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7

The word nur has the same sense as only, in fact auch nur ein Mensch has the same meaning as only human. As in that 80s song by the Human League. In both languages it denotes that you're subject to foibles and fallibility. Just like that famous Latin saying, supposedly by Seneca errare humanum est meaning, of course To err is human. Someone ...


6

A quick Google returned gewöhnungsbedürftig - something one needs to get used to. As in Sushi is an acquired taste to Der Genuss von Sushi is gewöhnungsbedürftig Another suggestion was für Kenner - which really means for connoisseurs. Not quite sure about that one, maybe someone can suggest a phrase where you would use acquired taste in English ...


5

It might not perfectly fit what you want but I can think of Wartenummer (or just Nummer) as a commonly used version. It means queue waiting number and I think it comes from the number on the ticket which is assigned to you. Update A word for the actual ticket is Wartemarke as used on the website of a company producing such queuing solutions ...


4

In the stricter sense, it actually means, that the party with the Bringschuld is obliged to do something, e. g. deliver a payment. In the next step this generalized to other subjects as well, for instance information. In your example it was blurred further to simply indicate, who has to take initiative next. So the nearest English counterpiece of Du hast die ...


4

"Bringschuld" can also be used to determine who is obliged to take initiative - In your example, this would be the intended meaning (It is, however, quite a bit arguable whether this was indeed the right choice of words) Trump sees himself not obliged to do the first steps to re-unite the Republican party, but rather sees that with his opponents.


4

You cannot translate that to Er schaut auf jene herab, die er besser als ist - it's not grammatical. One might translate that to Er schaut auf jene herab, die schlechter sind als er. but I'm afraid that this would slightly change the meaning - while you can say "besser" to indicate a general superiority (higher social status, better educated, richer, more ...


4

In English, you suggested a plain description of who you are: It’s (my name), from that time we were (bla bla bla)... In German, I would pretty much suggest the same. You are correct in that it is cannot be translated literally (the same applies to this is); instead, you would simply write Ich bin (mein Name), ... Note that I would rather write ...


4

Valid: "Er/sie/es hat sich an den Geschmack gewöhnt." "Er/sie/es ist auf den Geschmack gekommen." This is not used in German: "Einen Geschmack lernen" "Einen Geschmack erwerben"


3

Both Wir haben (heute) den dritten Oktober. and Es ist der dritte Oktober. / Heute ist der dritte Oktober. are common. There is no semantic difference between the two phrases.


3

I think it depends on the original meaning of the English sentence. If it refers to the social or professional status, I would translate it like that: Er schaut auf jene herab, die unter ihm stehen. (in German, unter jemandem stehen is a common phrase to express social or professional status differences, besides the usual meaning of designating where an ...


3

"Backpfeife" = "a slap"; "Gesicht" = "face"; so the literal translation would be "Slapface". Meaning: somebody is so ugly that he should be slapped. But it has other meanings depending on the context and region. Similar words: Gesichtsgrätsche


3

First off, note that both words are not used a lot in colloquial. These are rather formal words. However, in this case, as so often, it's important to understand how the prefixes an- and be- affect the meaning. Admittedly, it's hard to grasp for be-. But basically the prefixes are the opposites to aus- and ent-. The word pair an-/aus- is pretty simple. ...


2

"Ankleiden" is the action of actually dressing up - From naked to fully in clothes. Mainly used in the reflexive form, but you can also dress up someone else. Works only for actual clothing. "Bekleiden" has the general meaning of "to cover" - Can be used for putting someone else into clothing, i.e dressing up someone else Describing the action that ...


2

They are not exact synonyms. For example, in figural speech, you can "ein Amt bekleiden" (hold an office) but you cannot "ein Amt ankleiden". Ankleiden means the act of putting on a dress. (change from undressed to dressed) Bekleiden is rather used figuratively ("ein Amt bekleiden") or in the form "mit etwas bekleidet sein" (to wear something).


2

In professional, written correspondence (letters, emails), I would not mention my name ("Ich bin...") in the text at all. I generally would consider this an Americanism (even in the UK I do not hear this very frequently). It has a rather unpleasant ring to it, and mainly reminds me of a bad sales pitch where some one tries to suck up to you. Also, it does ...


2

Something like: Ich bin's, der < Name>. Weisst du noch, wir sind damals < bla bla bla> More formal, there's always: Ich bin < Name>. Wissen Sie noch, wir sind damals < bla bla bla> Edit: Another formal form could be: Vielleicht koennen Sie sich noch erinnern, wir sind damals < bla bla bla> Translated Perhaps you can ...


2

Bissig relates to the verb "beissen" - So it's actually biting. "Böss" should be "böse" - so "bad", or "evil" (your "naughty" is not wrong, though) The whole thing, provided it relates to animals, as you said, thus is best translated to biting and bad In relation to humans, the translation would probably be a bit different, like snappy and evil ...


2

As long as you need to stick to those exact sentences you cannot. But ich möchte etwas essen to replace Ich will essen and ich muss einkaufen as Ich will Essen should do the trick. It sounds quite weird to use Essen in this sentence as it begs the question und dann? - basically what 'what do you want to do with it?'.


1

I guess (also from the "bissig und bös" question) the poem you're translating is Yvan Goll's "Der Panama-Kanal". "gier und gar" actually is not an idiom in German, and a literal translation along the lines of greed and cooked doesn't make any sense - not even to a native speaker. gar has a meaning in some southern German dialects and Austrian German of ...


1

In the KJV the verse is Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak. In the NIV it's Watch and pray so that you will not fall into temptation. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak. So, it's clear here that Wachen is watching, not waking. The German Luther bible has Wachet ...


1

Today, the originally referred bible text reads as Wacht und betet, damit ihr nicht in Versuchung geratet. Der Geist ist willig, aber das Fleisch ist schwach. So "wachen" is not so much to be understood as "stay awake", which would be the literal translation, but rather "stay alert and pray, so that you don't yield to temptation"


1

Both versions are correct and good German, and you can use both to translate “There is no way back”. But there are subtile differences: Es gibt keinen Weg zurück. is a more verbatim translation. It respects the grammar and word order of the English original. Here you have almost a word-to-word translation. The literal word-to-word translation back to ...


1

The first example probably needs the information on who is walking, and I would not force that into passive. If you say "Es wird zum Supermarkt gegangen" it sounds like you stress the "walking" part (e.g, as opposed to driving) and that you order others to do it. Wir gehen zum Supermarkt. We'll go to the supermarket. The 2nd example, "Es wird ...


1

The phrase literally means ownership instead of rent. It’s hard to tell without further context, but you may have seen an offer for buying a home, combined with a loan. In that case, you would pay a certain amount regularly for the next ten or fifteen or twenty years until you have paid back the loan and the home is yours.



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