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-1

"Kehren" and "fegen" both refer to "sweep" although they have somewhat different connotations. "Kehren" means "to turn around," which is something that you do when you are "sweeping." But I've also seen kehren used in other contexts, such as "dancing." "Fegen has more of the connotation of "cleaning." Sweeping is one form of cleaning, specifically of ...


5

"ff" means "[und] folgende", usually in references to pages, when you want to say "don't just look at that page but also a few pages after that": "Seite 300ff" can be pages 300 to 305. Without knowing the whole article, I would assume "Männer" refers to another section in that article (titled "Männer"), and "Männer ff" refers to that section and the next ...


1

There's no difference whatsoever. Vorhersagen is a little more common than voraussagen, not least because the weather forecast is usually Wettervorhersage. It's possible that there are further common collocations, but I wouldn't come up with any off the top of my head.


0

"voraussagen" is forecasting. A forecast tries to predict the future by extrapolating current data. "vorhersagen" is foretelling. Foretelling means telling someone the future without having clear data, or otherwise having obtained information by somewhat "occult" means. Basically the difference between "voraussagen" and "vorhersagen", is the difference ...


3

"Voraussagen" is a little bit more metaphysical than "vorhersagen". Similar to "prophecy" vs "prediction". You would "vorraussagen" the future but you would "vorhersagen" the weather.


-1

I know this is not exactly on topic, but it is a curious fact that in Yiddish the use of "es gibt" is considered a serious faus pas. A common acceptable alternative is: es gefinnt sich a buch... which of course roughly follows the German, but there are also: 'sis dâ a buch... (the â here indicates a vowel shift to o or u) 'sis dâ vorhan a buch... or ...


1

'Jenseits' can also mean 'beyond': 'Jenseits von Gut und Böse' => "Beyond Good and Evil', so I'd go with "beyond thought, wisdom hums" for your translation.


1

I believe your translation is pretty straight forward. To try to translate it differently might add complications that are not necessary and could eventually even cloud the meaning of what you try to say. The only correction I have is to remove the comma. Unless I am mistaken, in German you wouldn't put a comma there (see here: ...


-2

Ich habe gehört. (standard German) In Tirol, one would say something like Ich hob kaeth.


0

You do not differ in German. As ingmar wrote, we use the appropriate case on the subject and list the objects afterward. In your example: case = Dativ feminin, subject = Mädchen -> Dem Mädchen If you want to point the importance of different elements of your list, you choose the order exactly like that. There are no grammatical rules for that so the ...


2

We use cases, so order is less important. You use dative to indicate the person something is given to (dem Mädchen). The most common way of putting it would be: Ich habe dem Mädchen Eier und Schinken gegeben. Other versions are possible, though, if you want to highlight other parts of the phrase: Ich habe die Eier und den Schinken dem Mädchen ...


2

You have to distinguish between semi-reflexive verbs (Ich wasche mich/dich/sie...), and fully reflexive ones (Ich freue mich/dich/sie/...). Some reflexive verbs come with a dative sich. To find out whether those are fully or semi reflexive, try to replace sich with another dative pronoun: Das Kind merkt sich/dir/ihr alles. So sich merken is fully reflexive. ...


2

Both versions are possible, and they are equivalent. The Duden has a nice short article about this phenomenon.



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