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1

A good question, but difficult to answer. Duden has seen this problem by only saying beweisen and nachweisen are just variants. The normal word is beweisen. Nachweisen is typical for certain sectors such as chemistry and law and authorities. Authorities need a special Nachweis for the death of a person. It is a special document called "Sterbeurkunde". A ...


4

ab nun I never heard »ab nun«. I think it is correct, but rarely used. And since I never heard it, I am not able to tell what it should mean exactly. (I live in Austria, and here the word »nun« is much rarer used then in Germany, so when I say I did not hear this phrase, then this has not much to say.) ab sofort »Ab sofort« means »from this second on«. ...


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Ich will schlafen. I'd like to sleep. Ich will ein Kuscheltier haben. I'd like to have a stuffed animal. If you want something, you can go with "Ich will ... [verb]", or "Ich möchte ... [verb]". The other construct uses the "Ersatzinfinitv". But first things first. As you know, you use the "Partizip Perfekt" for the present perfect. Ich habe ...


4

First, beweisen is the term used in mathematics if you prove something. Second, it is also used if you prove yourself. In both cases, you cannot go with nachweisen. Now let's get to their overlapping meaning of proving something to be true by using facts, evidence. I don't think there's really a difference in meaning; however, you cannot always interchange ...


3

Well they mean almost the same but you will have to use them differently. Nachweisen always comes with something, which you have proven or somebody who you have proven to have done something. Der Wissenschaftler konnte die Existenz von Sauerstoff nachweisen. Der Polizist weist dem Dieb eine Straftat nach. Der Polizist beweist, dass der Dieb eine ...


4

Both sentences are fully correct and idiomatic and have roughly the same meaning. The strictly literal meanings are as follows: It might be fun to travel ... It must be fun to travel ... In the second case the literal translation happens to be correct because English uses exactly the same idiom in the same way. In the first case, the literal ...


0

Es dürfte lustig sein, in fremde Länder zu reisen. = It SHOULD be fun to travel to foreign countries. Es muss lustig sein, in fremde Länder zu reisen. = It MUST be fun to travel to foreign countries.


4

dürfen: to be free to do something, to be permitted to do something nicht dürfen: to be forbidden müssen: to have to, must Usually, that’s correct. Es muss … sein, on the other hand, expresses an (strong) assumption or opinion, not a clear statement. Es muss lustig sein, in fremde Länder zu reisen. roughly means I’m sure it’s fun to ...


6

The article-like forms look like articles but are in fact demonstrative pronouns. Apparantly, they also have a second name deictic pronouns, because they are usually used when pointing at someone/something (Greek δεῖξις, pointing). Which leads us directly to their usage: the use of der in the example is both adding emphasis and implicitly pointing at the ...



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