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4

In computer science and software development, the corrrect translation of "state" would be "Zustand". However, this would sound very odd in german in your specific situation. The cause for that is that "state" is a poor choice of words in english for this to begin with (properties or attributes would have been much better). I would go with "Attribut" or ...


1

In this case, what the cluster of attributes describes is a Kundenbeziehung . The last checkbox refers to part of the Vertragsstatus.


5

I would go with Kundenattribute


0

In addition to RRZ Europe's excellent Kennzeichen, I'd like to propose Facette, facet. A customer can have many of those, and each of them defines the customer in some way that's orthogonal to all the other facets..


5

I would use something like Kennzeichen or "flag"


8

Ich would translate that by Kategorie. Zustand suggests a time dependency, Status would work, but is somewhat blurry, State has far too many meanings and would require a concise definition. Alternatively a compound could be used, as e. g. Kundenstatus To reflect the somewhat shifted focus in the edited question: Here also the following can be ...


1

I would hesitate describing this as a state. I think this is better suited to be something like additional information. This would translate to zusätzliche Informationen. I don't know your semantics but it seems to me, that one customer can have multiple states at once (eg. bad payer and important customer). This means that a customer would have multiple ...


3

I've never heard Gitarrenstimmer like gnasher says. I've always used Gitarrenstimmgerät which would translate to guitar tune gadget. Source: Having played classical guitar for 11 years.


-1

Gitarrenstimmer. Gitarrenstimmer.


4

In short, no, Weltschmerz is not untranslatable, but it’s often rather hard to translate well into English. The real question is either whether there are any words or phrases in any language that are untranslatable or whether there are words in a particular language (e.g. German Weltschmerz) that have no direct translation or cognate in a certain other ...


0

Gier probably means it is somehow messy, here is an example for ships that are tumbling around: http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/gieren_schwanken On first read the "nothing left", @tofro mentions, made sense to me, like it describes some wasteland. But the whole "gier and gar" seems to be related to Fieberhauch, not to the floor. But never heard that ...


-1

What about 'world weariness'? I think it describes it pretty well.


9

I guess (also from the "bissig und bös" question) the poem you're translating is Yvan Goll's "Der Panama-Kanal". "gier und gar" actually is not an idiom in German, and a literal translation along the lines of greed and cooked doesn't make any sense - not even to a native speaker. gar has a meaning in some southern German dialects and Austrian German of ...


1

I never heard of it before and your post is the only hit in an online search... Maybe you mean "ganz und gar". That just means "completely", "totally", ... "without leftovers".


3

Bissig relates to the verb "beissen" - So it's actually biting. "Böss" should be "böse" - so "bad", or "evil" (your "naughty" is not wrong, though) The whole thing, provided it relates to animals, as you said, thus is best translated to biting and bad In relation to humans, the translation would probably be a bit different, like snappy and evil ...


7

It might not perfectly fit what you want but I can think of Wartenummer (or just Nummer) as a commonly used version. It means queue waiting number and I think it comes from the number on the ticket which is assigned to you. Update A word for the actual ticket is Wartemarke as used on the website of a company producing such queuing solutions ...


9

The word nur has the same sense as only, in fact auch nur ein Mensch has the same meaning as only human. As in that 80s song by the Human League. In both languages it denotes that you're subject to foibles and fallibility. Just like that famous Latin saying, supposedly by Seneca errare humanum est meaning, of course To err is human. Someone ...


3

In professional, written correspondence (letters, emails), I would not mention my name ("Ich bin...") in the text at all. I generally would consider this an Americanism (even in the UK I do not hear this very frequently). It has a rather unpleasant ring to it, and mainly reminds me of a bad sales pitch where some one tries to suck up to you. Also, it does ...


4

In English, you suggested a plain description of who you are: It’s (my name), from that time we were (bla bla bla)... In German, I would pretty much suggest the same. You are correct in that it is cannot be translated literally (the same applies to this is); instead, you would simply write Ich bin (mein Name), ... Note that I would rather write ...


2

Something like: Ich bin's, der < Name>. Weisst du noch, wir sind damals < bla bla bla> More formal, there's always: Ich bin < Name>. Wissen Sie noch, wir sind damals < bla bla bla> Edit: Another formal form could be: Vielleicht koennen Sie sich noch erinnern, wir sind damals < bla bla bla> Translated Perhaps you can ...


4

Valid: "Er/sie/es hat sich an den Geschmack gewöhnt." "Er/sie/es ist auf den Geschmack gekommen." This is not used in German: "Einen Geschmack lernen" "Einen Geschmack erwerben"


-1

Er fand endlich eine Frau, mit der er den Rest seines Lebens zu verbringen vermochte.


6

A quick Google returned gewöhnungsbedürftig - something one needs to get used to. As in Sushi is an acquired taste to Der Genuss von Sushi is gewöhnungsbedürftig Another suggestion was für Kenner - which really means for connoisseurs. Not quite sure about that one, maybe someone can suggest a phrase where you would use acquired taste in English ...


4

In the stricter sense, it actually means, that the party with the Bringschuld is obliged to do something, e. g. deliver a payment. In the next step this generalized to other subjects as well, for instance information. In your example it was blurred further to simply indicate, who has to take initiative next. So the nearest English counterpiece of Du hast die ...


4

"Bringschuld" can also be used to determine who is obliged to take initiative - In your example, this would be the intended meaning (It is, however, quite a bit arguable whether this was indeed the right choice of words) Trump sees himself not obliged to do the first steps to re-unite the Republican party, but rather sees that with his opponents.


1

Both versions are correct and good German, and you can use both to translate “There is no way back”. But there are subtile differences: Es gibt keinen Weg zurück. is a more verbatim translation. It respects the grammar and word order of the English original. Here you have almost a word-to-word translation. The literal word-to-word translation back to ...



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