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"Kehren" and "fegen" both refer to "sweep" although they have somewhat different connotations. "Kehren" means "to turn around," which is something that you do when you are "sweeping." But I've also seen kehren used in other contexts, such as "dancing." "Fegen has more of the connotation of "cleaning." Sweeping is one form of cleaning, specifically of ...


1

In German, the verb always comes second in a statement. That seems to be the gist of your question, using your example. Next time, spell it out that way. So it begins correctly, "In meiner Freizeit" (adverbial clause). The next thing that needs to come is the verb "lesen." But it's not the infinitive you need to use but the conjugated version (with ich), ...


3

I can think of some more examples; (and I guess that there are still even more): fehlen - fehlte - gefehlt be-/empfehlen - be-/empfahl - be-/empfohlen fehlen comes via French from Latin fallere. be-/empfehlen is unrelated and inherited from Germanic. bergen - barg - geborgen beherbergen - beherbergte - beherbergt beherbergen is derived from ...


0

Here's another one: reiten / ritt / geritten vs. bereiten / bereitete / bereitet I have no time at the moment to check it out, but I'm pretty sure that it is the same case as in your question: reiten and bereiten are etymologically unrelated.


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This is quite rare indeed. There are certainly similar examples, but at the moment I don't have any that come to mind. On the above: entgleiten is being handled like gleiten as they have a similar definition. begleiten follows the word leiten in terms of grammar.


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I assume that the verb construction jemand einer Sache berauben is influenced by Latin or modelled after Latin. The Latin grammar has a chapter about ablative of separation where the construction of verbs such as orbare, privare, spoliare, exuere, all of them meaning berauben, plus ablative is explained. Egere/ indigere could have ablative or genitive. As ...


4

I cannot provide an etymological reason for the cases the verb berauben rules. However, I have the feeling that the main cause lies in the prefix be-. Let's analyze the cases of berauben and rauben: jemandem (Dat.) etwas (Akk.) rauben jemanden (Akk.) einer Sache (Gen.) berauben We can see that the prefix be- shifted the accusative case from the ...


1

The genitive is only used for the object that's robbed of somebody: Der Räuber (nom.) hat den Mann (acc.) seiner Brieftasche (gen.) beraubt Also note that this is high register and a very formal way of putting it. It's actually much more common to use the passive here: Dem Mann (dat.) wurde die Brieftasche (nom.) geraubt (Also, it's common not ...


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I'd go with the definite article; or none at all. Relaxieren does not exist. It's relaxen. Für is not the proper preposition here, but zum. You don't need the reflexive sich. You can add it, though. After the preposition zum (and für for that matter), the verb 'functions' as substantive. Zu, however, is part of the infinitive, so you need to drop it. When ...


0

Ein Sonntag sollte einen Tag für relaxieren (relaxen?) und sich zu ausruhen sein. There are several problems with your sentence: Two nouns are connected by the verb sein; here, both nouns should be in the nominative case, because sein uses a so-called Gleichsetzungsnominativ (equalisation nominative): Ein Sonntag (subject, nominative) sollte ein ...


2

The correct way is: Sonntag sollte ein Tag zum Entspannen und Ausruhen sein. you wouldn't necessarily say "Ein Sonntag" but just "Sonntag" when referring to this day in general. to relax in German is also "entspannen" I changed the structure to make it grammatically correct


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In principle you can turn every reflexive verb into a participle keeping the sich, but you have to be careful about the tense and the grammatical voice: Der Mann befindet sich zurzeit in Frankfurt. → der sich zurzeit in Frankfurt befindende Mann Die Tarifverhandlungen haben sich festgefahren. → die sich festgefahren habenden Tarifverhandlungen I ...



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