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10

It is Perfekt Passiv of bauen ... Vorgangspassiv to be precise. Das Haus wird gebaut. (Präsens) Das Haus ist gebaut worden. (Perfekt) Das Haus wurde gebaut. (Präteritum) I will not give translations as the notion of the tenses in German and English are not the same. Both past forms are to an extend interchangeable. What threw you of was ...


9

Also, im Satz deiner Lehrerin ist auf jeden Fall schon mal ein werden zu viel. Der Satz lautet wenn schon: Die Alliierten wollten, dass Deutschland so gehindert sein wird, dass das Land nie wieder eine Bedrohung für die Welt darstellen kann. Wie kommt man dahin? "Die Alliierten wollten..." ist ja klar ein Punkt in der Vergangenheit. Alles worauf du ...


9

No. That's wrong. The German language does not contain such a feature as English does. Hence, you use the simple present. From context it's clear if the action happens right now or not. However, to avoid any misunderstandings, you can add words like gerade (English right now) for clarification. Thus, "He is going" is translated to "Er geht (gerade)". ...


8

Ich kaufte einen Computer sounds wrong to me even in written form. Perhaps it would be okay if you're writing a novel and were describing the circumstances of buying a computer. But in a normal sentence I'd prefer Ich habe einen Computer gekauft. While: Das Wetter war schön am Dienstag. Ich lag den ganzen Tag in der Sonne. is perfectly ...


8

Yes, that is absolutely possible, though rare in practice (unless it is an intentional pun in jokes, book titles etc.). One well-known unintentional example is das gelobte Land (the Promised Land). Martin Luther coined it from geloben, which now is obsolescent; many people today therefore think it is derived from loben and understand it as the praised land. ...


7

You use Präteritum for events which are not yet completed or for which the time doesn’t matter. In novels for example Präteritum is used more often. There is a really good article in German on this topic: Präteritum oder Perfekt?


6

Imagine two friends, Hans and Willi. Hans has just lugged a sack of cement up a flight of stairs. Satisfied with his performance, he exhales: Uff, geschafft. Willi grins at him and asks: Geschafft oder... geschafft? The wordplay comes from the fact that the participle geschafft can mean both "done", "accomplished", "complete" (as in Ich habe es ...


5

As a general note because people tend to confuse this: Obviously, many written texts use the Präteritum, even though one gets the impression that it is scarcely used in everyday life. Now, this does not imply that Präteritum is the past tense used in written form whereas Perfekt is the kind of informal spoken form of it. Nor does it mean that one needs to ...


5

For the spoken language, a good guideline is indeed to use the Perfekt, except for auxiliary and modal verbs and a few other very common verbs (can't say which ones, unfortunately). To expand on the example in splattne's answer (I wouldn't say "Ich lag den ganzen Tag in der Sonne", and sorry, I'm a bad narrator): Das Wetter war schön am Dienstag. Ich ...


5

I'm not sure if this answers your question, because I'm not sure what you mean with "aspect" in this context. Just let me say it is handled a little bit different in German: A tense in German is called "Zeitform" or "Tempus" (plural: Tempora). We have the following Tempora in German: Präsens, Präsensperfekt, Präteritum, Präteritumperfekt, Futur, ...


5

The example you gave is interesting indeed, as from their etymology both words do come from the same root "hören" (Old High German hōren). They also have the same origin with the English "to hear" (Old English hēran). The prefix 'ge-' to build "gehören" was used to emphasis hearing, and also is found in both, Old High German (gihōren), and Old English ...


5

Er ist am Gehen can be heard in colloquial German, but generally in German there's no difference between the simple form and the continuous form. That's why it is so hard for us to grasp the concept :-) Jokingly people call this the "Rheinische Verlaufsform", because it is very often heard in the Rheinland area. You can hear gems like Weißt du, was du ...


4

There are many verbs that have several different meanings. Especially the ones with prefixes. However, most of the time, the grammar will tell them apart just like in your example. Here are a few context dependent ones.. however, one meaning is dominant for each of them. Das Licht geht nicht an. (doesn't work/is totally not ok) Ich stelle mir die Uhr vor. ...


4

In this case just looking up words in a dicitonary without looking closely at context may be confusing indeed. The example you gave also is a good example of how this confusion can arise. Of course does Gesang translate to singing but in this case it is not the English present continuous of to sing but it is the noun the singing. To overcome this we should ...


4

So here is my try - the following verbs might be used in either way in spoken language, sometimes depending on what you want to say, sometimes it is just random or personal preference or flow of speech: gehen - ging Should be used in the sense of "to work" or "to be". Ich wäre gerne zu deiner Party gekommen, aber es ging nicht. If you go places, use ...


4

In großen Teilen des deutschen Sprachgebiets wird ein -e am Wortende regelmäßig ausgelassen (Apokope), man sagt also beispielsweise ich fahr’ statt ich fahre oder müd’ statt müde. Nur in einem relativ schmalen Streifen vom Emsland nach Brandenburg ist das -e in den Dialekten erhalten. Wo die Apokope durchgeführt ist, fällt bei schwachen Verben in der ...


4

Im gesprochenen Deutsch wird im Grunde kein Imperfekt verwendet, das Perfekt ist da das allgemeine Vergangenheitstempus. Andererseits vermeidet man im Gesprochenen auch gerne das Passiv, es ist eher Schriftdeutsch mit Anklängen von "Behördendeutsch". Was macht ein Sprecher stattdessen? Aktiv, wenn derjenige "Täter", der etwas tut, wichtig ist (die ...


4

Unfortunately I am not a linguist and thus am unable to scientifically answer your question but let me try to give you my humble understanding of the linguistic concept of aspect in German grammar. Like in English German has only a limited morphological spectrum for flexion of verbs, these include the tenses "Präsens", and "Präteritum". Im Deutschen ...


4

According to "Handbuch zur Deutschen Grammatik", that is called a "perfect infinitive" (p. 104). If "sein" is the infinitive, then "gewesen sein" is its perfect infinitive. Note that this is also used in the future perfect tense. yes, I believe you are correct. The Handbuch says (p. 113) Modals with perfect infinitives express a present-tense ...


4

This is not passive... it is a regular active sentence with müssen and a "infinitive-ized" (please indulge my lack of terminology) present perfect of "to be good" :) I am not native English but I'd say it is exactly this. I think the difference between the English sentences is: "It had to be good." I think the dominant meaning of that is that the concert ...


4

In German you wouldn't use the participle in such a way. If you want to explicitly express that somebody is doing something right now, you could use the word "gerade" as in Er liest gerade. The phrase "Er is am gehen" is indeed used in spoken German, but it hardly ever means that "he's walking at the moment". In almost all cases it means "he is just ...


3

That's passive voice in perfect tense: Das Haus ist 1924 gebaut worden. The house has been built in 1924. Passive in past tense would be Das Haus wurde 1924 gebaut. The house was built in 1924. As to why this passive structure uses "worden" instead of "geworden", here's an explanation I found in a forum post: Die Wäsche ist ...


3

Zahlungsinformation wird aktualisiert. This is basically your second option without the mistakes. Both are present tense, the first one active, the second passive voice.


2

Well, this question is not that easy to answer. I don't know of any research which states a clear answer to this question. Anyway. I agree to what has been said in comments: modal verbs are usually used in simple past. But present perfect is not uncommon. You will not only find a lot of examples on the Internet but also hear that in colloquial ...


2

I can't give a qualified answer, but as I have learned English as a foreign language, I can say that in almost all books for English learners "I am walking" is considered present progressive tense, so these books may not really be good sources. On the other hand, I don't think that your example of "Ich bin gegangen" can be understood in aspect. It doesn't ...


2

Consecutio temporum was part of the German gramma and therefore is kept as such by some people. (See its German wikipedia entry for that.) In the usual language (in spoken rather than written), it can be used but is neither required nor expected. So, as long as you don't use a relatively future tense for the relatively past tense, it's more or less up to ...


2

«Die Alliierten wollten, dass Deutschland so gehindert wäre, dass das Land nie wieder eine Bedrohung für die Welt darstellen könnte.» Was ist das für ein Kuddelmuddel? Wäre Deutschland gehindert nie wieder eine Bedrohung zu sein, dann würde dies bedeuten, dass die Alliierten Deutschland rasch zu einer Bedrohung machen wollten. «Die Alliierten ...


2

There is no such resource for your special case. You can verify this by searching the internet, for instance with these search words learn deutsch online verb tenses examples or Deutsch lernen Verb Zeitformen Übungen. Instead you will find lots of good online learning tools, which either explain you the tenses and give only some examples, or give you verb ...


1

Let me try to exemplify in one (incomplete) sentence the spectrum of prepositions that singen could accept: Gestern haben wir vor vielen Menschen wärend des Abendessens dank der Großzügikeit Herrn X für {eine Hochzeit · Gott · den Teufel} (je nach deinem Geschmack) (...) gesungen.



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