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2

Dativ und Akkusativ können mit oder ohne Flexionsendung auftreten (jemand[em], jemand[en]): Es fiel ihm schwer, jemand / jemandem zu widersprechen. (...) Der schwache Dativ jemanden ist nicht standardsprachlich: Nichts, was jemandem (nicht: jemanden) etwas bedeuten könnte. Im Akkusativ wird die endungslose Form oft vorgezogen: Haben Sie jemand ...


1

The word "stimmt" can be used for two purposes: As an expression that something is true: "Ist 1 + 1 2? Das stimmt!" to give a waiter a tip "Waiter: Das macht dann 14.99€. You: "15€, dass stimmt schon." "Stimmt" is casual. The main usage is the first use case. The less casual translation for "stimmt" is "korrekt", but "korrekt" can be only be used to say ...


6

"Wollen" expresses a (perhaps very) strong will to achieve something. Using it can make an aggressive impression and so it is rarely used in formal letters, but rather at a protest march or a heated debate. "Wir wollen mehr Gerechtigkeit für Arbeitslose!" "Ich will, dass du sofort aufhörst zu rauchen." "Möchten" is a polite way of expressing will and ...


3

Actually it’s simple for speakers of English, because there are simple, yet precise translations available: genau = exactly/precisely stimmt = correct/true The use cases in German may differ from the English language, but the meaning is very clear. Neither of them is an abbreviation of the other or a combination of both, as some comments state. ...


2

If you read something aloud (eg. a story for children, a poem, etc.) the punctuation marks of sentences indicate Lesepausen as locations to pause shortly from reading to make the structure of the sentence obvious to the listener. This helps to recognize insertions, side-notes, etc. I guess, that all other answers are correct as well (essentially "a break ...


3

My Mum is teaching in a primary School. After the 4th and before the 5th lesson, there is a so called "Lesepause", were the children have to read a Book from the "Lesekiste"(A box with children books in), for 20 minutes. May it helps, else Emanuel already gave an explanation about the meaning, just wanted to provide a practical example


1

Agree with Martin Büttner in the comments. It is most probably meant in the sense of Kaffeepause, where you are taking a break to drink coffee. Lesepause is when you take a break (Pause) to read (lesen) something. It is also possible to mean a break from reading like others suggest, but that doesn't feel right for me as a native speaker.


7

Technically, a "Lesepause" could be two things: a break for reading a break from reading Written on a book mark, it's likely intended to mean the latter. The book mark is kind of the objectified reading break. If we find a book with a book mark, we know that someone stopped reading there with the intention to come back later. The question whether it ...


2

"Lesepause" might mean that someone who reads a lot stops reading for some time for various reasons. His eyes might be tired or he wants to take off some time to think about what he has read. If it is written on a bookmark then the meaning might be: Here I stopped reading because I had to walk the dog. But it might also mean: time/a pause for reading and not ...


2

Etwaige Satzumstellungen ändern nichts an der Bedeutung der Beispiele mit den Hallenplätzen und den Keksen. In beiden Fällen liegt in meinen Augen ein inklusiver Gerbauch vor. Ihnen gemein ist, dass sie eine Menge gleicher Entitäten beschreiben. Das Objekt in bis auf den letzten Keks/Platz ist unbestimmt. Eine ausschließende Formulierung bedarf eines ...


9

These: Meiner Auffassung nach ist aus der Position im Satz keine Schlussfolgerung zu ziehen, ob es exklusive oder inklusive gemeint ist. Der einzige Unterschied, den die Stellung im Satz ausmacht, ist Betonung. Argumentation: Häufig ergibt sich die Bedeutung aus dem Kontext. Das Beispiel aus der anderen Antwort, kann nur auf eine Art und Weise verstanden ...


-2

Ja, die Bedeutung hängt im Allgemeinen von der Stellung im Satz ab. Wenn Du sagst "Bis auf...." ist es exklusiv, wodurch du eine Ausgrenzung des Objektes vornimmst. Wie Du sagtest: Bis auf den letzten Platz war die Halle voll. Das heißt, dass der letzte Platz nicht belegt war. Auf der anderen Seite, wenn bis auf mittig im Satz steht, ist es ...


1

"Bunt" literally means "multi-colored" or "variegated." Whether or not it is "neutral" depends largely on the social context. The "Anglo-Saxon" preference is for "uniformity." Under this ethos, attributes like "motley" or "variegated" aren't exactly virtues. That holds true for American English, British English, and German. In this regard, the English and ...


9

Well, bunt basically has three definitions: colorful varied, diverse disordered The English words I've provided as definitions are very spot-on; and though, they are quite general. Depending on context, you can find a better translation; however, you would certainly use a different word in German then, too. That is, the words you've mentioned are ...



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