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In general both forms are used to describe what happened in the past. Usually in spoken language there is no differentiation between Präteritum and Perfekt. Präteritum sounds more formal whereas Perfekt is commonly used and sounds more familiar. typical perfect in spoken language: "Ich habe das Bad geputzt und danach die Wäsche gewaschen." In a newspaper ...


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This is one of the "catalog use cases" of Plusquamperfekt (past perfect) in German, which is very rarely used in the contemporary language. Plusquamperfekt, as you rightly say, is used for actions (and states) that have already happened or were apparent before the perfect. As all of your story is in perfect, it is used to express that the horses have been ...


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Switching tenses like this when they obviously aren't applicable is a literary device; it expresses excitement or even incoherence. For instance, you might be telling a story in the past tense, and at a riveting development you switch to the present tense to add immediacy to the effect you're having. This passage simply makes more extensive use of that ...


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It's also possible in english. Oh, das tut mir leid; aber ich bin in fünf Minuten zurück. Oh, im sorry; but I'm back in five minutes.


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According to Miell & Schenke,1 In German, the present tense – rather than the future tense – is normally used to refer to the future, especially when this is clearly indicated by an expression of time: Ich komme gleich wieder. I’ll be right back. In zwei Tagen bin ich in New York. In two days, I’ll be in New York. Das Konzert ...


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It’s not exactly the state of being that is necessarily used. Rather, future tense is used very rarely in German altogether, and present tense pretty much substitutes it in all context. That not only includes state verbs like sein but also verbs of any kind of activity: ‘Morgen packe ich die Sachen aus.’ So note that where your English version includes the ...


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Your conjecture is correct. Future tense is used rather rarely in German. Most of the time, present tense is used to express future actions (not just intended future actions), in particular if there is some time specification that makes clear that we are not talking about the present: Ich komme morgen um 10 Uhr. Die Sonne geht morgen um 5:30 Uhr auf....


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There are no German verb forms that are exclusive to subordinate clauses. However, there are irregular German verbs, often called strong verbs (starke Verben). These are typically characterised by a change of the stem vowel in the different tenses. In this case, vorliegen behaves exactly like liegen (vorliegen is also separable, so the present tense is ‘es ...


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Vorlagen is the past Präteritum of vorliegen, 1st and 3rd persons in plural. It has no relation whatsoever with subordinate clauses. What you might have done: Check if the verb is separable – you might want to learn the prefixes that make a verb separable. For two-part-verbs, (as in this case), then look up the conjugation of the root.



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