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13

I guess the “-” in “gestern-heute” is not meant as a hyphen, but rather as a dash. So it should be written “gestern – heute”. Both words are used here in a figurative sense, representing past and present. So I would expect the article to contrast past and present aspects of the 9/11 attack. A word gestern-heute or gesternheute doesn’t exist, as Grantwalzer ...


13

The expression is not es gleich. The es belongs to es regnet (it is raining, it rains). In this context, gleich means in a moment, immediately or in a little while. The es comes after regnet, because the sentence is a simple positive sentence where, in German, the verb takes the second position (Verbzweitstellung) after the sicher (surely). So the sentence ...


10

X-er normally means "someone doing X" (backen -> Bäcker etc.), but is here used for the action itself. Fuchtler < fuchteln "to brandish, to wave about". Close enough, "Prügler" would have been too strong. Einigler < ein-igeln "to curl up like a hedgehog". Pretty good translation, as "to curl" is difficult to translate. Walzer < walzen "to roll, to ...


8

Was is short for etwas (something) here and is the required object for abarbeiten. Thus the sentence means Now I can finally work some things off. or more freely: Now I can finally get some work done.


6

A term related to "Jäger" is "Schütze" ("rifleman"). So you could call that man "Bergschütz" or "Waldschütz". The latter actually exists as a family name. Whether this is also true for the former I don't know. It has the advantage that it is closer to your intended meaning - and the disadvantage (in my eyes) that "Bergschützen" is often used as name for gun ...


5

In der Mathematik/Logik Kalkül


5

You're right, "Was würdest du mir sagen?" (mind that the "zu" is wrong there) translates to "What would you say to me?. I would translate "What would you like me to say?": Was möchtest du, dass ich sage. I think in general the structure What [do you want | would you like...] me to [do | say | ask... ] is in German Was [willst | möchtest...] ...


5

Addition to the given answer: "was" as abbreviation for "etwas" is mainly colloquially used. See also http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/etwas. In professional writing you should better avoid it (citations and direct speech excluded), if not the overall writing style is colloquial and thus "demands" it.


5

The technical term in the US is "slack-fill", however consumers aren't likely to know what this means. (In terms of potato chips and other vacuum-packed goods, this is also called "headspace"): Slack-fill is the difference between the actual capacity of a container and the volume of product contained therein. In order to explain this concept to ...


4

To make it explicit: The phrase ... but I would prefer to speak in German. translates to ..., aber ich ziehe es vor, deutsch zu sprechen. The additional word lieber, as mentioned in the other answer, is wrong in my opinion as you could translate your phrase to ..., aber ich würde lieber deutsch sprechen. which is also correct, but combing ...


4

The most common translation would be In meiner Klasse sind 20 Schüler. Or Bei mir sind 20 Schüler in der Klasse. Another possibility is In meiner Klasse hat es 20 Schüler. One would not use "es gibt" in that case because the sentence is only about the number of students while "es gibt" focusses more if an object exists or not. A more ...


4

In this example, was is an abbreviation of etwas. So it's a normal object, not a modal particle.


3

It's probably not supposed to be one word, because gesternheute seems contradictory (an antinomy), except maybe in the sense of "either yesterday and/or today" (and then it would be my first encounter with it). Meaning: As things are standing it doesn't have some acknowledged meaning. You can still interpret meaning into it, like you can into ...


3

I understand that you are looking for fantasy names, but if you want some realism there are a few things to consider: One of the most important functions of family names is to distinguish families within a community. So if ten families live together in a village on a mountain, their names are unlikely to refer to this rather obvious fact. Instead, they ...


3

"Was soll ich dazu sagen?" - Google Translate or other translation services fail here because of the English source grammar, where me and to had an ambiguous relation from a machine's view. Only on searching for a probably manually added idiomatic phrase "What would you like me to do?" the resulting translation gets it correct. To find our way out of this ...


3

Your composition is fine, but I think it suggests (due to the composition) that they're hunters, who primarily hunt in the hills. If you want them to be hunters in general, who simply come from the hills, I'd suggest (more freely) Die Jäger des Hügellandes Not quite the usual family name, but still: Tyson, Jäger des Hügellandes Sounds maybe a ...


3

Synonymous to Jäger in the non-military sense of the word (the people hunting for game) would be Weidmann or Waidmann. This is still referenced today in the greeting between hunters: "Waidmannsheil! - Waidmanndank!" It would avoid any military associations although I still don't feel comfortable with any composite words in this case (quite long to be a ...


3

There is not the answer, but I think the most common and formal one would be Vielen herzlichen Dank


2

There is no single word/phrase that expresses everything that to catch up with someone conveys. the meaning to catch up with a friend: (i.e. to meet them and tell them everything that happened since you last met them, as far as I understand the English phrase): There is no German phrase for that at all. We just say things like Ich treffe mich am Abend ...


2

My translation would be: Better a genie in bed than a genius at the desk. As Toscho pointed out in the comments, this could refer to the speaker him/herself, so an alternative would be Better in bed with a genie, than at the desk with a genius.


2

As already said, it is: "... aber ich ziehe es lieber vor, Deutsch zu sprechen" Please make sure that the comma isn't missing. Please Note: "Lieber" is an additional word, so it is not needed in this case.


2

The "best way" depends on the context in which it is used. Without any further details I would say: Vielen, vielen Dank. If it should be a little more personal: Vielen lieben Dank.


2

What would you like me to say. My translation would be: Was möchtest du (denn), dass ich dazu sage. or: Was soll ich deiner Meinung nach dazu sagen.


2

To thank in a regular way, in Germany, you say Dankeschön! while in Austria you say Danke sehr! But you can use both phrases in both countries. For a more intense way to thank, you can say in both countries: Vielen, vielen Dank or Ich danke vielmals! Sadly, I dont know how they thank in Switzerland, but I am sure, you will be ...


1

It might have been a "bis-Strich" (I don't know the English term for that). In that case it was probably typeset not as a hyphen (-) but as an en-dash (–). If that is the case, "gestern–heute" would mean "gestern bis heute", "from yesterday to today". Generally, the "bis-Strich" is used to denote ranges, like "von 3–5 Uhr" (from 3 to 5 o'clock), or "Seite ...


1

Supplementary answer: For business settings I would suggest a longer sentence, like Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen herzlichst bedanken. or Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen für Ihr/e/n random positive attribute sehr herzlich bedanken.


1

Usually, Germans tend to express emotions in not too many words, so a simple Vielen Dank! would be the most common way to say that. And that is perfectly fine to do so, there is no need to do it more bloomy. I saw the difference when having a friend from the U.S. visiting me here and I just proposed to do a little show-around, and she used words like ...


1

I would go with Vielen, vielen Dank or Ich danke Ihnen sehr which expresses your special gratitude because you explicitly say that it is you who is thanking the other. However... I'm not sure that it is at all common to thank people a lot in business relations in Germany. It would be a weird bit too personal for my taste to express deep ...


1

To emphasize the very, you could say (Meinen) besten Dank. To add a more personal touch, herzlichen instead of besten works fine, in both cases you express above-average gratitude.



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