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-1

I know this is not exactly on topic, but it is a curious fact that in Yiddish the use of "es gibt" is considered a serious faus pas. A common acceptable alternative is: es gefinnt sich a buch... which of course roughly follows the German, but there are also: 'sis dâ a buch... (the â here indicates a vowel shift to o or u) 'sis dâ vorhan a buch... or ...


1

'Jenseits' can also mean 'beyond': 'Jenseits von Gut und Böse' => "Beyond Good and Evil', so I'd go with "beyond thought, wisdom hums" for your translation.


1

I believe your translation is pretty straight forward. To try to translate it differently might add complications that are not necessary and could eventually even cloud the meaning of what you try to say. The only correction I have is to remove the comma. Unless I am mistaken, in German you wouldn't put a comma there (see here: ...


-2

Ich habe gehört. (standard German) In Tirol, one would say something like Ich hob kaeth.


0

You do not differ in German. As ingmar wrote, we use the appropriate case on the subject and list the objects afterward. In your example: case = Dativ feminin, subject = Mädchen -> Dem Mädchen If you want to point the importance of different elements of your list, you choose the order exactly like that. There are no grammatical rules for that so the ...


2

We use cases, so order is less important. You use dative to indicate the person something is given to (dem Mädchen). The most common way of putting it would be: Ich habe dem Mädchen Eier und Schinken gegeben. Other versions are possible, though, if you want to highlight other parts of the phrase: Ich habe die Eier und den Schinken dem Mädchen ...


2

You have to distinguish between semi-reflexive verbs (Ich wasche mich/dich/sie...), and fully reflexive ones (Ich freue mich/dich/sie/...). Some reflexive verbs come with a dative sich. To find out whether those are fully or semi reflexive, try to replace sich with another dative pronoun: Das Kind merkt sich/dir/ihr alles. So sich merken is fully reflexive. ...


2

Both versions are possible, and they are equivalent. The Duden has a nice short article about this phenomenon.


8

This is a Kürzel and represent the author or the source of the article. This Kürzel may be the initials, but it may be another abbreviation. In the print version is sometimes a list nearby the 'Impressum'. You can check some examples of Kürzel on the website of the FAZ, for Baden-Württemberg There are special Kürzel: red is normally not a person but ...


3

You are right, it’s the author, Michaela Wiegel in this case. The abbrevation is displayed prominently on her author profile. Here is a list of FAZ authors – or just google for "FAZ" + [shortname].


0

"hilfsbereit" is someone who is willing to help - that doesn't mean that what this person does is actually helpful (but the word doesn't indicate that someone isn't actually helping, it's neutral in that respect). "hilfreich" is someone or something who or which is helpful. A screwdriver is "hilfreich" if you need to loosen a screw. A car mechanic is also ...


1

I would say "hilfsbereit" refers to a person who tends to help others. And "hilfreich" mostly refers to non-persons as in "Ich hoffe meine Antwort war hilfreich", meaning was of some help. Occasionally "hilfreich" can refer to a person, meaning that person has helped a lot.


4

Both can be used to describe people, with a difference: hilfsbereit means that someone is glad/likely/ready to help. It can, but does not necessarily mean that this person actually does/did something helpful - for that you have hilfreich. Examples Telling you Du warst heute sehr hilfsbereit. You were very eager to help today. instead of Du warst ...


1

You are right about a) being correct and the meaning of the resulting sentence. "hilfreich" directly applied on people - to me it sounds a bit strange. E.g. when I wanted to thank someone I would rather say "Sie haben mir sehr geholfen" oder "Sie waren mir eine große Hilfe". But the Duden explicitly gives examples in that direction, so it is definitely ...


2

My opinion as a German native speaker: If you use "es gibt", then don't forget that you use a term, that is often used to replace other words. It is an expression that is used primarily in the vernacular. For example: "There is a problem." -> "Es gibt ein Problem" stands for "Es ist ein Problem aufgetreten" or "Wir haben ein Problem" "There are volcanoes ...


4

Taking a rather very naïve approach: Here is the Google-Ngram for there is/are in English: And here is the same one for es gibt in German: Assuming that the Ngrams reflect the actual speech, there is/are is used about three times as often at the very beginning of the sentence than es gibt. Something similar holds for cases where there is some ...


4

The point is that es gibt, befinden und existieren are used differently with some intersections. Some examples. Being somewhere: Es gibt Kuchen in der Küche (There is cake in the kitchen (implies that you can have some) Es befindet sich Kuchen in der Küche (it is just there) Es existiert Kuchen in der Küche (correct, but no one would use it) ...


12

I can only speak for myself – and I don't know how often you usually use "there is" – but I have the feeling, that "es gibt" is used constantly: it's simple, it can be informal and direct, it's rather neutral, and it's handy. I hear it (and use it) all the time: at work, in restaurants, when talking about the TV program, etc. Just some quick samples: ...



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