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24

Technically, möchte is the subjunctive II (Konjunktiv II) of mögen. However, mögen is special, as it changes in a different way than other verbs do when put into the subjuncitve mood: While with most verbs, the subjunctive II mainly conveys the irrealis (i.e., that whatever is described, is not real), mögen changes its meaning from to like (and some others) ...


22

Welcome to the wonderful world of german separable verb prefixes :-) "Tempel ein" isn't a phrase but the result of separating the verb's prefix from the main part of the verb. In your examples, the complete verb is "einführen" resp. "eindringen". In both cases, you can separate the prefix "ein-" from the rest of the verb; and the difficult thing is that the ...


18

Strictly speaking, welche möchte Sie lieber? would mean something like which one likes you better? Meaning Sie would be the object of mögen, and welche the subject. Without any more context I would say that it was indeed a typo, the construction would only work in certain situations (in this case welche would have to refer to a previously ...


17

It's just a matter of style; the meaning is the same. In everyday spoken German you say "aufmachen", in written or higher-register German you say or write "öffnen".


16

Yes, it's definitely used when making reference to a telephone call or similar: Wann hören wir uns wieder? Auf Wiederhören, bis zum nächsten Mal.


15

There is a transitive and an intransitive version of "treiben". The transitive "treiben" generally means imparting a more or less constant movement to somebody, in the sense of chasing or startling them, or something, mostly of a more abstract kind, as an occupation, a craft, a sport, etc. Examples: Ich treibe Sport (I do sports; I think practise isn't ...


15

"Müssen" in German can also imply direction - the usage you are expecting is as auxiliary verb, like "können", "dürfen", "sollen": Etwas tun müssen Gehen müssen But you may use it without any verb to suggest movement without specifying the form (going, driving, flying, whatever) because it is important to be there, not how you got there. Ich muss ...


13

Neither. The most common way to describe announce the intention of taking a shower would be Ich gehe duschen. The noun Dusche is used for describing the place and devices/fittings/plumbings required for taking a shower, but rarely (if ever) for the activity. Another possibility would be Ich gehe kurz unter die Dusche. For taking a bath it ...


13

The word you are looking for is schunkeln. Oftentimes people who schunkel link arms with their neighbours and rock rhythmically to the left and right. Although you will often see people holding their beer or so while schunkling, neither the drinking nor the linking arms is obligatory. The core of schunkling is the swinging/rocking to the music.


12

"Anflicken" is a composition of "an" and "flicken". "Flicken" means to patch something. Together with "an" it means, that the object is being enlarged. Example: DEU: Ich flicke etwas Seide an den Schal an. ENG: I patch the scarf with some silk. I am not an native English speaker. So, please excuse my mistakes. I hope I could answer your question...


10

Yes, Kennst Du Angela Merkel? is ambiguous, but so is the english version. Erkennst du Angela Merkel? depends on something that can be seen (or heard, felt...) at the moment. To remove the ambiguity, use Weißt Du wer Angela Merkel ist?


9

Good news: you can use "sein" in all of this cases, especially when talking, and even more so as a foreigner. It is just an issue of style in written language to avoid these weak verbs ("sein", "haben") and use more specialized ones. I have just a small problem with your choice "der Laden steht an der Ecke" (also confirmed by @hellcode). While I had no ...


9

There's a slight difference in register: öffnen is considered the standard expression for open, whereas aufmachen is somewhat more informal. It can be used sometimes, but not always, instead of öffnen. You're on the safe side with öffnen.


9

There are two main classes in German verb conjugation: Strong verbs are verbs that form their past tense with ablaut (singen - sang - gesungen); weak verbs are verbs that form their past tense with a dental suffix (leben - lebte - gelebt). The phenomenon that you describe (vowel change in present singular) is primarily one that occurs in strong verb ...


9

The correct / common expression would be "der Fußball liegt" though I don't know where exactly the thin line between "liegen" and "stehen" would actually go. Your example with the computer is quite a border line case (as is the football) depending of what type of computer you're dealing with: a laptop computer would always be lying (liegen) on the table ...


8

The most common way to talk about pieces of writing is using the verb "stehen" In dem Artikel steht, dass... Auf Seite 3 steht, dass... Ich habe einen Flyer und da steht, dass...


8

You first set of suggestions is correct and only missing karoshi's addition of nachschauen. Ordered by register from high to low: nachschlagen, nachschauen, nachsehen, nachgucken anschauen is not correct. It would mean, to look at the word as it is printed on that very sheet of paper or at the blackboard or whereever.


8

Ziemlich sicher liegt Wiki hier falsch. Du kannst "erfolgen" vergleichen mit den nahezu gleichbedeutenden Verben "passieren" und "geschehen", die auch mit dem Hilfsverb "sein" ihr Perfekt bilden. Ich habe noch nie gehört, dass etwas erfolgt habe.


8

pflegen zu + inf., e.g. Meine Großmutter pflegt jeden Nachmittag ein Mittagsschläfchen zu machen.


8

Ein transitives Verb kann aus stilistischen Gründen ohne („ausdrückliches“) Objekt stehen - das ändert dann nichts daran, dass sich das Verb immer noch auf ein Objekt bezieht. Nur ist es dann am Leser, das Objekt aus dem Kontext zu ergänzen. Hier geht es durchweg um ein Team, das auch als Objekt zu „zusammenschweißen” ergänzt werden muss. Team, Mannschaft ...


8

Die Antwort ist: nein. "Existieren" hat kein richtiges Komplement. Das "es" im Beispiel ist das berühmt-berüchtigte Füll-Es, das hier immer wieder zu Fragen führt. Dieses "es" ist funktional nicht das gleiche, wie das Regen-Es. Es regnet heute. Es gibt einen Grund. In diesen beiden Sätzen ist "es" das Subjekt, und es bleibt erhalten, wenn man den ...


7

There's no verb "möchten", the forms you see are the Konjuntiv II forms of mögen. In fact it's so common that it's often introduced, confusingly, as a modal verb independent from mögen, but that's not correct. It must be said, however, that the Konjunktinv II is used far more often as a true modal verb than the Indicative. Whereas "ich möchte etw. tun" ...


7

While sein is is the most generally applicable way to denote the location of anything, it is indeed quite common in German to be be more precise if possible. Befinden is not more specific than sein when referring to locations, but it is a higher register in terms of formality. Which more specific verb you can use depends a lot less on the kind of object ...


7

Sich unterhalten means to have a conversation, i.e. it involves both talking and listening. Sprechen simply means to speak: you do that in a conversation, too, but it can also be one-sided. Think of der Sprecher (speaker), der Lautsprecher (loudspeaker), der Fernsprecher (old word for telephone), der Fürsprecher (intercessor) etc.


7

Im Englischen benutzt man "to go" um irgendwohin zu gelangen ("I go to Europe", "I go to the store", "I go by train"). Das sagt nicht unbedingt etwas darüber aus, wie man dahin kommt. Im Deutschen bezieht sich gehen immer auf die eigenen Füße (to walk). Deshalb kannst Du "losgehen" hier nicht verwenden, denn das würde heißen, dass der Busfahrer den Bus ...


7

In this context abgeschlossen is the only correct word given the choices: You are writing a job application (or something like that) and you have completed your Masters successfully (I assume). Abgeschlossen is just the right word for that situation. Other words: vollendet, absolviert. Beenden in this context is weird, because it does not imply that you ...


7

"Ausziehen" und "ablegen" belong to different registers. While "ausziehen" is the everyday word for the act in concern, "ablegen" is antiquated or lofty language. Apart from that, "ablegen" rather refers to "surplus-clothing", so to say, clothes which you wear outside but not inside. Especially a coat. In old German movies (or dubbed old American movies), ...


7

First of all, as it shown in the link given by rogermue or at this page by canoo.net, possible candidates for such verbs can be made out by their prefix: Only durch, über, um, unter, wider and wieder can lead to verbs that are both separable and inseparable. Note that both sources list wieder as an always-separable prefix, which is wrong by counter-example: ...



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