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4

"Da (sein)" can mean "(being) here|there|(at some place)" to express the existance or presence of something or someone, as probably in all of your examples. Habe keine Angst, die Polizei ist ja bald da. ('da' -> 'hier, bei uns') "Da" can also be used to replace "dort", which refers to an explicit location. You can identify that meaning when ...


0

In fact you could use all three verbs in this sentence, but only "probieren" gives the meaning of your English phrase. Testen means "to test" (no surprise, since this is the origin of this word according to the Duden) or "to try out". You can apply it on things, but not on actions. In some cases it can be used as a synonym to "probieren", but in general the ...


2

The verb you want for "test," in the context of food, is "probieren." "Testen" does mean "test," in the sense of "test drive" of e.g. a car. It is more "active" than probieren. "Probieren" means to "test" in the sense of "taste test." "Schmecken" just means to "taste." An English synonym might be to "savor."


-2

In theory you can put the ending -er to any verb, but this ending has a special meaning. If you derive a agent noun X-er from a verb X, a X-er is not just someone or something that is doing X, but whose innate character is doing x. For example, Lehrer (from lehren - to teach) is not just someone who is teaching, but someone whose profession is teaching. ...


8

You are talking about agent nouns. VERB STEM+er does that for many German verbs, technically. But it does not always make sense or sound natural: läuten → Läuter? regnen → Regner? zerschlagen → Zerschläger? or Zerschlager? (some people will refuse the second version because "Schlager" already exists as word for "popular song") ...


1

There are indeed very subtle differences in both meaning and usage. Something that hasn't been mentioned here before: you can use zweifeln without any object at all: Ich zweifle. would be possible to say and is as general as Ich denke. or Ich glaube. Another example: Glaubst Du nun endlich an die Auferstehung? Nein, ich zweifle immer noch. ...


2

Ankommen vs Eintreffen There is a difference between ankommen and eintreffen. The former one is much more generic, you can also "ankommen/arrive" at a certain state of mind. If the journey was stressful and long, the host will often say to the eintreffenden (arriving) guests: "Kommt (or formal: Kommen Sie) erst mal an!" in the sense of taking off the ...


3

Wann wirst du zu Hause ankommen? is just fine for asking someone when the person will arrive at his/her home. If you live with your partner, you can also say Wann wirst du nach Hause kommen? or a bit more informal Wann wirst du heimkommen? to ask her when she will come home. Wann wirst du zu Hause eintreffen? is fine, but I would ...


3

These words are indeed very closely related and can be used synonymously in most cases. All of the above express that I doubt the correctness of this statement. Ich zweifle an der Richtigkeit dieser Aussage. Ich zweifle die Richtigkeit dieser Aussage an. Ich bezweifle die Richtigkeit dieser Aussage. There is no significant difference af ...


1

"ankommen" and "eintreffen" are quite the same in the meaning of arriving at a destination or place. So both are fine with both sentences: Wann wirst du zu Hause ankommen? Wann wirst du zu Hause eintreffen? Sie wird um 6:00 Uhr ankommen. Sie wird um 6:00 Uhr eintreffen.


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Here are the meanings of the three German words in English: kommen - come ankommen - arrive eintreffen - entering a house, a room. etc.


1

Firstly, there are differences in grammar. "Anzweifeln" and "bezweifeln" can both take a direct object, while "zweifeln" connects with an object using the preposition "an" (which is likely where "anzweifeln comes from :) Ich zweifele an etwas. vs. Ich zweifele etwas an. Ich bezweifele etwas. As far as meaning goes, I'd say that "anzweifeln" ...



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