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2

I would disagree. He thinks theres an "Anliegen", and he's glad because of that. (Er freut sich ÜBER das Anliegen (which he thinks there would be)) The other possibility would be, he KNOWS theres an "Anliegen", and he can't await to hear it. (Er freut sich AUF das Anliegen)


0

Allein is a difficult one for various reasons. First, it's usage (in adverbial rather that adjective form) is kind of aging (and has always been a bit on the posh end of things), and no longer commonly used. You will not find many good examples of usage in everyday German. Apart from being high-level language, allein can be and is today used interchangeably ...


1

From the meaning of the sentence, I am leaning towards your turn of event description although I find it hard to see a difference between the two. There is certainly a direct-contrast type of element in the entire thing but I feel the main importance is on the sequential aspect where the later situation is substantially different from before because of how ...


1

Anmelden would have the connotation of official registration. As in through sign-up, written registration. Melden would be like raising a hand, making an announcement, stepping forward. It's the general decision to sign up for something, but may not yet involve the formal process. If it does it could be used synonymously. You would use sich für das ...


3

I think, there is a difference between the use of sich melden zu and sich melden für (even though I couldn’t find references). I would use sich melden zu to signal that I am here and ready to work. Whereas with sich melden für I would show the willingness to do the job in general/later. Example with zu: A: “Ich melde mich zum Putzen” B: “Gut, ...


1

Your wild guess is wrong, probably because the examples you have seen seem to imply this and are not very well chosen. "Sich streiten" and "streiten" mean more or less the same thing, at least in most cases. "Um" just adds the object argued about. There is a small difference in possible applicability. The reflexive form always refers to more than one ...


2

It's correct as well, and there is no difference in meaning. There is only a small difference in usage: "sich melden zu" can only be used with an activity, say, sich zum Dienst melden sich zum Geschirrspülen melden whereas "sich melden für" can be used with an activity, but also with a place or time (where/when the activity takes place) or an ...


0

The cases. One is Genitiv (auf wessen Kosten?) and the other is Dativ (auf Kosten von wem oder was?), otherwise both are used interchangeably. None is more sophisticated than the other, it's merely a matter of taste.


3

The following two sentences are correct. They both express a geographical distance. Er wohnt weit entfernt von mir. Er wohnt weit weg von mir. In your first sentence, Er wohnt weit von mir, I am missing something. It's not wrong, but I would like more context. It could be a geographical distance, but it could be also a poetic expression of an ...


8

Actually, there is a difference. Weit is not commonly used for distances (i.e. in the sense of "far") without being accompanied by "entfernt" or "weg". weit standing alone can be used for clothing, meaning a wide fit, or for a wide landscape (i.e. in the sense of "wide", a close relative). Er wohnt weit weg von uns Er wohnt weit entfernt von uns. ...


2

Auf Kosten anderer is a little more "sophisticated".


1

Actually there is no difference. I think most commonly you would use: Er wohnt weit weg von mir.


3

Your choice. There is no difference, both expressions mean the same and are used in exactly the same context. Very much like in English on account of s.o. on someone's account


0

In German, word order can be used to put different emphasis on different parts of the sentence. Typically, the position of the particle is chosen as close as possible to the main adversary part. Im Allgemeinen war er kein guter Schüler, jedoch in Latein war er allen überlegen. Im Allgemeinen war er kein guter Schüler, in Latein jedoch war er allen ...


1

I would interpret "jedoch" in the adverbial usage as a modal particle (see wikipedia entry). It is not really part of the sentence but expresses the expectations of the speaker or listener. German does not have a subjunctive mood, so I think that is why these little words are used. In the first two examples you cannot remove "jedoch" (or "aber"). "Die ...


1

I'm not sure your distinction in usage between coordinating conjunction and adverb makes sense in the way you describe it. Canoo classifies jedoch as conjunctional adverb. For words of these class, the position in the sentence is (more or less) free, and it affects word order, like an adverb, while the function is the same as for a coordinating conjunction. ...


1

The meanings are basically the same. Use vergleichen if someone compares two things, not including themselves: Er vergleicht das neue Samsung-Smartphone mit dem iPhone. Er vergleicht sein Testergebnis mit dem Ergebnis seines Nachbarn. Use sich vergleichen if someone compares themselves with something else: Er vergleicht sich mit seinem Boss. ...


5

Germans don't say "Ich weiß einen Platz." nor "Ich weiß einen Ort.". They say: "Ich kenne einen Ort." "Gibt es einen Ort in der Nähe zum Übernachten?" is correct. (People understand that you're searching for a hostel or something similar.) If you talk about a "Platz" in regard to "übernachten", it's a spot to sleep (as in: "Du kannst deinen Schlafsack da ...


4

Kann man durchaus sagen, hört sich aber ein klein wenig steif an. Ich persönlich würde das so formulieren: "Ich habe Interesse an (der?) Systementwicklung und würde gerne in Ihrem Unternehmen mitarbeiten, um praktische Erfahrungen zu sammeln." Wobei hier Nuancen unklar bleiben, wegen unbekanntem Kontext. So ist "der Systementwicklung" mehr bezogen auf ein ...



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