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4

No. They are synonyms. I would argue that Samstag is in more common usage if you want to address an audience across all of Germany. The Tagesschau daily news program, although being produced in Hamburg uses Samstag (compare the weather forecast at the end of last Friday’s report). The regional weekly newspaper in Braunschweig (Neue Braunschweiger) ...


0

The basic answer is yes; the date can be in any case since the case is governed by the verb or expression around it. In the case of haben, the verb requires an accusative object, so it must be Wir haben den dritten Oktober. For sein, the verb requires two nominatives, so we need to use nominative: Heute ist der dritte Oktober. And of course, ...


3

For me as a native German speaker, I would say "Heute ist der dritte." as my first option. (See that I left the month part out since it is obvious most of the time that we know which month we have). This would probably the most common answer in spoken German language since pretty much every spoken language tries to abbreviate as much as possible. If ...


1

In German courses in school students are often required to write the date in the following form (most likely because it is the most verbose form) : Heute haben wir Montag, den dritten Oktober zweitausendsechs


5

Both Wir haben (heute) den dritten Oktober. and Es ist der dritte Oktober. / Heute ist der dritte Oktober. are common. There is no semantic difference between the two phrases.


0

Why should there be an extra 'e'? Er/sie/es bekommt, ihr bekommt. Er/sie/es tanzt, ihr tanzt. Er/sie/es lacht, ihr lacht. Er/sie/es spricht, ihr sprecht. An 'e' is inserted in e.g., reden (er/sie/es redet, ihr redet) because you cannot pronounce "redt" well. In old forms of German (or when people want to impress you on the Mittelaltermarkt) you may ...


2

The rule that is given in Schaum's Outline for the simple present tense (indicative) is written in a somewhat confusing way. It should be read When an infinitive stem ends in -m or -n preceded by a consonant other than "l", "r", "m", "n", or "h", or if it ends in -d or -t, then -e- is added. That means, the rule does not apply to verbs like kommen, ...


1

In german the position of an adversative particle has a crutial effect on the sentence: It defines the phrase on which the author of the sentence wanted to put the focus on. Example 1: Er runzelte die Stirn, sie aber sagte noch nichts; Here the word "aber" comes immediately after the word "sie" and therefore the focus on this word changes the meaning ...


0

Bekommen is not a regular verb. Regular verbs with a stem ending with -m (also with t; d; or n) add an extra e for the 2nd. and 3rd. person singular and 2nd. person plural. The following verbs belong in that group: antworten; arbeiten; atmen; begegnen; beobachten; bilden; bitten; finden; gründen; heiraten; mieten; öffnen; rechnen; reden; retten; ...


5

Als Ellipse (griechisch ἔλλειψις élleipsis „Fehlen“, „Aussparung“, „Auslassung“) bezeichnet man das Auslassen von Satzteilen, aber auch die Sätze mit diesen Auslassungen. Häufig wird das Prädikat ausgelassen. Quelle: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellipse_%28Linguistik%29 Which does indeed apply to your question. I would not consider the second part a ...


4

Just for clarification: Chatraum can be found in the Duden, so it is legit. A very cursory Google search gave me quite a few hits, but as I see it, they are targeting a somewhat, hm, how should I put it … A slightly low-brow crowd which may be less familiar with English and technical terms than the average user. I personally would choose Chatroom ...


3

I never saw the term Chatraum being used by a reputable website. Websites designed for children tend to translate every anglicism and loanword into German. Thus rather weird terms like Chatraum can be found throughout the web. So, in this example and probably in many others, you should stay with the English terms.


2

The additional "es" emphasizes a little bit what to follow. You can use it to put more weight on the infinitive. Side note: You don't necessarily need a comma if you are not using "es" (because the infinitive entity takes over the function of an object in this case).


1

Grammatikalisch richtig ist all das: Das Ziel ist es, etwas zu tun. Das Ziel ist, etwas zu tun. Ziel ist es, etwas zu tun. Ziel ist, etwas zu tun. Die Satzaussage ist immer die gleiche, wobei es aber eher selten vorkommt, ein Tun, eine Handlung als Ziel festzulegen. Ein Ziel ist (nicht immer, aber in der Regel) ein Zustand, und die ...


2

Das Ziel ist, etwas zu tun. Etwas zu tun(,) ist das Ziel. Wie du anhand dieser beiden Varianten sehen kannst, ist das es nicht notwendig. Es ist aber auch nicht falsch. Es verweist quasi schon einmal auf den folgenden Infinitiv, und trennt ihn dadurch – meines Erachtens – etwas stärker vom Restsatz ab. Grammatikalisch würde ich den Infinitiv als ...


0

The word "aber" always relativises the first part of the sentence (before the comma). So it is related to the first part and does not change the meaning of the words after it.


2

Both are grammatically acceptable, and both can be used interchangeably. In the prepositional form, the preposition rules the case - "von" wants dative case, so "Menschen" is dative plural. In the form without a preposition, the case is genitive (Finding out is not exactly easy, but works best if you try and add an adjective to the substantive, like) ...


3

I also strongly vote for correspondence to (i). The second question as many people, as would fill a hall is in my opinion very difficult, no matter, in which language, since a hall is no standard size, and a hall in a school is several orders of magnitude smaller than a hall in a convention center. I would always resort to numbers instead, like mehrere ...


3

Ein Saal voll Menschen is a hall which is full of people. If you want to denote the number of people that fit into a hall that would be ein Saalvoll Menschen That is not exactly standard but will probably be understood. Otherwise, you always have the possibility of adding a subordinate clause: So viele Menschen, dass ein Saal davon voll werden ...


2

Both are correct, but I think "Der Saal war voller Menschen" is the best (I'm from Germany, so...).


2

I hope I got your question right, your point is not exactly clear. Assuming that: Your cases are indistinguishable without further context. "Ein Glas voll Milch" can either target at the glass (as a measure for milk) or the milk (as the content measured). In English, you would distinguish the cases by talking either of a Roomful of people or a ...


5

Formal writing seems decisively in favour of trotz + genitive, as it has been since the mid-19th century. The larger dynamic here is that the use of SMS and the like have democratised writing a bit, therefore dialect (for example Swiss) and vernacular elements generally are being written a bit more. But that is different than any shift in what is printed ...


1

In all of those expressions the aber/doch does little more than denote an opposition between the first and the second part. Any type of significance of one part is introduced by other words in the sentences/fragments. Er ist zwar nicht reich, dafür aber gesund. It is the dafür that emphasises the positivity of being healthy whose benefits outweigh the ...


1

Aber in these sentences can be seen in exactly the same role that the English word but would fill. As such it covers the entire clause The sentence sie schreibt gern Romane, baut aber ungern Betten would translate as She loves to write novels but she dislikes making beds The sentence er kommt, aber sein Vater is verhindert Aber He'll ...


2

I would disagree. He thinks theres an "Anliegen", and he's glad because of that. (Er freut sich ÜBER das Anliegen (which he thinks there would be)) The other possibility would be, he KNOWS theres an "Anliegen", and he can't await to hear it. (Er freut sich AUF das Anliegen)



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