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22

Technically, möchte is the subjunctive II (Konjunktiv II) of mögen. However, mögen is special, as it changes in a different way than other verbs do when put into the subjuncitve mood: While with most verbs, the subjunctive II mainly conveys the irrealis (i.e., that whatever is described, is not real), mögen changes its meaning from to like (and some others) ...


16

Yes, it's definitely used when making reference to a telephone call or similar: Wann hören wir uns wieder? Auf Wiederhören, bis zum nächsten Mal.


13

Neither. The most common way to describe announce the intention of taking a shower would be Ich gehe duschen. The noun Dusche is used for describing the place and devices/fittings/plumbings required for taking a shower, but rarely (if ever) for the activity. Another possibility would be Ich gehe kurz unter die Dusche. For taking a bath it ...


13

sich freuen auf is used when you are looking forward to something, i.e. in an anticipatory context: Ich freue mich auf die Sommerferien! / Ich freue mich auf deinen Besuch. (future event) sich freuen über is used when you are excited about something, e.g. a gift or present or a general event. Ich freue mich über die Beförderung! / Ich freue mich ...


13

It's just a matter of style; the meaning is the same. In everyday spoken German you say "aufmachen", in written or higher-register German you say or write "öffnen".


12

"Anflicken" is a composition of "an" and "flicken". "Flicken" means to patch something. Together with "an" it means, that the object is being enlarged. Example: DEU: Ich flicke etwas Seide an den Schal an. ENG: I patch the scarf with some silk. I am not an native English speaker. So, please excuse my mistakes. I hope I could answer your question...


11

Both are valid. The form with "pflegte" is very high register, and you wouldn't normally say that. You'll understand it now when you come across it, but don't bother using it. "Früher" is much more common, and in everyday speech, you'd use the verb in Perfekt: "Früher habe ich in Kiew gelebt"/"Ich habe früher in Kiew gelebt".


10

Also ich würde es als Aussage aus der Ich-Perspektive verstehen: [Ich (die App)] installiere [mich auf dem Handy] oder [Ich (das Handy)] installiere [die App auf mir] Als Softwareentwickler denke ich, dass es eine etwas fehlerhafte Übersetzung des englischen Installing ist Für mich klingt [Die App] installiert [sich] aber auch falsch. ...


10

Yes, Kennst Du Angela Merkel? is ambiguous, but so is the english version. Erkennst du Angela Merkel? depends on something that can be seen (or heard, felt...) at the moment. To remove the ambiguity, use Weißt Du wer Angela Merkel ist?


9

In my impression the words abhängen and rumhängen have been replaced by chillen. People in their twenties and older may still use abhängen and rumhängen (especially when talking about teens), but teens seem to use chillen much more often. I even think that abhängen and rumhängen sound pretty oldfashioned to teens (like knorke was oldfashioned and replaced by ...


9

Good news: you can use "sein" in all of this cases, especially when talking, and even more so as a foreigner. It is just an issue of style in written language to avoid these weak verbs ("sein", "haben") and use more specialized ones. I have just a small problem with your choice "der Laden steht an der Ecke" (also confirmed by @hellcode). While I had no ...


9

Disclaimer: I am by far not a native speaker, not even an advanced learner, but here goes my take. Konjunktiv II can be formed in two ways: with umlauting(if possible) the vowel of the Präteritum and adding -e at the end, or by using würde + Infinitiv. Incidentally, würde itself is the Konjunktiv II form of werden. For example: Infinitiv: gehen ...


9

Yes. It's actually a rhetorical device named Zeugma. A few examples: Er trat die Tür ein und den Rückweg an. Ich heiße nicht nur Heinz Erhardt, sondern Sie auch herzlich willkommen. Ich fror vor mich hin, denn nicht nur meine Mutter, auch der Ofen war ausgegangen.


8

There's no verb "möchten", the forms you see are the Konjuntiv II forms of mögen. In fact it's so common that it's often introduced, confusingly, as a modal verb independent from mögen, but that's not correct. It must be said, however, that the Konjunktinv II is used far more often as a true modal verb than the Indicative. Whereas "ich möchte etw. tun" ...


8

There's a difference between both sentences. The first one means: I'm going to log into my Gmail account tomorrow. So you're going to check for new e-mails or you're going to send one. The latter on the other hand means: I'm going to activate my Gmail account tomorrow. In this case you have a new account which needs activation first, before you ...


8

Es gibt einen Fehler auf dem Tisch. Es, although an impersonal is still the subject acting on the object (the mistake). Imagine if in English you said It gives a mistake on the table. the mistake is still being given by the it. On the other hand, if you said Es ist ja niemand da. then it's niemand and not niemanden because sein is a ...


8

Beide Varianten sind korrekt. Sie haben allerdings eine unterschiedliche Bedeutung. Ich habe Lust, nur in der Nähe zu fahren. Hier bedeutet "in der Nähe" eine begrenzte, statische Umgebung, etwas wie eine Zonenangabe. Wenn du "in der Nähe" zum Beispiel mit "im Schulhof" austauschst, wird klar, dass es sich um eine Ortsergänzung im 3. Fall (Dativ, ...


8

Wenn du dich nicht auf das Präfix ver- festlegst, dann findest du einige weitere: erröten ergrauen ergrünen begrünen einbläuen (nicht die Wortbedeutung, die früher als einbleuen geschrieben wurde) einschwärzen Die Vorsible ver- drückt halt u.a. eine negative Entwicklung bzw. eine Auflösung aus. Beim Gelbwerden von Buchseiten ...


8

A dictionary providing all forms of prefixes to a given verb with appropriate translations will lead to rather lengthy lists because there are so many. Let me therefore suggest the following approach which will give you a concise list of most if not all prefixed verb forms. Search for wordformation of a given verb in canoonet From the huge list of form ...


8

You first set of suggestions is correct and only missing karoshi's addition of nachschauen. Ordered by register from high to low: nachschlagen, nachschauen, nachsehen, nachgucken anschauen is not correct. It would mean, to look at the word as it is printed on that very sheet of paper or at the blackboard or whereever.


8

Ziemlich sicher liegt Wiki hier falsch. Du kannst "erfolgen" vergleichen mit den nahezu gleichbedeutenden Verben "passieren" und "geschehen", die auch mit dem Hilfsverb "sein" ihr Perfekt bilden. Ich habe noch nie gehört, dass etwas erfolgt habe.


8

pflegen zu + inf., e.g. Meine Großmutter pflegt jeden Nachmittag ein Mittagsschläfchen zu machen.


8

You are talking about agent nouns. VERB STEM+er does that for many German verbs, technically. But it does not always make sense or sound natural: läuten → Läuter? regnen → Regner? zerschlagen → Zerschläger? or Zerschlager? (some people will refuse the second version because "Schlager" already exists as word for "popular song") ...


7

It is almost fine, but unlike in English, you need an object to wissen: Ich werde es dich wissen lassen. Depending on context, it may sound a bit brisk or reserved. Another common option is: Ich werde dir Bescheid geben/sagen. As in most cases, it isn't necessary to explicitly use a future tense. You can equally well say: Ich lasse es dich ...


7

While sein is is the most generally applicable way to denote the location of anything, it is indeed quite common in German to be be more precise if possible. Befinden is not more specific than sein when referring to locations, but it is a higher register in terms of formality. Which more specific verb you can use depends a lot less on the kind of object ...


7

Short summary: If you are either able to retrace or to reconstruct something or able to follow someone, then you can use nachvollziehen. If, however, it's just about understanding and comprehension of the nature of something, you can only use verstehen. Elaborated answer: Both words have an overlapping sense but verstehen is a little broader in meaning. ...


7

I think there are two reasons for that anomality: Präteritum indeed is much shorter and since sein and haben are used very often it is very economical to reduce speach length here Germans generally prefer Perfekt over Präteritum in spoken language. However Perfekt just sounds a bit weird for sein and haben because it duplicates the same words. In bin ...


7

Just a side note but it may become relevant to people traveling to Germany where regionally "laufen" does not mean the same as "rennen" but is generally used for "gehen": Sollen wir ein Taxi nehmen, oder wollen wir laufen? Seit wir umgezogen sind, kann Peter zu seiner Arbeit laufen.


7

The verb konzentrieren is usually used reflexively: Ich konzentriere mich (auf etwas) Du konzentrierst dich ... Er konzentriert sich ... Also in your case, the conference is concentrating on something: Die Konferenz konzentriert sich auf die globale Erwärmung. On a side note, konzentrieren is usually reserved for humans, so I would suggest using ...


7

riechen an Das Mädchen riecht an der frischen Wäsche. (Der Hund schnuppert an der Einkaufstüte.) riechen nach Die ganze Wohnung riecht (duftet) nach Weihnachtsgebäck.



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