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3

The verb used in this phrase is zurücktreten It is a separable verb, so it often is splitted into »zurück« (»back«) and »treten« (»to step«), but this to step back often has transferred meanings: Der Politiker tritt vom Amt zurück. The politician resigns from office. Der Papst trat zurück. The pope abdicated. Nach der Flutwelle ...


1

I see many answers stating that den Kindern is the object and der Besuch is the subject, but that might seem confusing to English speakers when translating. I would suggest the following English version of the sentence: The children enjoyed their visit to the planetarium. Which has almost the same structure — most notably, the positions of the children ...


8

For the composition rules: 1 and 2 are ok. Case 1 is the normal choice in general, but you would prefer 2 over 1 if it leads to better readability, e.g. in cases of an unusual, unexpected composition. I think you already know this, because you linked to Hyphen for compound nouns: Mathe-Wettbewerb or Mathewettbewerb?, and the answers there explain it quite ...


2

Both translations are sentences, that no native speaker would use. Ich gucke TV abends. First thing to note is, that the verb »gucken« is not used in the complete German spoken Area. It is unusual in Austria, and - as I guess - also in Bavaria, but since I live in Austria I can't say much about the usage in different areas or Germany or Switzerland. But ...


4

The Yandex version is badly wrong. It replaced the verb fernsehen with the noun Fernsehen, either meaning the process of watching TV or the TV itself. Google probably chose the structure it did because it doesn’t translate idiomatically but rather literally, and that option is more literal (but less idiomatic). The verb fernsehen, as you noticed, is ...


3

Anmk. or Anm is an abbreviation for Anmerkung, which in this context should be an explanatory note / remark / note. 10 Anm. 1 means Remark Nr. 10 Paragraph 1


5

Anmk. is Anmerkung (remark), also abbreviated Anm. Then, for instance Anmk. is the 23rd remark. As side note: Anmk. seems to be replaced by Anm., as this ngram suggests.


1

Das kann doch nicht wahr sein! (That can't possibly be true!) communicates a level of astonishment that is included in "You've got to be kidding me!" Verarschen has an implication of making fun of the person. (Making them look like an ass.) If you look on Leo you will also find "veralbern".


6

My proposal avoids harsh words: Du nimmst mich wohl auf den Arm?!


3

“You got to be kidding me!”: “Du machst wohl Scherze!”, or vulgar: “Du willst mich wohl verarschen!” You can translate “kidding” with “Scherz”.


0

Though it isn't a real equivalent to handwavy I think in some cases you might be able to use the expression über den Daumen gepeilt.


5

Depending on the nature of the handwaving, one of the following may fit: Ein salopper Beweis – It’s what I prefer to use in such a situation, though I usually apply it to certain steps of a proof and not the proof as a whole. It particular fits proof that omit technical details and apply to intuition, visualisation or examples. Ein formloser Beweis – A ...


1

To me, the would puts emphasis on the temporary nature and the start of the habit. The best translation for this I can think of is Er hatte es sich zur Gewohnheit gemacht, jeden Tag an den Strand zu gehen. or Er hatte sich angewöhnt, jeden Tag an den Strand zu gehen. This stresses the temporary nature better than Er hatte die Angewohnheit / Es ...


9

This has nothing to do with colloquial level, but is simply an additional meaning of a verb with a multitude of meanings. My Großes Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache offers (among others) these meanings straightening something, which was curled together, e. g. a map scroll, or a flag ( I guess this is the meaning you found) winding something up onto a roll, ...


3

I think "problems that have been raised by the battle" is okay, but I would suggest "problems that have been raised again by battle". What it means is that the problems have been there, but they somehow disappeared. Due to the battle the problems became current again.


7

Of course, the simple past can be translated as Er ging jeden Tag zum Strand. Expressing the habitual past isn't that easy. You can use the verb "pflegen" to express the habitual aspect: Er pflegte jeden Tag zum Strand zu gehen. However, this is quite elevated style; you wouldn't normally say that, it rather fits into a novel. As an alternative, ...


6

One very common way to talk about habits is the word "immer". Thomas hat sich immer selber Essen mitgebracht. Thomas would bring his own food all the time. However, that doesn't work if it's only an occasional habit or (as in your example) if there is a second, more specific indication of time. Ich bin immer jeden Tag zum Strand gegangen... ...


6

Zu genehmigende Projektbuchungen is correct as it is. It is a present participle ("genehmigend") combined with "zu" (this combination expresses that something needs to be done), and used like an adjective (which is why it is inflected according to the following noun, "Projektbuchungen", by adding an "e"). More information and examples for this are ...


3

Some ways would be: Respekt über alles More or less a literal translation. It sounds quite harsh though, and has an unfavorable connotation to it. Respekt geht vor This is a bit softer. Vorgehen has two meanings in german. (i) Moving at the head of a group, or (ii) something being preferred over something else. In this case it would be (ii). Respekt hat ...


1

I have seen the adjective hemdsärmelig used in this case.


5

When I was studying maths at university, "Beweis durch Händewedeln" was in use, but that describes a very very vague "proof" in the sense of "it can be easily seen that theorem 1.2 applies together with lemma 2.3, and the details are left as an exercise for the reader". For "proofs" the appeal to intuition or common sense, I'd use "Beweis durch Anschauung" ...


8

There seems to be no equally used German counterpart as I have often heard (and used) the English “hand waving” while conversing about mathematics in German.


6

Es ist nicht ein Ausdruck, sondern es sind zwei Alternativen: wegen und um ... willen. Also etwa wegen des Gewitters oder um des Friedens willen.


8

It depends. The main thing is, that some English translations do not render properly the Kantian jargon, and thus, they need to explicitly tell you what they mean with a certain term. This can get ambiguous and usually the term is instead, more often than not, translated via more difficult English terms, or even via sentences instead of single terms. The ...


6

As Feirell explained, “gerade” means “currently” or “at the moment”. It's obviously intended to render the distinction between “The men cook” and “The men are cooking” in German but it's not quite right to suggest that this is the only correct translation. Depending on the context, “Die Männer kochen” can be a perfectly fine translation for “The men are ...


2

Statt Ureinwohner, das besser im Kontext aktiver Kolonisation verwendet wird, also für Nordamerika je nach Region von 1500 bis 1900, kann man alternativ bilden: urkanadische jugendliche Straftäter uramerikanische jugendliche Straftäter Urkanadier / Uramerikaner sind vermutlich Neologismen, aber einigermaßen aus sich heraus verständlich und ...


4

First thing that came to mind was eingeboren. However, I found the following note in the Duden entry for Eingeborener: Besonderer Hinweis Die Bezeichnung Eingeborener wird zunehmend als diskriminierend empfunden. Neutralere Ausweichformen für die Verwendung im Plural sind Urbevölkerung bzw. einheimische Bevölkerung, Ureinwohnerinnen und Ureinwohner ...


2

May be aboriginale jugendliche Straftäter would help. If not, set Ureinwohner as the principal noun, and adjectivize Sträftäter: straffällige jugendliche Ureinwohner To the OP's question to this answer, you can see how in German the term aboriginal dominated and from the early 90s on, indigen dominates. (Of course, this doesn't mean they mean ...


-1

Whatsoever = in keiner Hinsicht. Es besteht kein Problem in keiner Hinsicht.


8

As a half-German (but only beginner-level speaker since moving to Germany a few years ago), I would say überhaupt is probably formally correct for whatsoever. In a more informal context, I would probably use the wonderful expression gar as in "Es gibt gar kein Problem." I like it, because it sounds authentic, and would definitely use it in speaking. It's ...


1

There is no universal translation of go. Los is quite informal, so I’d be hesitant to use it in most contexts. Might be okay when entering a url. If possible, use a description of the action that will be triggered. For example Suchen, Verarbeitung starten or Registrierung abschließen. For the last step of a wizard, Microsoft uses Fertigstellen, for ...


5

It's probably closest to the truth to say that there is not one translation that works in all context. In essence, the word is an intensifier. It makes a statement sound more extreme by underlining that really all choices have been considered. If its scope is more general and it can be replaced by "at all", then "überhaupt" is the best match. There is no ...


-2

This theorem would work for any dimension whatsoever. As said in the comments, that's not scientific language or at least not the common one. If the theorem is proven to work on one specific dimension or on a single one and you want to express that it also works any other dimension, too or could be generalised to multiple dimensions, you'd use the term ...


4

Whatsoever can be translated as sowieso, ohnehin or überhaupt. Es gibt sowieso/ohnehin/überhaupt kein Problem. Ich zweifle sowieso/ohnehin/überhaupt nicht an seiner Arbeit. Das Theorem funktioniert sowieso/ohnehin/überhaupt in jeder Dimension. Another option is wie auch immer: Wie auch immer, [rest of sentence] Sowieso has more a meaning like ...


2

The meaning of whatsoever may vary in English (probably a slang word). There is no problem whatsoever. I have no doubt on his work whatsoever. This theorem would work for any dimension whatsoever. German, however, has rather explicit expressions: Es gibt soweit keine Probleme. Ich zweifle kein bisschen an seiner Arbeit. Dieser ...


3

Since the whatsoever in the last example only adds emphasis, you can just omit it in the translation. Der Satz würde in jeder Dimension funktionieren. (The word funktionieren is somewhat colloquial in this context.) Now if you want to add a similar emphasis you can say: Der Satz würde in jeder beliebigen Dimension funktionieren. Der Satz würde ...


12

In most cases in physics, act on sth. is translated by auf etw. wirken. So the phrase is: Der Impulsoperator p wirkt auf das Ket |ψ>. For example, in this Wikipedia article you can read: In der Impulsdarstellung wirkt der Impulsoperator multiplikativ auf Impulswellenfunktionen [...]. Another possible construction I can think of is auf etw. ...


4

Im ganzen Satz: Dem Finder winkt eine Belohnung.


3

This is somewhat more related to Deutsche Post than to the German language. Most post offices are franchising partners (i.e. not working directly for Deutsche Post) and often saying things like Wir tragen keine Schuld, die Post hat den Fehler begangen. While this is unwanted by the Post, the franchising partners are differentiating themselves from the ...


2

It wasn't wrong to use "Sie" in this situation, but to understand it the way you meant it, it would have required the clerk to see himself as a representative of the company he is working for, instead of being addressed personally (which is the "normal" function of a "verb + Sie" constructionin a direct talk). Maybe this was too demanding for him (wouldn't ...


3

"gerade" just means "at the moment"


2

The original word fomulus in the book is a malapropism for famulus. Duden: Fa|mu|lus, der; -, -se u. …li [lat. famulus = Diener, Gehilfe, H. u.] (veraltet): Famulant. Student, der einem Hochschullehrer assistiert. So the translator to English chose something similar. In my Spanish translation they just write fomulus, and one is left ...


4

I assume that the title was changed for purely poetic reasons. The original English title has a regular meter (unstressed, stressed, unstressed, stressed, ...), but the literal translation into German "Die sehr hungrige Raupe" does not. By choosing the less literal translation "Die kleine Raupe Nimmersatt" (i.e, "the little caterpillar Always-Hungry"), it ...


11

To be precise, "Die kleine Raupe Nimmersatt" doesn't translate to "The very hungry caterpillar". The English title is the original one, and the German one is a translation. I'd say the translator allowed himself a certain degree of freedom, as it is common in literature. "Nimmersatt" is a nice word to express "very hungry" very concisely. In fact, it goes ...


2

The trick is in the word Nimmersatt, which translates to "always hungry"; but in this case is also the name of the caterpillar. Klein, of course, means small and is the adjective to Raupe. The German title doesn't use or need the very, because that's implicitly in the name of Nimmersatt. Your translation "The little caterpillar Hungry" is literally ...


2

We definitely can't give you concise directions on the genealogy of German surnames within the scope of this site dedicated to language. Nevertheless some hints on the language aspect of this name may help: Ziese f. / Ziesen pl. This used to be a name for taxes in Preussia, similar to the sales taxes today. It is unclear as to why the suffix -(n)is was ...


5

»Again!« is not a sentence. It is a word with an exclamation mark. But you can interpret it as an ellipsis, which is the shortened version of a full sentence. This sentence might be: Do it again! This is the verbatim translation: Mach es wieder! But while the english sentence has a built-in but invisible »now« included, this german ...


9

Verkehr = traffic Um ungefähr 17 Uhr ist der Verkehr auf den Straßen sehr stark. At about 5 pm the traffic on the road is very heavy. Verkehr = communication Ich stehe in ständigem E-Mail-Verkehr mit dem Chef. I am in a constant e-mail communication with the boss. Verkehr = circulation Niemand weiß genau, vielen Falschgeld derzeit im ...


2

Yes. It can mean traffic or transport, but also association, communication, dealings (in a commercial sense) or intercourse (in all meanings of the term).



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