Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The ver- variants are transitive: Er spottete über das neue Produkt. Er verspottete seinen Chef. The transitive version feels more "personal", you'd probably use 1. for things (or maybe talking badly about someone behind their back), and 2. for people that are present. But that's just my feeling as a native speaker. I'm not sure if I've heard höhnen ...


4

Orthodox »Orthodox« bedeutet nicht, dass jemand »etwas rechts von streng gläubig steht«. Griechisch- oder russisch-orthodoxe Christen sind keine politisch rechten Christen, und sie hängen ihrem Glauben auch nicht strenger an als Katholiken oder Baptisten, Mormonen usw. »Orthodox« bedeutet, dass die Anhänger einer Lehre, die sich im Lauf der Zeit in mehrere ...


2

Ultra- ist hier einfach noch eine weitere Steigerung. Jemand ist nicht einfach "nur" orthodox, also strenggläubig (ich kenne das eigentlich nur im religiösen Kontext, bei Juden), sondern in ganz starkem, um nicht zu sagen übersteigertem Ausmaß: Ultraorthodoxe Juden stehen weltlichem Wissen ablehnend gegenüber und führen ein streng reguliertes, meist auf ...


2

schön - beautiful, lovely schon - already, yet, before "Du schaffst das schon" / "Du schaffst es schon" - Are both valid in this case. "Du schaffst's schon" - It shouldn't be used in formal written conversations and its only rarely used in informal spoken conversations (as pointed out by guidot).


2

Never saw it in use, but according to the Duden "authority", it is a valid, albeit seldomly used abbreviation for Leineneinband, probably used by librarians or antiquarians. If the game considers abbreviations to be valid solutions, then all is good.


1

I'm from Berlin and we would vary the saying into "(Das) Schaffst du schon." "Das" can be left out. That makes it sound a little more colloquial than "Du schaffst es schon", maybe that is what you wanted to achieve with the "schaffst's" contraction. And I completely support the notion that you should switch off the spelling checker, because they ...


1

"Ln" is definitely no German word. Edit (short explanation): Every German word must have one of the following letters: a, e, i, o, u, ä, ö, ü or in very rare cases y.


1

I may be that ln. is used as an abbreviation in some professional context but I consider this not to be a valid German word. What may have happened here is that the preposition in was (erroneously) capitalized and rendered with a sans serif font such as e.g. Arial. Then the capitalized i (top) and the l (bottom) are identical: left Arial - right Times New ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible