" is indirect speech triggered by ...


2

I do not think you can. The Konjuntiv in the latter paragraph rather seems to be a continuation of a quotation in the former paragraph, although it is not marked as one. If no author is given, I would assume that the article's author is trying to express a general sentiment he felt at the time in the form of a fictional quote.


1

In Middle High German, Konjunktiv Präsens (I) was used differently; (Jaeckh 2011) mentions "goal-oriented contexts (wishes, demands, intentions)" or potentiality (page 11). Some of this has survived, like commands: Wer noch Karten will, melde sich. (jussive mood) Seien Sie vorsichtig! (jussive mood used as imperative) Seien wir nicht so streng! ...


2

There are three Konjunktiv forms in German: Konjunktiv I, Konjunktiv II and the "würde"-Konjunktiv. The main purpose of Konjunktiv I is in reported speech; you are asking for the conditional use: Here you have to take Konjunktiv II or the "würde"-Konjunktiv. (I'm listing the Konjunktiv I forms just for completeness.) The main verb in your sentence is ...


1

The exact same thing happens in English. One would say: Let ψn(x) be the characteristic function of the Hamiltonian operator Ĥ. This has a different meaning than: ψn(x) is the characteristic function of the Hamiltonian operator Ĥ.


6

Es sei denn is an almost if not fully fossilised expression which originated when our vocabulary was different and which somehow survived. Therefore, you cannot understand it with today’s German alone (compare with the English all of a sudden). Thus, as a language learner, the best way to deal with it is learning it like a vocabulary. As for the origin of ...


-1

Der Konjunktiv kann vieles ausdrücken, indirekte Rede, hypothetische Annahmen wie in der Mathematik: A sei eine fixe/variable Größe. "Es sei denn, dass" könnte man etwa herleiten mit: Außer wir nehmen an, A sei B. Ein typisches Beispiel für eine hypothetische Annahme ist etwa: Nehmen wir ein mal an, die Erde sei keine Kugel, sondern eine flache Scheibe. ...


1

In German, the conditional mood is expressed by the subjunctive II, so the answers should be the following: Der Brief wird von mir geschrieben. Der Brief würde von mir geschrieben. Der Brief wurde von mir geschrieben. Der Brief wäre von mir geschrieben worden. Der Brief ist von mir geschrieben worden. Der Brief wäre von mir geschrieben ...


1

This is an interesting case. In English, one could say something in the lines of "I think she's pregnant" or "I'd say/guess/bet she's pregnant" to have a similar effect. Since the extra part "I think" and "I'd say/guess/bet" in such clauses is equivalent to an adverb such as "apparently" or "probably", Halliday and Matthiessen consider that they are a ...


1

"möchte" is not rarely used. It is normally used for polite wishes in a shop or restaurant. Ich möchte ein Paar Sommerschuhe. Ich möchte etwas essen/eine Tasse Kaffee. In "man möchte meinen" "möchte" expresses the idea: es ist möglich/ die Möglichkeit besteht. Another variant, as often used, is "man könnte meinen".


0

If it were a "true" conjunctive II, Man würde meinen mögen, [...] would sound natural, but it doesn't (to me), so I'm going for "no". The corresponding periphrasis of Das wäre dann wohl geschafft, where wäre is not a true conjunctive, too, doesn't sound natural either. (Similarly: Wie viel wäre...?, Das wären dann..., Könnten Sie...? etc.) Although ...


2

The tables below represent the variants for tenses and modes used in spoken language. According to my experience of listening to my partner and to friends, at least in Northern Germany it seems that only two primary tenses (past and non-past) and two modes (non-conjunctive and wenn-conjunctive) are often used in spoken language. Most process terms seem to ...


9

An important thing to know about Konjunktiv is, that although the Konjunktiv II is derived from the Präteritum which is a past tense, the meaning of Konjunktiv II is present! So you have: sie ist (Präsens Indikativ) - sie sei (Konjunktiv I) - sie wäre (Konjunktiv II) All these forms actually have present meaning. That's not too different from English ...


0

The given sentence is written in past tense. Sie war gesund. Sie brauchte die Ärztin nicht. (She was healthy. She didn't need a doctor.) Your solution is not valid, as the first part is present, whereas the second one is past. Your solution would be grammatically correct if you wrote Wenn sie gesund wäre, bräuchte sie die Ärztin nicht. Though ...



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