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1

Check out this set at Memrise: http://www.memrise.com/course/47458/100-most-common-german-verbs-used-in-all-tenses/ I'm not sure about downloading offline or not, and I personally prefer to do them on the computer, but it's very helpful for constructing those really crazy verb tenses.


2

There is no such resource for your special case. You can verify this by searching the internet, for instance with these search words learn deutsch online verb tenses examples or Deutsch lernen Verb Zeitformen Übungen. Instead you will find lots of good online learning tools, which either explain you the tenses and give only some examples, or give you verb ...


9

No. That's wrong. The German language does not contain such a feature as English does. Hence, you use the simple present. From context it's clear if the action happens right now or not. However, to avoid any misunderstandings, you can add words like gerade (English right now) for clarification. Thus, "He is going" is translated to "Er geht (gerade)". ...


5

Er ist am Gehen can be heard in colloquial German, but generally in German there's no difference between the simple form and the continuous form. That's why it is so hard for us to grasp the concept :-) Jokingly people call this the "Rheinische Verlaufsform", because it is very often heard in the Rheinland area. You can hear gems like Weißt du, was du ...


4

In German you wouldn't use the participle in such a way. If you want to explicitly express that somebody is doing something right now, you could use the word "gerade" as in Er liest gerade. The phrase "Er is am gehen" is indeed used in spoken German, but it hardly ever means that "he's walking at the moment". In almost all cases it means "he is just ...



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