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27

Ich weiß nicht, ob es noch aktuell ist, da wegen der Mobilfunkverbreitung private Festnetztelefone immer seltener angerufen werden, aber früher habe ich das so gehandhabt: bei + Nachname also zum Beispiel bei Schmidt Eventuell kann man auch noch den eigenen Namen erwähnen, wenn es sehr formell sein muss: Bei Schmidt – Sie sprechen mit Thomas ...


18

Yes, it works. The most popular way to say this is: Sie haben sich verwählt. An example dialogue: Guten Tag, ich möchte bitte Jonas sprechen. Wen? Jonas? Hier wohnt kein Jonas, ich glaube, Sie haben sich verwählt. or: Sie sind offensichtlich falsch verbunden. or: Anscheinend haben Sie eine falsche Nummer gewählt. ...


13

There are indeed many people just saying "Hallo?" or "Ja?". But also very common with most pople answering a private (landline) number and not knowing the caller, is saying their last name. If it's a business phone, then of course you say the name of the company, your full name and a greeting.


13

I think it depends if you're answering a personal cell phone or a landline phone which is used by more than one person. When I answer my cell phone and I the caller ID is shown on the display, I answer according to my relationship to the caller. For example: (friend) Hallo, Anna! (or simply) Hallo! (business related) Guten Tag! (or very ...


12

I usually say something like "So, da bin ich wieder." If it has to be a bit more formal, I'd say "Hören Sie?" to announce I'm back and at the same time make sure they're ready to continue.


11

Yes, you can say so, but it is a bit formal. The most common way to phrase it is with verwählen: Sie haben sich verwählt. Both phrases are very blunt, though, and in essence tell the caller that they made a mistake. In order to make it more polite, you would add some uncertainty (even if you are indeed dead sure that they are wrong) and possibly add ...


4

There’s plenty of ways introducing oneself on the phone in German. You already showed one. Hallo Tante Helga, Michael hier. (Michael here) Hallo Tante Helga, ich bin’s, Michael. (it’s me, Michael) Hallo Tante Helga, hier ist (der) Michael. (here’s [the] Michael) That’s rather colloquial, which was what you asked, right? When calling an ...


4

Some people answer their phone with “Ja, bitte?”, which directly tranlates to “Yes, please?” I think this is what your prof meant.


3

It is getting more and more accepted to simply say "Hallo" when answering the phone. Personally, I don't like this kind of greeting. Voices on the phone often sound quite different than they do in real life. I often don't recognize the person on the other end and have to ask something like "Bill, is that you?" So, I'd suggest that on a private number you ...


3

IMO saying at least your last name when answering your phone is a matter of politeness: humans voices tend to sound unfamiliar over the phone, so the caller can easily know if he got the right person without the awkward question "X, is that you?". I talked to people, which rather not say their name when answering their private phone due to privacy concern, ...


1

Technically, falsch verbunden is no longer correct. It applied to the olden days when one called the operator first and was connected to one’s partner. (In Germany, that was typically the job of the Fräulein vom Amt.) It could then have happened that these people accidentally connected the wrong lines which resulted in falsch verbunden. Nowadays, the ...


1

I answer the phone by simply saying "Ja?", or my surname and nothing else. The caller greets the callee with a "Hallo", however I see more and more people change that to either localized greetings or general greetings, like "morgen", "guten tag", "guten abend", etc. It seems quite weird to answer Skype calls with a Hallo, for some reason. For some reason, ...



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