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33

Absolutely; an adult is still someone’s Kind in exactly the same way as in English. Just two examples I quickly found via a web search: Vor allem diese sonderbare Hilflosigkeit, wenn die eigenen Kinder fordern, dass man ihnen als Erwachsene auf Augenhöhe begegnen soll … (Kester Schlenz, Stern) Meine erwachsenen Kinder vertragen sich einfach nicht ...


29

kaufen Same as buy in English. Works for pretty much every situation, from chewing gum to real estate to bribery ;) Needs an accusative object, e.g. Ich kaufe einen Apfel. Er hat ein Auto gekauft. einkaufen This leans more towards shopping ("einkaufen gehen" = "to go shopping"). As a noun it is also often used in the context of a corporate ...


28

I have never connected dingsbums with bumsen. I don't think this connection is usually made. To me dingsbums is a perfectly fine word to use, albeit very colloquial and hence not necessarily appropriate in serious situations. It's only rude if you keep referring to somebody as dingsbums whose name you should know. ;-) Dingsda, dingenskirchen and ...


28

Don't try to use the old spelling if you are a foreign student. Partial use of the old orthography will endear you to no one. Neither is it likely that the occasional "daß" will make you look out of date. Many people have continued to use "daß" while not applying most of the other concerned old orthography rules because most people never knew them. But the ...


28

In my opinion: Yes, you should learn about the genitive. While it's use apparently is on the decline and there are many "substitutions", you should not expect it to disappear totally in the next decades. Your cousin has a point in noting that at least in some regions (influence of dialect) and in spoken language more than in written (more informal) some ...


27

Yes. A common small-talk topic is “Wohin fahrt ihr dieses Jahr in den Urlaub?” and it is perfectly ok to answer “Wir fahren nach Island” even if you have your flight tickets booked already. Same holds, of course, for London and Paris.


26

In my experience, "ein paar" has not much to do with the number two, it's more likely to be interpreted as "a few" or "a bunch" as opposed to "all" or even "many". So if you're saying "Gib mir doch bitte mal ein paar Zettel.", you're requesting a few more, but not all of them (probably leaving enough for everyone else).


24

In der langen Version würde man sagen: Pfüat di Gott was so viel heißt wie "Gott behüte Dich". In der originalen Reihenfolge (Kommentar teylyn) "Behüt Dich Gott", verkürzt zu B'hüt di Gott. Nachzulesen im Bairischen Wörterbuch.


23

IMO there are two basic uses for cute: young animals and humans, or adult humans which you feel attracted to / would like to date. I will try and explain the usage of the more common meanings and also give some idea about subtle differences (this may be a little bit subjective). niedlich: cute as in a cute kitten. You would feel a little bit protective ...


22

"Mir" hat oft die Bedeutung von "für mich". Sing mir das vor! Schreib mir das auf! etc. Mit einer Negation bedeutet es hier, dass du mir zuliebe nicht einschlafen sollst, oder dass ich mich dafür verantwortlich fühlen würde oder dafür verantwortlich gemacht werden würde (wie auch im englischen Beispielsatz). Das ganze wird gerne auch passiv-aggressiv ...


22

I personally use both words randomly to agree with what others say. Neither of these is rude or slang. In my opinion they can be used in a formal (business) discussion without any concerns.


20

Ich bin nicht der Bademeister, ich bin ein Gast. translates to I'm not the pool attendant. I'm a guest. while Ich bin kein Bademeister, ich bin Gast. translates to I'm no pool attendant, I'm guest. The difference, from my understanding, is that at least in this particular exception the first sentence could be said by a pool assistant ...


20

Unfortunately another area where little understood English terms have taken the cake. Geek: originally a person biting heads off of small animals The subspecies technology geek is what is known in German as der Geek Indirectly related to jeck (often heard during carnival season) - fool, jester ... Reminds one of der Elf/die Elfe while the German word ...


17

"Entschuldigen" is the verb form. "Entschuldigung" is the noun form. EDIT--additional information: If you are asking about the difference between "das Entschuldigen" and "die Entschuldigung", then this has to do with a grammar rule rather than just a dictionary entry definition. "Das Entschuldigen" is an example of a gerund (Gerundium), which is simply ...


17

ein paar just means "some", "a few", "a couple of". Ich muss noch ein paar Dinge erledigen. (I need to take care of a couple of things.) It has no connection to the number two.


16

"Kein(e)(s,r)" is used to negate undefined nouns or pronouns: Ich habe keine Wohnung. (instead of: Ich habe nicht eine Wohnung) Keiner sah es. (instead of: nicht einer sah es) You can, however, use the second expression (in brackets) if you want to emphasize that there is not even one thing of a kind: Nicht einer meiner Freunde kam zur Party. ...


16

In the end both mean the same. The usage of "Jägermeister" is obsolete. Nowadays when saying "Jägermeister" you usually refer to the alcoholic drink. "Weidmann" or "Waidmann" is the technical term used by hunter and is also well known in "Weidmannsheil" and "Weidmannsdank", a greeting. The informal term is just "Jäger"


16

Der Eindruck täuscht nicht – diese „afinite Konstruktion“ findet man nur noch sehr selten. Nach Sekundärliteratur konnte ich bisher nur oberflächlich suchen. Google Books liefert zu afiniter Konstruktion schon mal ein paar Treffer. Admoni geht in „Die Entwicklung des Satzbaus in der deutschen Literatursprache des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts“, Berlin 1987, ab S. ...


16

Both words are standard German, but I think "genau" is used more often in small talk. As Jan says in his comment, if you're on the receiving end of a discission, it is quite sufficient to say "genau" at the appropriate points. To me, "stimmt" would sound less natural in this context (but that might indeed be a regional thing). For me, "stimmt" is connected ...


16

These words mean the same thing ("to sweep", "to clean dryly with a broom"), but are used in different regions. Kehren (or variants thereof, such as zusammenkehren) can mostly be heard in southern Germany and Austria, whereas fegen is commonly used in the North. Oddly enough, the Swiss say wischen for "to sweep", which a German would (mis-)understand as ...


16

Perception of your writing The majority of the people are used to the new spelling now, so I'd suggest writing in new spelling simply because it would appear strange to not use it. Most people should know you are no native and therefore they'll expect you to write in the new orthography. As for those minority using the old spelling nevertheless, it's their ...


16

Don't compare German to English. In German we're not talking about direct and indirect objects. What we concern about are cases: nominative accusative dative genitive The question "Wie geht es dir?" is an example of dative. And the dative form of du is dir. In many cases you can consider the German dative case being an indirect object and the German ...


16

"Müssen" in German can also imply direction - the usage you are expecting is as auxiliary verb, like "können", "dürfen", "sollen": Etwas tun müssen Gehen müssen But you may use it without any verb to suggest movement without specifying the form (going, driving, flying, whatever) because it is important to be there, not how you got there. Ich muss ...


15

Dazu steht im Zwiebelfisch: Die Wendung "meines Wissens" in der Bedeutung von "soviel ich weiß" steht ohne die Präposition "nach". Es heißt: "Meines Wissens war Peter der Große Zar von Russland", nicht "Meines Wissens nach war Peter der Große Zar von Russland." Dasselbe gilt für den Genitiv von "Erachten", auch hier heißt es nicht "meines ...


15

It is still used. Just not as much. You need it, if there is no info about time in the sentence, when you want to emphasize your resolve, or when the present tense could be misunderstood as a general statement of habit.... which is basically because no time is indicated. Ich werde das nicht länger dulden. In New York werde ich sooooo shoppen gehen, ...


15

Standardsprachlich werden die mit da zusammengesetzten Pronominaladverbien nicht durch andere Wörter voneinander getrennt. Die Trennung kommt allerdings umgangssprachlich, insbesondere in Norddeutschland, vor: da ist doch nichts bei da bin ich nicht für da hab ich was gegen ach, da kommt das her! da habe ich nicht mit gerechnet da richtet er ...


15

The usual word for that is he (often with a lengthened e and then spelt hee, heee, heeeeee or similar): He, kannst du mir sagen, wie spät es ist? Heee, was machen Sie denn da? There are also huhu and ey. Ey is often used when addressing someone who may be misbehaving, whereas huhu is normally reserved for positive contexts such as when helping a ...


14

In Germany the correct term is "Frühstück", nobody is using the term "Morgenessen" but in Switzerland the term "Morgenessen" is used. I have to admit that it would be consistent, though, because there are both "Mittagessen" and "Abendessen".


14

It is quite common to say akustisch nicht verstanden in contrast to inhaltlich nicht verstanden. The alternative would be nicht richtig gehört. Some native speakers might regard akustisch nicht verstanden as unnatural preferring nicht richtig gehört. For others it's the opposite. From a linguistic point of view, it's correct. It's a partial translation of ...


14

A neutral term would be ITler or, more German, EDVler, which is very broad. If people spend a lot of time with computers, they’re often called Computerfreak – I, however, don’t know whether it is still current. I know it from C64 times, when it was something special to have a computer.



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