New answers tagged

1

The German word "Ausweis" comes from "(sich) ausweisen", which translates to 'to officially identify yourself' in English. Therefore, since "Erkennung" means "recognition", it can be considered redundant. "Ausweis" is absolutely sufficient for describing general (official) identification. Common variations of Ausweis are: "Personalausweis" => personal ...


1

The -dik ending is Yiddish, meaning "having this characteristic" and generally used to make an adjective from a noun. Chutzpah is something one can have, a noun. Chutzpadik is an adjective meaning "having chutzpah." (Example: That answer was really chutzpadik.) -dik does not come from Hebrew, and may come from the archaic high German from which Yiddish ...


3

Native speaker (Rhineland) here. I know and understand jmd. hat Chuzpe (allgemein gehalten) jmd. hat die Chuzpe, etwas zu tun (auf einen speziellen Fall bezogen) and I know that other native speakers, at least those of higher education, should understand. The word "Chutzpadik", as "freche Menschen", is unknown in modern German. Before Shoa, more ...


18

I am a historian and I had never encountered chutzpadik in German sources. I have found the word, however, in a Jüdisches Lexikon published in Berlin in 1927: Ein chuzef, auch chuzpenik oder chuzpedig = frecher Mensch and also in the 1903 issue of the Jewish magazine from Berlin Ost und West: Gotteslästerer ... chuzpedige Lümmel the latter ...


12

I’m a native speaker and I have never heard that word. Perhaps it is a bit more common in other regions then the one where I have grown up and live. There are local differences concerning the vocabulary of the spoken language. But I don’t think so in this case. I think I’ve read chuzpe in a magazine once. But long story short: Chutzpadik is not a ...


37

I’ve never heard or seen the word chutzpadik in German. Chuzpe, on the other hand, is well-known. It’s not a word that the average German is using in everyday speech, but it occurs occasionally, say, in newspaper articles, sometimes with, sometimes without explanation.



Top 50 recent answers are included