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6

Keep case-sensitive as a foreign word, or use a ‎supporting sentence instead of a participle construction ("wobei Groß- und Kleinschreibung unterschieden wird"). As usual, the best actual choice depends on the context. In general, you can find examples on linguee.de. I've never seen a German term for this. For your example I'd write: Wie bei allen ...


6

Just change the über to darüber and change the position of ist and it works: Heute spreche ich darüber, warum es eine gute Idee ist, Deutsch zu lernen. Alternativeley, you could say: Heute spreche ich über die Frage, warum es eine gute Idee ist, Deutsch zu lernen. (Today I will talk about the question why...) Heute erläutere ich die Frage, ...


5

Well yes, most of the main clause is omitted, presumably because it would have to repeat what has just been said by another speaker. A contrived example: – Man klettert nicht nachts um drei Uhr auf Apfelbäume. – Da, wo ich herkomme, schon. (= Da, wo ich herkomme, macht man das schon. = Da, wo ich herkomme, klettert man schon nachts um drei Uhr auf ...


5

In this scenario, context would be used to differentiate the two. There really isn't a way to decide between ihre as their and ihre as her. In fact, if it weren't written down, you would equally be able to say that sentence translates to "you are taking your clothes from me." If I were speaking and what I was trying to say was ambiguous, I would phrase the ...


4

English only has two degrees of demonstrativeness: We can do it. versus We can do that. (or: this; they are on the same level of emphasis) (I feel that we can do it conveys the purpose of the sentence better. The main discussion point is not the verb used, anyway; and changing the verb does not change what it or that mean.) German, on the other ...


4

[I hope an answer in German is fine; in a nutshell: you can try a neologism, but there is no intuitive good one.] Es gibt m.W. tatsächlich keinen etablierten „deutscheren“ Begriff für case-[in]sensitive, also für die Unterscheidung von Groß- und Kleinbuchstaben. Man könnte allerdings einen Neologismus bilden: Von bspw. context-sensitive wissen wir, dass ...


4

This sounds a little too literally translated from English and a little clunky. I would rather say in German: Es ist eine beeindruckende Fähigkeit eine andere Sprache zu sprechen. The literal translation of to have sounds very not German.


3

It is hard to translate directly and the meaning in both sentences is a bit different. The first sentence would best be translated as "But the trend to wear stylish headgear persits." In German "Der Trend zu/zur/zum s.th." is used like some sort of synonym, shortening the sentence by hiding the verb which will be conveyed by the context and only using the ...


2

"Beste/Herzliche/Liebe Grüße an dich und deine ganze Familie" "Beste/Herzliche/Liebe Grüße" are more personal than "Viele Grüße". I think, "Liebe Grüße" is with friends always ok. "Tausend Küsse (an euch)" is OK for very close friends or for areas where kisses on the cheeks are a normal way to greet someone. "Von Herzen alles Gute für dich ...


2

There are a lot of variants possible. I would say "Viele Grüße auch an Deine Familie" or "Viele Grüße an Dich und Deine Familie" or "Viele Grüße an die ganze Familie". The last one would be short and include both: her and her family. To have it with more "english love": "Liebe Grüße ..."


2

Der zweite Teil qualifizert die Adjektive echt und rein. Also "echt nach der Herkunft" (true according to/in terms of heritage), "rein nach dem Lebensstil/der Art, wie ihr Leben geführt wird" usw. Das lässt offen, ob es "echt in Bezug auf die Herkunft" (Aspekt) oder "echt durch die Herkunft" (Grund) ist. Ich weiß nicht, was die beste englische Übersetzung ...


2

Without any further context, my suggestions are: Forschung ein Teil der Forschung manche/einige Forschungsprojekte (see below) Rationale: As I mentioned in a comment, the plural Forschungen sounds strange to me. After thinking about it some more, I think it is mainly because the expression eine Forschung does not make much sense. While the word ...


2

zusammentragen has the following meaning: von verschiedenen Stellen herbeischaffen und zu einem bestimmten Zweck sammeln (source: Duden.de) Translated into english: collecting from different places for a specific purpose. Collating includes collecting and combining information such as texts or data (regarding to Oxford Dictionaries). Thus the ...


2

Observation: All text processors at hand use one of these or close variants. If in search of a click box label within a search dialog I find a ≠ A quite international and hard to beat. There is of course no guarantee, to find a phrase with similar elegance for any concept in two different languages. While lower case and upper case strongly point in ...


1

Die Sprachen, bei denen der größte Aufwand getrieben wurde, einen Übersetzer zu entwickeln. Also Englisch.


1

As a German native i would say: 'Alles Liebe für Dich und Deine Familie' which is more personal than 'Liebe Grüße...' and still different from meaning romantic love.


1

I feel "Viele Grüße" still sounds pretty flat and upstage and does not come close to "Sending love to you" but rather to "Kind regards" or similar. I recommend in ascending strength: Dir und Deiner Familie alles Gute Dir und Deiner Familie alles Liebe Ich wünsche Dir und deiner Familie liebe Grüße Liebe Grüße an Dich und deine Familie


1

If you are greeted in English, it is considered polite to answer in English. Therefore both of the German options in your question are out of place.



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